Leading up to the National Moth Week on July 22, we interview some contributors of moth observations.Listen to the first podcast episode with Nagesh O. S. on the IBP blog.

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6 documents found tagged behaviour [X]
  • Title
    Behaviour of Short-finned Pilot Whales Globicephala macrorhynchus (Gray, 1846) (Mammalia: Cetartiodactyla: Delphinidae) in the southeastern Arabian Sea
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    We report the presence and behaviour of a pod of short-finned pilot whale Globicephala macrorhynchus in the southeastern Arabian Sea. The pod was observed in the southeastern side of Minicoy Island, in the Nine degree channel (09°219′23′′N;74°39′529′′E) on 03.02.2013. Later, on 06.02.2013,the same pod of pilot whales were observed near Kalpeni Island (10°02′402′′N; 73°39′579′′E) 130 km northwest of the previous location. The average length of the whales was estimated as 550 cm and weight as approximately 1200 kg. They were travelling in a northwesterly direction. The pod size of the whales sighted was twelve and several species specific behaviour such as side rolling, spyhopping, lobtailing, peduncle arching and movement patterns such as synchronous travelling and logging could be observed. The occurrence of scars and injuries on the body of four whales in the pod are also reported.
    Attribution
    Sajikumar Kurichithara K., Ragesh Nadakkal, Mohamed Kolliyil S. (2014). Journal of Threatened Taxa 11(6) pp. 6488-6492; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o3659.6488-92
  • Title
    Ethological studies of the Veined Octopus Amphioctopus marinates (Taki) (Cephalopoda: Octopodidae) in captivity, Kerala, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Five Veined Octopus Amphioctopus marginatus (Taki), collected from Vizhinjam Bay in the Thiruvananthapuram District of Kerala, India were kept in aquariums to study their behaviour in captivity. Primary and secondary defence mechanisms studied included crypsis, hiding and escape behaviour. Deimatic behaviour was used by captive animals when camouflage failed and they were threatened. Crawling behaviour to escape from the aquarium was observed in all specimens. Stilt walking and bi-pedal locomotion were also observed. As a defence behaviour, A. marginatus used aquarium rocks to protect the soft underside of their bodies. A. marginatus demonstrated tool use of coconut shells to make protective shelters, carrying the shells for future use. A female specimen also selected a coconut shell for egg laying and performed parental care by continuously cleaning and aerating her eggs with her arms and by squirting jets of water over the eggs.
    Attribution
    Sreeja V., Bijukumar A. (2013). Journal of Threatened Taxa 10(5) pp. 4492-4497; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o3256.4492-7
  • Title
    Captive propagation of threatened primates - the example of the Lion-tailed Macaque Macaca silenus
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Many conservation-oriented breeding programs are not likely to reach their goal of establishing self-sustaining populations. Some zoo biologists propagate to reconsider zoo-based conservation policies and strategies. The Lion-tailed Macaque is a flagship species for in situ conservation and a high priority species in captive propagation. This article reviews the captive management history of the Lion-tailed Macaque, identifies management patterns that might have negatively influenced the development of the programs, and proposes to use this analysis to initiate a new management perspective. In the North American captive Lion-tailed Macaque population under the Species Survival Plan (SSP), the strong reduction in population size and group sizes due to space problems might have contributed to a decrease in population viability. The population over two decades has declined from almost 300 to less than 100 individuals. In the European population under the European Endangered Species Program (EEP), population size was not limited and larger groups were advocated. The population grew slowly but steadily to a present size of more than 350 individuals over about 23 years. The effective population size has remained low in both SSP and EEP populations. A general conceptual framework that focuses on individuals and their phenotypes for in situ and ex situ conservation recently developed by field conservationists is briefly introduced. It is used to suggest improvements in the management of the Lion-tailed Macaque. It is concluded that the size and structure of a breeding population is to be decided so as to provide conditions and materials for successful reproduction rather than by the available zoo space only. For this, large groups and populations with representation of all age-sex classes are advocated. This would result in a further reduction in the number of species kept in zoos. It is indicated that zoo biology needs to develop new concepts that include a large spectrum of concepts of biology and knowledge about the adaptive potential of animal species under altered and fragmented conditions.
    Attribution
    Kaumanns W., Singh M., Silwa A. (2013). Journal of Threatened Taxa 14(5) pp. 4825-4839; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o3625.4825-39
  • Title
    Notes on the nesting behaviour of Yellow-footed Green Pigeon Treron phoenicoptera (Columbidae) at Jeypore Reserve Forest, Assam, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    We surveyed five nesting colonies of Yellow-footed Green Pigeon at Jeypore Reserve forest to study their nesting behaviour during two breeding seasons in 2008 and 2009. We observed the birds in five closely-watched nests and studied their behaviour starting from pair formation till hatching of squabs. Pair formation generally starts from the month of April followed by nest building and incubation, with ultimately, hatching of squabs during May, which continues up to the month of June. Both sexes share the duty of nest building and incubation. Breeding pairs took four shifting intervals during incubation period at a time interval of about 2-5 hrs in each shift. Incubation period ranges between 20-23 days.
    Attribution
    Devi O.S, Saikia P.K (2012). Journal of Threatened Taxa 3(4) pp. 2470-2475; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o2715.2470-5
  • Title
    Effect of human feeding on the road mortality of Rhesus Macaques on National Highway - 7 routed along Pench Tiger Reserve, Madhya Pradesh, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    In Hindu mythology, Hanuman is worshipped as the monkey god and therefore there is a great reverence for macaques all across the country. Hindu devotees consider it their sacred duty to feed macaques along road, temples, parks and other public areas. Unfortunately, such food provisioning alters the habitat, food choice and behaviour of macaques. We studied the impact of feeding by humans on Rhesus Macaque Macaca mulatta feeding behaviour, distribution and also assessed the increased risk of accidents in the 11km road stretch of National Highway passing through Kanha-Pench corridor, from August 2009 to July 2010. Seasonal changes in macaque distribution and group sizes were assessed based on foot and vehicle transects. The numbers of road kills were monitored in early morning and late evening hours for different seasons. Five groups of macaques were occupying a minimum of 1.1 to a maximum of 1.7km stretch, together covering about 7.3km of road. Group size varied significantly in relation to the availability of food on the road. During the study, 54 macaques succumbed to road accidents. Maximum roadkill occurred during summer because of the greater inflow of tourists. Unless concerted efforts are made to increase awareness among people of the hazards of road-side feeding, incidences of macaque mortality are likely to increase.
    Attribution
    Pragatheesh A. (2011). Journal of Threatened Taxa 4(3) pp. 1656-1662; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o2669.1656-62
  • Title
    First underwater sighting and preliminary behavioural observations of Dugongs (Dugong dug on) in the wild from Indian waters, Andaman Islands
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Sighting of Dugongs in Indian waters have become increasingly rare due to their declining numbers. Further, there have been no reports on underwater observations on dugongs in the wild from these waters. During our surveys in the Andaman and Nicobar Islands, we sighted three independent immature sized dugongs. These individuals were sighted at Havelock and Neil Island and Kodiaghat in South Andaman Island. In this paper, we report dugong sightings, present preliminary behavioural observations and emphasise the need to initiate community based conservation along with monitoring of their habitats.
    Attribution
    Dsouza E., Patankar V. (2009). Journal of Threatened Taxa 1(1) pp. 49-53; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o2002.49-53