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13 documents found tagged abundance [X]
  • Title
    On the status of the Long-tailed Marmot Marmota caudata (Mammalia: Rodentia: Sciuridae) in Kargil, Ladakh (Indian Trans-Himalaya)
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Two species of marmots occur in India, the Himalayan Marmot Marmota himalayana and the Long-tailed Marmot or Golden Marmot Marmota caudata. Marmots constitute part of the diet of some globally endangered carnivores in the Trans-Himalaya, yet studies on marmots in India are scanty. Besides, the status of the Long-tailed Marmot is still unknown in India. Considering this, a survey was carried out in Rangdum Valley, Kargil between May and July 2011 to collect baseline information on the Long-tailed Marmot. Trails and roads were explored through walk and slow moving vehicle, respectively. The Long-tailed Marmot was found to have a density of 14.31±2.10 per sq.km. and an encounter rate of 2.86±0.42 per km. Most of the observations of Long-tailed Marmot were in hilly areas (77.7%), lower slope (48.8%) and herbaceous meadow (38.0%). The current information is expected to bring concern towards this lesser known species in India.
    Attribution
    Tanveer Ahmed, Mohammad Shoeb, Pankaj Chandan & Afifullah Khan, Journal of Threatened Taxa, Vol 8, No 9 (2016); pp. 9171–9176 http://dx.doi.org/10.11609/jott.2731.8.9.9171-9176
  • Title
    On the Behaviour, abundance, habitat use and potential threats of the Gangetic Dolphin Platanista gangetica in southern West Bengal, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    The Ganga River Dolphin Platanista gangetica Roxburgh, 1801 is a globally endangered cetacean found in the River system of Ganga, Brahmaputra and Meghna in Bangladesh and India. A survey and research were conducted from 2012–2014 to explore the behaviour, abundance, habitat use and potential threats of the Dolphin in the lower, middle and upper stretches of the river Ganga and its tributaries in southern West Bengal. The study recorded different types of surfacing patterns with respect to their age class as well as on diurnal activity pattern of the individual. The adults and sub-adults were found to have different types of surfacing during different hours of the day. The morning and afternoon were observed to be feeding hours of the Dolphin. Multiple potential threats were encountered during the present study such as destructive fishing gears, dumping of solid and municipal waste, industrial effluents, agricultural run-off, construction of water structures, water extraction and reduction of river depth attributed to siltation. These factors contributed to the present study of the river dolphins in the Ganga, which are localised at certain pockets in good number.
    Attribution
    Mahua Roy Chowdhury, Sangita Mitra & Saswati Sen, Journal of Threatened Taxa, Vol 8, No 9 (2016); pp. 9131–9137 http://dx.doi.org/10.11609/jott.1752.8.9.9131-9137
  • Title
    Distribution of vultures in Uttar Pradesh, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    As carrion feeders vultures play an important ecological role.  Counts and qualitative assessments were done over three seasons to assess the richness and abundance of vultures in Uttar Pradesh during 2010–11.  Of nine species found in India, Uttar Pradesh has six: Egyptian Vulture Neophron percnopterus (45.9%), Slender-billed Vulture Gyps tenuirostris (25.4%), Indian Vulture (Long-billed Vulture) Gyps indicus (16.8%), White-rumped Vulture Gyps bengalensis (10.3%), Red-headed Vulture (King Vulture) Sarcogyps calvus (0.8%) and Himalayan Griffon Gyps himalayensis (0.7%).  We observed a total of 1993 adults and 91 juveniles, with the Tarai region having the greatest species richness and abundance.  Nesting tree species included Silk Cotton Bombax ceiba, Teak Tectona grandis, Haldu Haldina cordifolia and Sissoo Dalbergia sissoo.  A qualitative assessment indicated that the vulture population had declined in the past 10–15 years, with the main causes being the use of diclofenac, shortage of food and habitat loss.  Disposal of dead animals was mainly done by removing carcasses to village outskirts, where dogs, crows and egrets compete with vultures.  Such a small number of avian scavengers in a large area like Uttar Pradesh should be protected by ensuring safe and sufficient food, recovery from accidents and rehabilitation, and a protected environment.
