A clean list of Odonata names have been uploaded on IBP based on Subramanian, K.A. and Babu, R. (2017). Checklist of Odonata (Insecta) of India. Version 3.0.

Featured Document

Browse Documents

2036 documents found
  • Title
    Early winter avifaunal diversity from Buxa Tiger Reserve and Rasikbeel Wetland Complex of northern part of West Bengal, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    The present study was carried out to record the avifaunal diversity and abundance in and around Buxa Tiger Reserve (Raja Bhat Khawa, Buxa Fort, Raimatang and Jayanti) and Rasikbeel Wetland Complex, situated at the northern part of West Bengal, Indiaduring 19th – 22nd November, 2013. A total of 60 bird species belonging to 31 familieswere identified during four days of study period of which 8 were winter migrants, one was summer migrant and rest were resident. Anthropogenic interventions have altered much of the natural habitat of the present study location; however, a healthy avifaunal diversity was recorded during the present study. More intensive investigations will certainly enrich our knowledge of avian diversity and distribution pattern from the present study location leading to the proper conservation of this important bird area.
  • Title
    A report of the Dollarbird Eurystomus orientalis from southern West Bengal
    Type
    Journal Article
  • Title
    A rare sighting of the Long-tailed Duck Clangula hyemalis (Linnaeus, 1758) (Aves: Anseriformes: Anatidae) over a four-week period in northwestern India: first detailed scientific documentation in 73 years
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    The Long-tailed Duck Clangula hyemalis is a circumpolar species, breeding in North America, Europe and Asia, however, it is currently among the rarest ducks in Asia, and assessed as globally Vulnerable. Conservation actions explicitly include improved monitoring efforts in Asia. We report the second sighting of this species at the Gharana Wetland Reserve the third in northwestern India, in over 73 years, and have carefully documented our findings over four weeks.
    Attribution
    Pushpinder S. Jamwal, Pankaj Chandan & Rohit Rattan, Journal of Threatened Taxa, Vol 9, No 8 (2017); pp. 10631–10632 http://doi.org/10.11609/jott.3084.9.8.10631-10632
  • Title
    A checklist of butterflies (Insecta: Lepidoptera) from Taleigao Plateau, Goa, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    In a recent survey at the Taleigao plateau in Goa, a total of 98 species of butterflies belonging to 72 genera under five families were recorded. This amounts to around 39% of the total reported butterfly fauna of the state. Nymphalidae with 34 species was the most dominant family followed by Lycaenidae (25 spp.), Hesperiidae (16 spp.), Pieridae (13 spp.), and Papilionidae (11 spp.). Findings of the present study underline the importance of Taleigao plateau as a preferred habitat for butterflies.
    Attribution
    Dipak Bowalkar, Nadar Anal Gracy Michael, Kiran Gaude & I.K. Pai, Journal of Threatened Taxa, Vol 9, No 8 (2017); pp. 10626–10630 http://doi.org/10.11609/jott.2687.9.8.10626-10630
  • Title
    Records of the Palni Hills Rudraksha Tree Elaeocarpus blascoi (Oxalidales: Elaeocarpaceae) in Palni Hills, Tamil Nadu, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Elaeocarpus blascoi is an endemic tree species reported only from the Palni Hills in the Western Ghats of Tamil Nadu. It was described from one tree in 1972, and was thought to be extinct till 1999. We had germinated an unidentified plant species in 1990, and this was later identified in 2001 as E. blascoi upon discovery of a mature tree in Vattakanal shola. We describe here the discovery of the mature tree and two of our plantings that have survived over the past 20 years. Our discovery and plantings have been written about in other publications but with partial information. In this note we list out all our experience with this species to provide clarity.
