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12 documents found tagged assam [X]
  • Title
    A first note on foliicolous lichens of Assam, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    A first note on foliicolous lichens of Assam enumerating 26 species belonging to 15 genera and eight families are provided. Four species viz., Bacidina apiahica, Byssoloma chlorinum, Calopadia fusca and Strigula nitidula are reported for the first time from Assam. A number of rare species are present, including Aulaxina uniseptata, Calenia aspidota and Psorotheciopsis patellarioides.
    Attribution
    Pooja Gupta & G.P. Sinha, Journal of Threatened Taxa, Vol 8, No 7 (2016); pp. 9014–9023 http://dx.doi.org/10.11609/jott.1882.8.7.9014-9023
  • Title
    Nesting of Lesser Whistling-Duck Dendrocygna javanica (Horsfield, 1821) (Aves: Anseriformes: Anatidae) and broken-wing distraction display at Kamrup District, Assam, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    We observed 13 nesting attempts of the Lesser Whistling-Duck during 2011–2014 at Rani, Kamrup District in Assam, India. Failure in egg laying by the ducks and nest raiding by Grey Mongoose were recorded, while the breeding success was 38.5%. For the first time we witnessed broken wing distraction display exhibited by this species as an anti-predator strategy, which we have recorded here.
    Attribution
    Sachin P. Ranade & Vibhu Prakash, Journal of Threatened Taxa, Vol 8, No 5 (2016); pp. 8824–8826 http://dx.doi.org/10.11609/jott.2817.8.5.8824-8826
  • Title
    Description of a new species of the genus Litus Haliday (Hymenoptera: Chalcidoidea: Mymaridae) from India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    A new species of the genus Litus Haliday (Chalcidoidea: Mymaridae), Litus assamensis sp. nov., is described from Assam, India.  A key to the Indian species of the genus is also given. 
    Attribution
    Rehmat Tabassum, Anis Shoeba Binte; Journal of Threatened Taxa Vol 8, No 3 (2016) 26/3/2016; pp. 8615-8617; 10.11609/jott.1934.8.3.8615-8617
  • Title
    Recent record of a rarely recorded species, the Veined Palmer Hidari bhawani de Nicéville, 1888 (Lepidoptera: Hesperiidae: Aeromachini) from Jorhat, Assam, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    The paper reports the occurrence of a ‘very rare’ species, the  Veined Palmer or the Cresentric Skipper, Hidari bhawani from Jorhat, Assam during March and November’2014,after 6 decades in India. The genera Hidari occurs as only three species that are restricted to southeast Asia and H. bhawani being only species for this genera represented in India 
    Attribution
    Singh Arun P. (2015). Journal of Threatened Taxa 1(7) pp. 6839-6840; doi:10.11609/jott.1798.6839-6840
  • Title
    A quantification of damage and assessment of economic loss due to crop raiding by Asian Elephant Elephas maximus (Mammalia: Proboscidea: Elephantidae): a case study of Manas National Park, Assam, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    A study was carried out in Manas National Park, Assam in northeastern India between 2007 and 2009 to understand the magnitude of human-elephant conflict through a quantification of damage and assessment of economic loss. A cluster of six villages adjacent to the Park was selected for this study. Five major agricultural crops were grown during the study period of which three were raided by elephants: winter paddy, autumn paddy and pulses. Paddy was the principle crop central to the farmers’ subsistence. Winter paddy was the most cultivated crop and autumn paddy was the least cultivated. The incidence rate of crop raiding was highest for autumn paddy and lowest for pulses. Overall economic loss due to crop raiding was negligible, however at the individual farmer level, it was quite high. The study revealed that human-elephant conflict is not so severe, indicating ample opportunity for human-elephant coexistence in the region. Crop fields adjacent to the Park were particularly vulnerable to crop raiding which necessitates creation of a buffer zone. The frequency of raiding and the extent of damage was found to be significantly less in crop fields which were guarded by farmers. This was due to traditional crop guarding practices being followed in the region, the strengthening of which could effectively reduce annual crop loss and thus human-elephant conflict could be minimized to a large extent.
    Attribution
    Nath Naba K., Dutta Sushil K., Das Jyoti P., Lahkar Bibhuti P. (2015). Journal of Threatened Taxa 2(7) pp. 6853-6863; doi:10.11609/jott.1847.6853-6863
  • Title
    New distribution records of tortoises (Chelonia: Testudinidae) from Barak Valley, Assam, northeastern india with notes on ecology and vernacular traditional taxonomy
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    India is home to five species of tortoises of which the two endangered species are found in northeastern India. We report for first time new distributional records of Indotestudo elongata and additional site records of Manouria emys phayrei from 17 different locations in the Barak Valley region of Assam. 
    Attribution
    Das Kulendra Chandra, Gupta Abhik (2015). Journal of Threatened Taxa 3(7) pp. 7017-7023; doi:10.11609/jott.1902.7017-7023
  • Title
    The family Rubiaceae in southern Assam with special reference to endemic and rediscovered plant taxa
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Analysis of diversity, distribution and endemism of the family Rubiaceae for southern Assam has been made. The analyses are based on field observations in the three districts, viz., Cachar, Hailakandi and Karimganj, as well as data from existing collections and literature. The present study records 90 taxa recorded from southern Assam, four of which are endemic. Chassalia curviflora (Wall.) Thwaites var. ellipsoides Hook. f. and Mussaenda keenanii Hook.f. are rediscovered after a gap of 140 years. Mussaenda corymbosa Roxb. is reported for the first time from northeastern India, while Chassalia staintonii (H.Hara) Deb and Mondal is reported as a new record for Assam.