    Attribution
    Jha Kaushalendra Kumar (2015). Journal of Threatened Taxa 1(7) pp. 6750-6763; doi:10.11609/jott.1784.6750-6763
  • Title
    Small carnivores of Biligiri Rangaswamy Temple Tiger Reserve, Karnataka, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    During the present study in Biligiri Rangaswamy Temple Tiger Reserve (BRT), nine species of small carnivores viz., Jungle Cat Felis chaus, Rusty-spotted Cat Prionalilurus rubiginosus, Leopard Cat Prionailurus bengalensis, Small Indian Civet Viverricula indica, Asian Palm Civet Paradoxurus hermaphroditus, Striped-necked Mongoose Herpestes vitticollis, Ruddy Mongoose Herpestes smithii, Common Mongoose Herpestes edwardsii and Smooth-coated Otter Lutrogale perspicillata, were recorded using camera-trapping technique, transect walks, and night surveys. Vegetation type strongly influences the presence and abundance of each species. The most sightings of small carnivores occurred in dry deciduous forests. Among all the species, the Asian Palm Civet was the most abundant and was followed by the small Indian Civet. Compared to many other forests or regions in India, the sight records of the Rusty-spotted Cat were relatively higher in BRT. Although we were unable to use statistical methods to search for higher levels of interdependencies between forest types and small carnivore abundance, our study sheds light on patterns of small carnivore distribution in this unique habitat which bridges the Western Ghats and the Eastern Ghats.
    Attribution
    Kumara Honnavalli N., Thorat Ovee, Santhosh Kumar, Sasi R., Ashwin H.P. (2014). Journal of Threatened Taxa 12(6) pp. 6534-6543; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o3766.6534-43
  • Title
    An updated checklist of birds of Sariska Tiger Reserve, Rajasthan, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Surveys were carried out at 10 sites in the buffer and core zones of Sariska Tiger Reserve during 2007-2011. MacKinnon species listing method was used to compile a checklist of birds. A total of 224 bird species was recorded including 36 new records. Ashy Drongo Dicrurus leucophaeus, Marshall Iora Aegithina nigrolutea, Eurasian Eagle Owl Bubo bubo, Brown-headed Barbet Megalaima zeylanica, Indian Nightjar Caprimulgus asiaticus, Long-legged Buzzard Buteo rufinus, Northern Goshawk Accipiter gentilis, Red-necked Falcon Falco chicquera, Pheasant-tailed Jacana Hydrophasianus chirurgus, Red-whiskered Bulbul Pycnonotus jocosus, White-capped Water Redstart Chaimarrornis leucocephalus were some new records. Some important observations are given in detail.
    Attribution
    Sultana A. (2013). Journal of Threatened Taxa 13(5) pp. 4791-4804; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o3215.4791-804
  • Title
    CEPF Western Ghats Special Series: Status of reptiles in Meghamalai and its environs, Western Ghats, Tamil Nadu, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    We update the reptile fauna of Meghamalai area, Western Ghats based on a literature review and a recent study (2006-2008) by SACON. In all, 90 species of reptiles belonging to 53 genera and 14 families were reported from this area, which include 30 (33.3%) species endemic to the Western Ghats. Reptiles of the area shared distribution with all biogeographic zones of India, barring the Trans-Himalaya. High species richness in Meghamalai is due to its broader elevation width, presence of both windward and leeward zones and a variety of forest types. Studies conducted after 2006 added several species to the faunal list of the area, but could not record 16 species reported earlier including Hutton’s Pit Viper Tropidolaemus huttoni and the Blue-bellied Tree Skink Dasia subcaeruleum from the area since 1949. Numerically, several species are currently rare, and changes in land use and land cover could have led to reduction in their abundance and local extinction. It is hoped that the recently declared Meghamalai Wildlife Sanctuary would reduce further degradation of habitats and help conserve biodiversity. Further studies are needed for understanding the ecology of the several species of reptiles found in this and the nearby areas of the Western Ghats.
