Leading up to the National Moth Week on July 22, we interview some contributors of moth observations.Listen to the first podcast episode with Nagesh O. S. on the IBP blog.

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3 documents found tagged <i>gyps bengalensis</i> [X]
  • Title
    Promising trend of in situ breeding of Oriental White-rumped Vulture Gyps bengalensis in Raigad District, Maharashtra, India: conservation implications for re-introduction of ex situ populations
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    The population of Gyps vultures crashed at an alarming rate in India, from 85% since 1985-86 to 0% in 1997-99. There are sporadic records of sightings, wild breeding and captive breeding of Gyps and Neophron Vultures from 2005 to 2010 from various parts of India. We noticed continued, uninterrupted successful nesting of Oriental White-rumped Vultures Gyps bengalensis in their natural habitats in Raigad District, Maharashtra from 2004 to 2011. Their breeding population steadily increased from 10 pairs in 2004-2005 to 22 pairs in 2010-2011 and the nesting success steadily increased from 30% in 2004-2005 to 70% in 2010-2011. We feel that the naturally breeding populations are a must for successful re-introduction of the juvenile captive-bred vultures in the wild, and both in situ and ex situ breeding of vultures should be coordinated till the vulture population increases to an acceptable level and stabilizes in the Indian subcontinent. Identification of natural active nest sites is the foremost requirement for safeguarding the breeding of the Oriental White-rumped Vultures in private land by winning peoples participation.
    Attribution
    Pande S., Mestri P., Deshpande P., Warange A., Mahabal A. (2013). Journal of Threatened Taxa 7(5) pp. 4106-4109; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o3330.4106-9
  • Title
    Impact of kite string injuries and temporal variation in types of injuries and illnesses of White-rumped Vultures of central Gujarat, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Ahmadabad and its surrounding region (Gujarat, India) is an important breeding area for the Critically Endangered White-rumped Vulture Gyps bengalensis, currently with around 60 breeding pairs. The kite flying festival, celebrated on 14 and 15 January, poses a major threat to the vulture. Through rigorous awareness and rescue programs we encountered 108 White-rumped Vultures between January 2009 and August 2012. The vultures were injured due to kite flying (43.9%) and other causes, such as dehydration, visceral gout and illness (56.1%). Considering all encounters, survival rates were higher among vultures with kite string injuries (53.3%) when compared to other causes (36.7%). This was due to a higher proportion of dead-on-arrival encounters in other causes (45.0%) especially when compared to encounters with visceral gout and kite string injuries (2.2%). The survival rates of encounters of live rescued vultures are higher in other causes (66.7%) compared to kite string injuries (54.5%). This is mainly because the majority of live encounters (excluding kite string injuries) are dehydrated fledglings or juveniles which recover well upon administration of intravenous fluids. Encounters of live vultures with kite string injuries involve birds with severe blood loss, incurable infections and stress which result in decreased survival. Most casualties from kite string injuries are due to hypovolumic shock, septic shock and stress.
    Attribution
    Roy A., Shastri K. (2013). Journal of Threatened Taxa 14(5) pp. 4887-4892; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o3451.4887-92
  • Title
    Behavioural and virological studies on a rescued Oriental White-backed Vulture Gyps bengalensis from western Maharashtra, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    An exhausted Indian White-backed Vulture Gyps bengalensis was rescued in Maharashtra State, India. Examination revealed that it was not injured but was emaciated due to starvation. The vulture was fed in captivity by the Forest Department. To rule out the possibility of viral infections, cloacal, tracheal and serum samples were collected from the vulture. They were negative for Avian Influenza (AI) viruses, Newcastle Disease Virus (NDV), Infectious Bursal Disease Virus by virus isolation. We observed neck drooping behavior by vulture when approached by humans. The vulture flew away but after two days, was found dead 60km away, due to electrocution. Our report suggests that electrocution may also be an explanation for the decreasing numbers of vultures in India.
    Attribution
    Pande S., Pandit P., Ponkshe A., Mone R., Pawar S., Mishra A. (2011). Journal of Threatened Taxa 1(3) pp. 1490-1492; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o2471.1490-2