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4 documents found tagged <i>bubo bengalensis</i> [X]
  • Title
    Broken wing display in an unfledged Indian Eagle Owl Bubo bengalensis
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    A young Bubo bengalensis was encountered in a ravine near Ousteri Lake. It was monitored for a period of 6 months. During this period it showed the broken wing display only once, which is considered to be exclusive to adults in defense of their nests, eggs, or young.
    Attribution
    Ramanujam M.E. (2014). Journal of Threatened Taxa 5(6) pp. 5781-5783; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o3791.5781-3
  • Title
    Ecological effects on morphometric development of the Indian Eagle Owl Bubo bengalensis
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Univariate analysis based on logistic growth curve fitting and multivariate analysis using principle component analysis (PCA) were used to analyze complex patterns and correlations in morphometric data from 16 individuals of the Indian Eagle Owl Bubo bengalensis from the Deccan Plateau. Wing chord length, tarsus length, claw length, beak length, tail length and weight were measured from hatching until fledging (1-58 days old) . A logistic growth curve showed a good fit for all characters. Different characters showed different growth patterns according to their function in the developing nestling. PCA analysis revealed that different morphological characters are loosely coupled together during growth, and this could be attributed to the behavioural ecology of nestlings. By comparing the patterns in our data with data published from southern India, we also show that there is plasticity in the development in these geographically isolated populations.
    Attribution
    Pande S., Dahanukar N. (2011). Journal of Threatened Taxa 4(3) pp. 1677-1685; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o2609.1677-85
  • Title
    The diet of Indian Eagle Owl Bubo bengalensis and its agronomic significance
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    If the importance of wildlife in agricultural pest control through predation can be conveyed, it can play an important role in the conservation of wildlife. However, such a strategy needs to be backed with convincing data. We studied the habitat preference, diet and reproductive behavior of the Indian Eagle Owl (IEO) Bubo bengalensis in order to understand its role in agricultural pest control. The Owls preferred landscapes with a higher percentage of agriculture and fed on rodents, birds, reptiles, arachnids, insects and other prey species. Despite being a generalist feeder, its diet was dominated by agricultural pests, which contributed 88% of the total prey biomass. Out of the 13 rodent prey species, which comprised a major part of the diet, seven were identified as major agricultural pests and were 98% of the total rodent biomass in the diet of the IEO. The dependence of the IEO on rodent pests was further reflected by positive correlation between rodent biomass consumed and the breeding success of the owl. The IEO, therefore, plays a positive role in the biological control of crop pests. However, owls spent a longer duration of time in agricultural habitats, where they also had higher productivity. Thus IEO may be subjected to anthropogenic activities, human contact and interference. Since this owl is still hunted due to superstitious beliefs, scientific evidence elucidating the importance of the IEO in agricultural pest control can be used for its conservation by educating the farming community.
    Attribution
    Pande S., Dahanukar N. (2011). Journal of Threatened Taxa 8(3) pp. 2011-2017; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o2536.2011-7
  • Title
    A preliminary report on the development of young Indian Eagle Owl Bubo bengalensis (Franklin, 1831) in and around Puducherry, southern India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Morphometric, weight and photographic data on the growth patterns of young Bubo bengalensis was obtained in three areas in and around Puducherry. We continuously monitored and observed the growth patterns of nine chicks in total between 10 and 60 days after hatching. Among the morphometric variables, bill and wing chord length showed a mild yet steady increase throughout the observation period, while tarsus length displayed a steep increase till the 20th day, fluctuated till the 40th day and then increased marginally till the 60th day. Body mass showed a steady increase before reaching a plateau between 35 and 45 days, after which only a marginal increase was observed. Chicks were born with whitish natal down. The prejuvenile moult occurred around the 14th or 15th day. Full juvenile plumage was attained by the 35th day and persisted even after 60 days. Morphometric data showed a marked variability, and in this context, ageing of nestlings based on measurements alone may not be accurate and must be complemented with feather moult patterns.
    Attribution
    Ramanujam M.E., Murugavel T. (2009). Journal of Threatened Taxa 10(1) pp. 519-524; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o1762.519-24