    Attribution
    Bhupathy S., Sathishkumar N. (2013). Journal of Threatened Taxa 15(5) pp. 4953-4961; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o3595.4953-61
  • Title
    Evaluation of macrobenthic fauna in hill stream environment of Western Himalaya, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    The purpose of this study is to evaluate seasonal occurrence of macro-benthic fauna in the tributaries of river Beas. The seasonal diversity of macrobenthic fauna was calculated in relation with physico-chemical parameters which revealed that benthic diversity is largely controlled by temperature, water current and volume of water. The width and depth of the streams exhibited an inverse relation with benthic fauna. An inverse relation between temperature and benthos was recorded at the sites located at higher elevation whereas a direct relation was inferred at the lower elevation. The peak of benthic fauna was recorded during winter season at all sampling sites. The benthic fauna was mainly represented by eight groups out of which four are highly distributed at all the sites among which Ephemeroptera were most dominating taxa in the River. Simple correlations were applied for benthos and abiotic factors, which revealed that water temperature, dissolved oxygen, alkalinity, depth and width influenced the invertebrate’s distribution and abundance.
    Attribution
    Sharma I., Dhanze R. (2012). Journal of Threatened Taxa 9(4) pp. 2875-2882; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o2725.2875-82
  • Title
    Studies on bird diversity of Overa-Aru Wildlife Sanctuary of Jammu and Kashmir, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    The Overa-Aru Wildlife Sanctuary is a tourist attraction for religious, adventure and wildlife tourism in Jammu and Kashmir, India. The Overa-Aru Sanctuary harbours different species of birds, reptiles and mammals and is home to a large number of plant species. In the present study, checklists of avian fauna, their migratory status, feeding habits, abundance and status, and site-wise population have been documented.
    Attribution
    Khah S.A., Rao R.J, Wani K.A. (2012). Journal of Threatened Taxa 13(4) pp. 3228-3232; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o2899.3228-32
  • Title
    Zooplankton diversity of Loktak Lake, Manipur, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Zooplankton communities of Loktak Lake showed rich and speciose biocoenosis (162 and 142 species), high monthly richness (91 plus or minus 13 and 80 plus or minus 10 species) and by higher similarities (51.1-82.0 and 51.8-78.3 %) and peak richness during winter and autumn over two years of study. Zooplankton (267 plus or minus 41 n/l) formed a significant quantitative component (56.0 plus or minus 6.3 %) of net plankton and showed annual peak abundance during winter. Rotifera and Cladocera are dominant quantitative groups while Copepoda and Rhizopoda are sub-dominant groups. We observed significant annual and monthly variations of zooplankton richness and abundance. This study showed limited influence of individual abiotic factors on zooplankton, with richness showing a significant inverse correlation with water hardness and chloride, and abundance inversely correlated with nitrate. Multiple regressions indicated higher cumulative effects of 15 abiotic factors on richness and abundance. Our results exhibited no definite periodicity of richness and abundance of zooplankton and their constituent groups during two annual cycles. Zooplankton is characterized by highest species diversity (4.172 plus or minus 0.237), higher evenness and lower dominance.
    Attribution
    Sharma B.K., Sharma S. (2011). Journal of Threatened Taxa 5(3) pp. 1745-1755; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o2457.1745-55
  • Title
    Rotifer communities of Deepor Beel, Assam, India: richness, abundance and ecology
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Plankton samples collected from two sampling stations of Deepor Beel (a Ramsar site in Assam, northeastern India) between November 2002 and October 2003, reveal 110 and 100 species of Rotifera, exhibit monthly richness ranging between 43-65 (56 plus or minus 6) and 38-60 (52 plus or minus 7) species and record 48.9-88.1 and 53.1-89.7% community similarities respectively. Rotifera (231 plus or minus 60 and 198 plus or minus 70 n/l) comprise between 48.7 plus or minus 6.1 and 42.6 plus or minus 4.1% of zooplankton abundance at station I and II respectively, and follow trimodal annual patterns with peaks during winter. Brachionidae (90 plus or minus 43, 79 plus or minus 39 n/l) > Lecanidae (45 plus or minus 13, 29 plus or minus 9 n/l) form important quantitative components of Rotifera while Asplanchnidae > Synchaetidae > Trochosphaeridae are other notable families. Lecane > Brachionus > Keratella > Asplanchna > Platyias contribute notably to temporal variations of the rotifers. Asplanchna priodonta, Keratella cochlearis, Platyias quadricornis, Lecane leontina, Polyarthra vulgaris, Keratella tropica and Brachionus falcatus are important species. Analysis of variance comparisons indicate significant temporal variations in richness and abundance of Rotifera between stations and months. The rotifer communities exhibit higher species diversity, higher evenness, lower dominance and lack of quantitative dominance of any individual species. The present results show no definite periodicity of richness and abundance of this group, families or species. Individual abiotic factors register limited influence on richness and abundance while multiple regression exhibits higher cumulative influence of ten abiotic factors on these parameters at both sampling stations.