    Attribution
    Robert Stewart & Tanya Balcar, Journal of Threatened Taxa, Vol 9, No 8 (2017); pp. 10623–10625 http://doi.org/10.11609/jott.3083.9.8.10623-10625
  • Title
    Additional record and conservation measures of Ceropegia odorata Nimmo ex J. Graham from Gujarat State, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Ceropegia odorata Nimmo ex J. Graham (Apocynaceae: Asclepiadoideae) a Critically Endangered plant species from India was recorded in Gujarat after about 45 years in Vijaynagar forest of Sabarkantha District (northern Gujarat). It was first collected from Pavagadh in central Gujarat. Long-term conservation and participatory approaches, details on macro- and micro-habitats, associated species, landscape level monitoring programs are suggested for the new recorded locality and hill ranges.
    Attribution
    S.K. Patel, B.L. Punjani, P.R. Desai, V.B. Pandey, Y.S. Chaudhary & P.N. Joshi, Journal of Threatened Taxa, Vol 9, No 8 (2017); pp. 10618–10622 http://doi.org/10.11609/jott.3432.9.8.10618-10622
  • Title
    Wintering of the Grey-headed Lapwing Vanellus cinereus (Aves: Charadriiformes: Charadriidae) in Kerala, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Sightings of Grey-headed Lapwings wintering in Kerala were compiled from different sources. With a total of 77 sightings from 1999–2016 in Kerala the bird, which was earlier thought to be a rare winter visitor, was found to be a frequent visitor to the state. Kole wetland, Vellayani-Punchakkari paddy fields and Kattampally wetlands were the sites in Kerala with fairly regular sightings of the bird. From the records, it was found that they are here from October to April, with a maximum number of sightings in January.
    Attribution
    R. Roshnath, Journal of Threatened Taxa, Vol 9, No 8 (2017); pp. 10613–10617 http://doi.org/10.11609/jott.3145.9.8.10613-10617
  • Title
    Birds of the Kerala Agricultural University campus, Thrissur District, Kerala, India - an update
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    An updated checklist of the birds of the Kerala Agricultural University main campus is presented here. The current checklist includes 172 species in 60 families and 17 orders. The campus avifauna includes two Western Ghats endemic species and three globally threatened species. The Kerala Agricultural University main campus also supports 11 species of birds included in Schedule I of the Wildlife (Protection) Act, 1972 and 16 species that are listed in Appendix II of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Flora and Fauna (CITES). Seasonality chart prepared using eBird is also provided for each of the species.
    Attribution
    K. Abha Manohar, Arjun Ramachandran, M.S. Syamili,E.R. Sreekumar, Nithin Mohan, J. Anjali, Abinand Reddy & P.O. Nameer, Journal of Threatened Taxa, Vol 9, No 8 (2017); pp. 10585–10612 http://doi.org/10.11609/jott.2455.9.8.10585-10612
  • Title
    First report of soft coral Sarcophyton birkelandi Verseveldt, 1978 (Anthozoa: Alcyonacea) in Indian waters from Andaman Islands
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Sarcophyton birkelandi Verseveldt, 1978 is reported as a new record to Indian waters from Andaman Islands. Colony morphology, sclerite structures and measurements were extracted and examined from the surface and coenenchyme of both capitulum and stalk for confirmation of species. Structural differentiation was observed in sclerite shape such as club shaped, needle shaped and spindle shaped with a variety of sizes and orientation pattern.
    Attribution
    Seepana Rajendra, C. Raghunathan, Tamal Mondal & K. Venkataraman, Journal of Threatened Taxa, Vol 9, No 8 (2017); pp. 10577–10580 http://doi.org/10.11609/jott.2285.9.8.10577-10580
  • Title
    Angiosperm diversity in Doaba region of Punjab, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    The angiosperms diversity was studied in Doaba region of Punjab, India. A total of 464 species belonging to 337 genera and 99 families were recorded during this study. Of these, 88% are dicots and the remaining (12%) are monocots. The data contain wild, cultivated and ornamental species. Fabaceae is the most dominant family with 60 species followed by Asteraceae (33), Poaceae (29), Euphorbiaceae (20), Amaranthaceae (18), Cucurbitaceae and Solanaceae (17 each). Amongst all the recorded species, 255 were herbs, 65 shrubs, 85 trees and 59 climbers. Six species have been added to the flora of Punjab. Present investigation has indicated that, Doaba region of Punjab has rich angiosperm diversity and need of the hour is its documentation and conservation.
