Leading up to the National Moth Week on July 22, we interview some contributors of moth observations.Listen to the first podcast episode with Nagesh O. S. on the IBP blog.

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1974 documents found
  • Title
    Forest ghost moth fauna of northeastern India (Lepidoptera: Hepialidae: Endoclita, Palpifer, and Hepialiscus
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Taxonomic and biological information is reviewed for the forest Hepialidae of northeastern India, a poorly known group of moths in a region known for the global significance of its biodiversity. The taxonomic and biological characteriscs are described for genera known from the northeast - Endoclita, Palpifer, and Hepialiscus. A key is provided for distinguishing these genera and the genus Thitarodes known from nearby Bhutan, China, and Nepal, which is almost certainly present within the borders of India. Taxonomic characteristics are described for 12 species from the northeast along with illustrations of the species and maps of their known distributions. Information on species distributions is extremely fragmentary and it is considered very likely that most species have more extensive distributions than currently documented. The northeastern Indian region represents a center of hepialid diversity comprising three principal distribu on patterns: (i) local endemics, (ii) Himalayan, and (iii) northeastern. Comparison of distribution records and major vegetation types indicate the absence of information on the hepialid fauna for much of the northeast region. The principal challenge for future documentation and assessment of the hepialid fauna for this region, as with any other part of India, is the lack of modern descriptions of type specimens. The inclusion of voucher collections of Hepialidae in future biodiversity surveys of northeastern India is to be strongly encouraged, particularly in the context of current and future environmental impacts affecting the sustainability of forest environments in the region.
  • Title
    Xenomerus orientalis Walker (Hymenoptera: Platygastridae): a new distribution record for India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    The genus Xenomerus Walker (Hymenoptera: Platygastridae) consists of 35 described species worldwide, out of which only four species have been reported so far from India. The species X. orientalis Mikó & Masner is reported for the first time in India from Uttarakhand.
    Attribution
    Kalmesh Managanvi, A.K. Karnatak & M.A. Khan, Journal of Threatened Taxa, Vol 9, No 4 (2017); pp. 10138–10140 http://doi.org/10.11609/jott.2005.9.4.10138-10140
  • Title
    First record of Neojurtina typica from India (Hemiptera: Heteroptera: Pentatomidae)
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    The genus Neojurtina Distant, 1921, represented by the species Neojurtina typica Distant, 1921 (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae: Pentatominae: Pentatomini), is illustrated and redescribed based on the female genitalia. Neojurtina typica is recorded for the first time from India (Meghalaya) and distribution of the species is reviewed based on all the available literature. The present taxonomic placement of the genus Neojurtina is discussed.
    Attribution
    S. Salini, Journal of Threatened Taxa, Vol 9, No 4 (2017); pp. 10133–10137 http://doi.org/10.11609/jott.2777.9.4.10133-10137
  • Title
    A new record of Gunther’s Waspfish Snyderina guentheri (Boulenger, 1889 (Scorpaeniformes: Tetrarogidae) from Visakhapatnam, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Gunther's waspfish, Snyderina guentheri (Boulenger, 1889) was caught depth range of 300 m in the trawl net operated from Visakhapatnam, India. A total of thirty five specimens of length range 85-164 mm TL were collected. It is caught from deeper waters at depths of 300 meters along with members of family Triglidae. This species is characterized by the following morphological characters and colour pattern of this species.
    Attribution
    Muddula Krishna Naranji & Sujatha Kandula, Journal of Threatened Taxa, Vol 9, No 4 (2017); pp. 10130–10132 http://doi.org/10.11609/jott.2879.9.4.10130-10132
  • Title
    The seasonal occurrence of the Whale Shark Rhincodon typus (Smith, 1828) (Orectolobiformes: Rhincodontidae) along the Odisha coast, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    This article gives a description about the seasonal occurrence of Whale Shark in the southern Odisha coast by taking into account of the current observed data and published literatures. The present report claims the sighting of whale sharks during offshore surveys on 13th March 2016 and 15th March 2016, 8 km (19° 15’ 38” N, 85° 01’32” E) and 4.5 km (19º 15’ 69” N, 85° 00’ 58” E) off the coast of Gopalpur Port, Odisha respectively. Most of the earlier reports of whale shark sightings along Odisha coast are from the coastal waters off Rushikulya river mouth or Gopalpur during the month of February-March. Continuous records of whale sharks along southern Odisha coast during February and March suggest the probability of seasonal migration of this giant fish during the period.
