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2 documents found tagged anaimalai hills [X]
  • Title
    Diversity and management of wild mammals in tea gardens in the rainforest regions of the Western Ghats, India: A case study from a tea estate in the Anaimalai Hills
    Type
    Report
    Description
    In many places in the Western Ghats hill ranges ofsouthern India, rainforest has been clear-felled in orderto grow tea plantations. Such plantations now exist as islands of agriculture surrounded by forest tracts, most of which are protected as wildlife sanctuaries. Wereport a case study from one such tea garden. We observed a diversity of wild mammals, both herbivores and carnivores, usingopen grass patches, swamps andvegetation along streams in the tea gar den. Largemammals were observed to forage in such areas andreturn to the adjoining forests. Small mammals wereeither resident or used stream vegetation as a corridor to move from oneside of the forest to the opposite side. Dhole (Cuon alpinus) often preyed on sambar (Cervus unicolor) and even denned twice in the estate. We also observed a minimal human–animal conflict in the area. Problems such as stealing of meat from sambar killsmade by dhole, could be overcome by awareness. We propose that such areas can be effectively managedsuch that it could facilitate movement of wild mammals with least damage to the commercial activity related to tea. Such a wildlife management strategy canbecome a model that could be followed in tea-growing areas throughout the Western Ghats.
    Attribution
    H. N. Kumara, M. Ananda Kumar, A. K. Sharma, H. S. Sushma, Mridula Singh and Mewa Singh
  • Title
    Male Influx, Infanticide, and Female Transfer inMacaca radiata radiata
    Type
    Report
    Description
    In bonnet macaques, males usually disperse between groups and females remain philopatric, but researchers have reported female transfer. We reporta rare case of male influx during the mating season in our bonnet macaquestudy group in the Anaimalai Hills. The density of bonnet macaques in thestudy region was unusually high. The study group had a single, crippled adultmale with a long tenure and 5 adult females. During the mating season, adult females approached and mated with outgroup males, and then several malesentered the group. The adult male left the group without any resistance. Theincoming males mated with 3 receptive females, forcibly mated with 2 lactating females, and attacked and killed 2 infants. During the influx, 2 outgroup females joined the group. The data suggest that male influxes providean opportunity for infanticide and female transfer, which can have importantfitness consequences even in species in which they rarely occur.
    Attribution
    Mewa Singh, H. N. Kumara, M. Ananda Kumar, Mridula Singh, and Matthew Cooper