    Attribution
    Kuljinder Kaur, M.C. Sidhu & A.S. Ahluwalia, Journal of Threatened Taxa, Vol 9, No 8 (2017); pp. 10551–10564 http://doi.org/10.11609/jott.2748.9.8.10551-10564
  • Title
    A reassessment of the avian species diversity in the Eastern Ghats of Tamil Nadu, after the Vernay Survey
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    The Eastern Ghats of Tamil Nadu have been poorly surveyed for birds. The best known bird survey in the Eastern Ghats of Tamil Nadu (EGTN) was by V.S. LaPersonne who carried out the the Surveys in Tamilnadu Eastern Ghats between 08th April, 1929 and 25th July 1929. This was reported by WHistler & Kinnear. Thereafter information about birds in EGTN has come only from checklists published from time to time, by researchers, whose primary focus was not birds. Hence, to fill this lacuna, a comprehensive survey of birds was undertaken in the EGTN from March 2012-–--February 2015. The objectives of the study were to document the avian richness and abundance in EGTN, put them in perspective to the Vernay Survey conducted more than 80 years back, and identify priority sites for bird conservation. The study covered the hills and forests of Tamil Nadu spanning nine districts. In total, 262 species of birds were recorded during the survey. Eight species of birds fall under the threatened category. Species such as Square-tailed Bulbul Hypsipetes (lecocephalus) ganeesa, Rufous Woodpecker Micropternus brachyurus, Asian Fairy Bluebird Irena puella, and Malabar Whistling Thrush Myophonus horsfieldii still persist in the same old sites reported in the Vernay Survey. The top five abundant species were the Red-vented Bulbul Pycnonotus cafer, White-browed Bulbul Pycnonotus luteolus, Red-whiskered Bulbul Pycnonotus jocosus, Common Iora Aegithina tiphia, and Purple-rumped Sunbird Leptocoma zeylonica. The Vaniyar riparian tract in the Shevroys, from its origins in the hills to the Vaniyar dam downstream, is a potential bird conservation site in the Eastern Ghats of Tamil Nadu.
    Attribution
    J. Patrick David, R.J. Ranjit Daniels & Vinoth Balasubramanian, Journal of Threatened Taxa, Vol 9, No 8 (2017); pp. 10538–10550 http://doi.org/10.11609/jott.2763.9.8.10538-10550
  • Title
    Floristic diversity of Bhimashankar Wildlife Sanctuary, northern Western Ghats, Maharashtra, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Bhimashankar Wildlife Sanctuary (BWS) is located on the crestline of the northern Western Ghats in Pune and Thane districts in Maharashtra State. It was notified in October 1985 towards conservation of the state animal of Maharashtra, the Giant Squirrel Ratufa indica ssp. elphinstonii. Although an important protected area in the Western Ghats, due to the lack of a comprehensive report, an assessment of floristic diversity of BWS was done from 2009 to 2016. The results revealed that forest types and microhabitats are diverse in the sanctuary. Major forest types are western subtropical broad leaved hill forest to moist deciduous types with a few included small patches of evergreen forests. The rich flora of the sanctuary is represented by a total of 1,142 angiospermic taxa at species and infraspecific level spread over 619 genera and 124 families. Of these 1,094 taxa are wild, which belong to 118 families and 586 genera. Rest of the taxa are planted (34), and 14 introduced. The taxa are classified as per the APG IV. The wild taxa include 20 magnolids, 285 monocots, one Ceratophyllales and 788 eudicots. Out of these, 217 taxa are Indian endemics; which comprise about 19.84% of the total number of wild taxa (1,094) in the sanctuary and 5.04% of total Indian endemics (4,303). Total 53 taxa are under different threat categories according to IUCN. BWS harbours a significant extent of angiosperms in a very small geographic area.
    Attribution
    Savita Sanjaykumar Rahangdale & Sanjaykumar Ramlal Rahangdale, Journal of Threatened Taxa, Vol 9, No 8 (2017); pp. 10493–10527 http://doi.org/10.11609/jott.3074.9.8.10493-10527