    Attribution
    Barbhuiya H.A., Dutta B.K., Das A.K., Baishya A.K. (2014). Journal of Threatened Taxa 4(6) pp. 5649-5659; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o3117.5649-59
  • Title
    A preliminary checklist of butterflies recorded from Jeypore-Dehing forest, eastern Assam, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    The paper describes some of the rare butterfly species recorded during February 2010-October 2011 in the lowland semi-evergreen Jeypore rainforest of upper Assam along with a preliminary checklist of the area. Altogether, 292 species were recorded based on the survey conducted in different seasons. Important sightings include the report of White Punch longicaudata, Pale Striped Dawnfly Capilia zennara, Blue Quaker Pithecops fulgens etc and range extension of Andaman Yellow-banded Flat Celaenorrhinus andamanicus hanna to northeastern India.
    Attribution
    Gogoi M.J. (2013). Journal of Threatened Taxa 2(5) pp. 3684-3696; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o3022.3684-96
  • Title
    Seroprevalence of Hepatitis A virus infection in non-human primates in Assam, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    The present study investigated 37 serum samples of non-human primates in Assam State Zoo and the Department of Forest and Environment, Govt. of Assam for seroprevalence of hepatitis A virus infection during the period from December, 2007 to November, 2009. Four serum samples were also collected from animal keepers of the zoo to investigate transmission of the disease to the attendants working with these primates. Competitive ELISA was performed using hepatitis A virus ELISA kit (Wanti Hep. AV) to detect hepatitis A virus antibody in serum samples. Ten (27.21%) of the non-human primate samples and three (75%) human samples had detectable anti-hepatitis A virus antibodies. Living status of the non-human primates (Free living) was a high potential risk for hepatitis A virus infection. Seroprevalence of hepatitis A virus infection had significant difference between free living non-human primates and captive non-human primates (P less than 0.05). No significant difference (p=0.86) was seen between male and female non-human primates
    Attribution
    Nath B.G., Chakraborty A., Sarma D.K., Rahman T., Boro P.K. (2013). Journal of Threatened Taxa 12(5) pp. 4722-4724; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o3121.4722-4
  • Title
    Site records of softshell turtles (Chelonia: Trionychidae) from Barak Valley, Assam, northeastern India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    We report for the first time the occurrence of four species of Trionychid turtles Nilssonia gangetica, N. hurum, Chitra indica and Lissemys punctata andersonii from 57 sites in the Barak Valley region of Assam, northeastern India. Sites of occurrence include rivers, small streams, floodplain lakes and ox-bows.
    Attribution
    Das K.C., Gupta A. (2011). Journal of Threatened Taxa 4(3) pp. 1722-1726; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o2487.1722-6
  • Title
    Badis dibruensis, a new species (Teleostei: Badidae) from northeastern India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    A new species of the genus Badis Hamilton is described from Dibru River, Dibrugarh, Brahmaputra basin in Assam, India. The species has the following combination of characters: a conspicuous black blotch covering the superficial part of the cleithrum above pectoral fin base, a small oval-shaped black blotch on the middle of caudal fin, two predorsal bones, interorbital width 9.9-15.0, upper jaw length 6.1-6.9, lower jaw length 7.1-8.3 and orbital diameter 7.6-9.4 % SL. The species differs from its nearest congeners, B. badis, B. kanabos and B. tuivaiei by the absence of dark black or brown vertical bars on sides. A key to species of Badis of India is provided.
    Attribution
    Geetakumari Kh., Vishwanath W. (2010). Journal of Threatened Taxa 1(2) pp. 644-647; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o2156.644-7
  • Title
    An assessment of human-elephant conflict in Manas National Park, Assam, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    An assessment of human-elephant conflict was carried out in the fringe villages around Manas National Park, Assam during 2005-06. The available forest department conflict records since 1991 onwards were also incorporated during analysis. Conflict was intense in the months of July-August and was mostly concentrated along the forest boundary areas, decreasing with distance from the Park. Crop damage occurred during two seasons; paddy (the major crop) suffered the most due to raiding. Crop maturity and frequency of raiding were positively correlated. Single bull elephants were involved in conflicts more frequently (59%) than female herds (41%), while herds were involved in majority of crop raiding cases. Of the single elephants, 88% were makhnas and 11.9% were tuskers. The average herd size recorded was 8 individuals, with group size ranging up to 16. Mitigation measures presently adopted involve traditional drive-away techniques including making noise by shouting, drum beating, bursting fire crackers and firing gun shots into the air, and using torch light, pelting stones and throwing burning torches. Kunkis have been used in severe cases. Machans are used for guarding the crops. Combinations of methods are most effective. Family herds were easily deflected, while single bulls were difficult to ward off. Affected villagers have suggested methods like regular patrolling (39%) by the Forest Department officials along the Park boundary, erection of a concrete wall (18%) along the Park boundary, electric fencing (13%), simply drive away (13%), culling (11%) and lighting the Park boundary during night hours (6%). Attempts to reduce conflict by changing the traditional cropping pattern by introducing some elephant-repellent alternative cash crops (e.g. lemon and chilli) are under experiment.
    Attribution
    Nath N.K., Lahkar B.P., Brahma N., Dey S., Das J.P, Sarma P.K., Talukdar B.K. (2009). Journal of Threatened Taxa 6(1) pp. 309-316; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o1821.309-16