    Attribution
    Shesdev Patro, Biraja Kumar Sahu, Chandanlal Parida, Madhusmita Dash & K.C. Sahu, Journal of Threatened Taxa, Vol 9, No 4 (2017); pp. 10125–10129 http://doi.org/10.11609/jott.3165.9.4.10125-10129
  • Title
    Density and obligatory feeding habits of an isolated Golden Jackal Canis aureus L. (Mammalia: Carnivora: Canidae) population in Pirotan Island, Gulf of Kachchh, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Efforts to arrest the decline of carnivorous mammals in isolated ecosystems have received little attention in India. The present study assesses the population density of a small Golden Jackal population, isolated on a water covered Pirotan Island in the Gulf of Kachchh Marine National Park, India. An average of 12 Golden Jackals/km2 was found inhabiting the Island. The scat analysis revealed that the major diet of jackals was crab (89.5±2.36 %) followed by fish (2.7±0.82 %). Only 2.1% of their diets were from the Island source. They have well adapted to manage their water needs from their obligatory feeding habits.
    Attribution
    Kamaraj Ramkumaran, Rethnaraj Chandran, Chowdula Satyanarayana, Kailash Chandra & Tikadar Shyamal, Journal of Threatened Taxa, Vol 9, No 4 (2017); pp. 10121–10124 http://doi.org/10.11609/jott.2988.9.4.10121-10124
  • Title
    Host specificity of some wood-decaying fungi in moist deciduous forests of Kerala, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    The low diversity tropical forest is dominated by host specialized wood decaying fungi (Hymenochaetales, Polyporales) with narrow host range. To understand whether or not wood decaying fungi in a highly diverse tropical moist deciduous forest have any kind of host specialization, sporophores of 22 species of wood decaying fungi were recorded on 17 tree species in three seasons viz., pre monsoon, monsoon and post monsoon from the moist deciduous forests of Peechi-Vazhani Wildlife Sanctuary, Kerala, India. Only two of the 22 species with three or more records showed signs of host specialization. In the case of other fungi, the number of host tree species increased with increasing number of occupied or colonized logs. The findings support the assumption that most of the wood decaying fungi have broad host ranges in highly diverse forest types in the tropics.
    Attribution
    A. Muhammed Iqbal, Kattany Vidyasagaran & Narayan Ganesh, 6pp Journal of Threatened Taxa, Vol 9, No 4 (2017); pp. 10096–10101 http://doi.org/10.11609/jott.3168.9.4.10096-10101
  • Title
    Conservation status assessment and new population record of the threatened Golden Himalayan Spike Phlomoides superba (Royle ex Benth.) Kamelin & Makhm. from Jammu & Kashmir, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    This paper deals with distribution and conservation status of the Golden Himalayan Spike Phlomoides superba (Royle ex Benth.) Kamelin & Makhm. (syn. Eremostachys superba Royle ex Benth.), an endangered herb in India. A new locality report from Jammu & Kashmir along with population status in previously reported localities of occurrence of this species is also provided. Since the species is reported from a very few localities in India and is facing critical threats in the wild, the addition of a new locality holds significance in terms of its declining population status.
    Attribution
    Amber Srivastava, Yash Pal Sharma, O.P. Sharma Vidyarthi & Sunil Kumar Srivastava, Journal of Threatened Taxa, Vol 9, No 4 (2017); pp. 10089–10095 http://doi.org/10.11609/jott.2875.9.4.10089-10095
  • Title
    Livestock and wild herbivores in the western Himalaya: competition or co-existence?
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Pastoralism is among the major land use practices in the Himalaya and the main source of livelihood for local communities. In naturally occurring herbivore populations, the co-occurrence of native species has evolved through evolutionary processes over millions of years which has enabled coexistence. In the modern scenario, however, the intrusion of livestock into the wild habitats impose additional pressure on the limited resources, given that there has been insufficient time for resource partitioning to evolve. Realizing the need to develop a better understanding of wild herbivores and livestock interactions, the present review was compiled. The review demonstrates that a group of similar species using similar habitats and feeding on similar foods leads to more competition. Also, goat/sheep impose a potential threat to the resource of wild herbivores and such resource exploitation by livestock is not compatible with their conservation. Further, wild herbivores shift their habitat to avoid the risk of being exposed to competition or predation. Livestock grazing and associated activities affect the wild herbivores’ habitat use and foraging behaviour, and these are changes that may also affect their survival in the future. There is a prime need to find out the threshold of livestock population which can sustain itself without compromising livestock production and wildlife. High conflict areas need to be identified and compensatory mechanisms should evolve. It is also necessary for ecology to be integrated with an understanding of the social dynamics that influence the status of the resources.