    Attribution
    Sharma B.K. (2010). Journal of Threatened Taxa 8(2) pp. 1077-1086; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o2411.1077-86
  • Title
    Phytoplankton diversity of two floodplain lakes (pats) of Manipur, northeastern India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Phytoplankton communities of Utra and Waithou pats (floodplain lakes) of Manipur, studied during November 2002 - October 2004, revealed 62 and 61 species, and indicated monthly richness between 27-45 (38 � plus or minus 4) and 32-46 (39 � plus or minus 4) species respectively with distinct qualitative importance of Chlorophyta (29 � plus or minus 4 and 28 � plus or minus 3 species). Phytoplankton (154 � plus or minus 31 n/l and 164 � plus or minus 34 n/l) comprised between 43.8 � plus or minus 3.0 % and 41.5 � plus or minus 3.0 % of net plankton abundance respectively of these two lakes. Chlorophyta (115 � plus or minus 23 n/l and 113 � plus or minus 21 n/l), the dominant quantitative component (74.4 � plus or minus 4.1% and 67.5 � plus or minus 4.8%), indicated importance of the demids. Bacillariophyta (33 � plus or minus 9 n/l and 37 � plus or minus 12 n/l) formed sub-dominant group, and Dinophyta > Euglenophyta > Chrysophyta showed very low densities. Various abiotic factors registered relatively limited influence on richness and abundance of phytoplankton as well as on abundance of individual groups in Utra Pat than in Waithou Pat. Multiple regression depicted higher cumulative influence of fifteen abiotic factors on the stated biotic parameters in these pats. Both richness and abundance of Phytoplankton recorded significant monthly variations, showed insignificant temporal variations between two lakes and followed indefinite annual patterns in each pat. Phytoplankton communities of the sampled pats are characterized by higher species diversity, higher evenness and lower dominance.
    Attribution
    Sharma B.K. (2010). Journal of Threatened Taxa 11(2) pp. 1273-1281; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o2427.1273-81
  • Title
    Microcrustacea (Crustacea: Branchiopoda) of Deepor Beel, Assam, India: richness, abundance and ecology
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Plankton samples collected from two sampling stations of Deepor Beel, an important floodplain lake of Assam and a Ramsar site of India, revealed 51 species of Microcrustacea and showed qualitative dominance of Cladocera (45 species). Microcrustacea comprised a significant quantitative component (45.6 � plus or minus 5.8 and 50.8 � plus or minus 4.5 %) of zooplankton and exhibited bimodal and trimodal annual patterns with peaks during winter. Cladocera > Copepoda are important quantitative groups. ANOVA registered significant variation in species richness and abundance of Microcrustacea over time and between stations. Richness and abundance were inversely correlated with water temperature and rainfall, and positively correlated with specific conductivity and dissolved oxygen. Multiple regression registered significantly higher cumulative effects of ten abiotic factors on these two parameters. Our results are characterized by higher species diversity, higher evenness and lower dominance of Microcrustacea and show lack of distinct quantitative importance of individual species.
    Attribution
    Sharma B.K., Sharma S. (2009). Journal of Threatened Taxa 8(1) pp. 411-418; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o2169.411-8