    Attribution
    Syed, Z. & M.S. Khan (2017). Livestock and wild herbivores in the western Himalaya: competition or co-existence? Journal of Threatened Taxa 9(4): 10084–10088; http://doi.org/10.11609/jott.3279.9.4.10084-10088
  • Title
    Traditional home garden agroforestry systems: habitat for conservation of Baya Weaver Ploceus philippinus (Passeriformes: Ploceidae) in Assam, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    The present study was conducted in 18 homegarden agroforestry systems of Assam to assess the role in the conservation of Baya Weaver Ploceus philippinus. Observations were made on the type of host trees, location of host trees, their spatial arrangement pattern, height and diameter of host trees chosen for nesting and the number of complete and helmet stage nests. Trail walks were employed for assessing the encounter rates of predators. A total of 2357 individuals of potential host trees for nesting of P. philippinus were found belonging to Areca catechu (2272), Cocos nucifera (56), Phoenix sylvasticus (13) and Borassus flabellifer (16). According to the spatial arrangement pattern of host trees, among 2272 individuals of A. catechu, 96.5% (n=2192) and 3.5% (n=80) of individuals were arranged in block and row pattern respectively. The other three host trees were arranged in single pattern. Among these 80 individuals of A. catechu planted in row pattern, 47.5% (n=38) had nests (complete and helmet stage) on them. In total, 293 nests (both complete and helmet stage) were observed in A. catechu, out of which, 46.1% (n=135) were complete nests. The other three host trees had nests in various stages of development but none of them were completed by P. philippinus. The encounter rates of predators (arboreal mammals) was significantly higher in block patterns (2.56 ± 0.51) as compared to row patterns (0.53 ± 0.17) of host tree spatial arrangement whereas, the encounter rates of reptiles showed no statistical difference among the two patterns of host tree arrangement. Thus, A. catechu planted in row pattern was the most preferred host tree species for nesting by P. philippinus as compared to the other three host tree species. The height and DBH of A. catechu trees having nests varied from seven to 11 m (7.8 ± 1.11) and 10.5–16.5 cm (12.6 ± 1.4) respectively. The homegarden agroforestry systems provided suitable habitat for survival of P. philippinus as this system has ample water sources, feeding grounds, nesting material and host tree sources and conservation attitudes of the homegarden owners, thus, suggesting that homegarden agroforestry system can be a potential site for conservation of P. philippinus in human-modified land use.
    Attribution
    Yashmita-Ulman, Awadhesh Kumar & Madhubala Sharma, Journal of Threatened Taxa, Vol 9, No 4 (2017); pp. 10076–10083 http://doi.org/10.11609/jott.3090.9.4.10076-10083
  • Title
    Butterflies associated with major forest types in Arunachal Pradesh (eastern Himalaya), India: implications for ecotourism and conservation planning
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    A three year study (from December 2011 to December 2014 and in June 2015) on butterflies covering four major forest sub-types as classified by H.G. Champion & S.K. Seth in 1968 in ‘Forest Types of India’, which occupy 60% of the forest area lying below 2,500m across Arunachal Pradesh State in the eastern Himalaya of India, revealed 415 taxa belonging to six families (Hesperiidae: 74 species of 42 genera; Papilionidae: 37 species of 10 genera; Pieridae: 36 species of 15 genera; Lycaenidae: 85 species of 49 genera; Riodinidae: 7 species of 3 genera & Nymphalidae: 176 species of 71 genera, respectively). These included many endemic and rare species typical of these forest sub-types, i.e., (i) 2B/1S1 Sub-Himalayan Light Alluvial Semi-Evergreen Forest (32 species), (ii) 2B/ C1(a) Assam Alluvial Plains Semi-Evergreen Forests (5 species), (iii) 2B/2S2 Eastern Alluvial Secondary Semi-Evergreen Forests- (15 species) and (iv) 3/1S2 (b) Terminalia-Duabanga (3 species), respectively. The relative number of species and individuals sampled were the highest at altitudes below 500m, and gradually declined as the altitude increased to 2,000m, and above 2,500m species richness declined sharply. The number of species and their relative abundance were the highest during July–August (Monsoon-first peak) and then again in November-December (Autumn-second peak), while the numbers were lowest during winter. These findings suggest that these four forest types are important both for the purpose of ecotourism as well as conservation of endemic and rare taxa found in the eastern Himalaya and northeastern India at altitudes below 2,000m. A complete list of all the taxa sampled is given along with relative abundance status during sampling, Indian Wildlife (Protection) Act, 1972 status, and distribution in different forest types in the state. Ten potential butterfly ecotourism zones are suggested for the state. Planning land-use for biodiversity conservation based on butterfly-forest type associations, by taking forest sub-types as units of conservation, is suggested as an option for the eastern Himalaya.
    Attribution
    Arun P. Singh, Journal of Threatened Taxa, Vol 9, No 4 (2017); pp. 10047–10075 http://doi.org/10.11609/jott.2765.9.4.10047-10075
  • Title
    Migratory and resident birds of Kawadi-Pat wetland
    Type
    Report
    Description
    Kawadi-Pat is a wetland under human impact. Once a paradise of winter migratory birds, one hour distance from Pune city. Now, in spite of filthy environment, we can see some spp of migratory birds. I felt very bad by the state of this wetland. Here is a presentation of whatever I could find that early morning on 24-11-2013.