Leading up to the National Moth Week on July 22, we interview some contributors of moth observations.Listen to the first podcast episode with Nagesh O. S. on the IBP blog.

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22 documents found tagged biodiversity [X]
  • Title
    Forest ghost moth fauna of northeastern India (Lepidoptera: Hepialidae: Endoclita, Palpifer, and Hepialiscus
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Taxonomic and biological information is reviewed for the forest Hepialidae of northeastern India, a poorly known group of moths in a region known for the global significance of its biodiversity. The taxonomic and biological characteriscs are described for genera known from the northeast - Endoclita, Palpifer, and Hepialiscus. A key is provided for distinguishing these genera and the genus Thitarodes known from nearby Bhutan, China, and Nepal, which is almost certainly present within the borders of India. Taxonomic characteristics are described for 12 species from the northeast along with illustrations of the species and maps of their known distributions. Information on species distributions is extremely fragmentary and it is considered very likely that most species have more extensive distributions than currently documented. The northeastern Indian region represents a center of hepialid diversity comprising three principal distribu on patterns: (i) local endemics, (ii) Himalayan, and (iii) northeastern. Comparison of distribution records and major vegetation types indicate the absence of information on the hepialid fauna for much of the northeast region. The principal challenge for future documentation and assessment of the hepialid fauna for this region, as with any other part of India, is the lack of modern descriptions of type specimens. The inclusion of voucher collections of Hepialidae in future biodiversity surveys of northeastern India is to be strongly encouraged, particularly in the context of current and future environmental impacts affecting the sustainability of forest environments in the region.
  • Title
    A report on some butterflies (Lepidoptera) from Ladakh in Jammu & Kashmir and Lahaul in Himachal Pradesh, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Forty-two (42) species of butterflies were recorded from a short survey of Ladakh and Lahaul in the inner Himalaya in Jammu & Kashmir and Himachal Pradesh. Here, we provide location and altitude records for these species, data on their abundance, photo-documentation of the life cycle of Pieris deota and P. brassicae as well as the first published record of a larval host plant for P. deota. Twelve (12) of these species are protected under Schedule II of the Indian Wildlife (Protection) Act, 1972.
    Attribution
    Sanjay Sondhi, Balakrishnan Valappil, Yash Sondhi & Anchal Sondhi, Journal of Threatened Taxa, Vol 9, No 3 (2017); pp. 9971–9987 http://dx.doi.org/10.11609/jott.3024.9.3.9971-9987
  • Title
    Forest ghost moth fauna of northeastern India (Lepidoptera: Hepialidae: Endoclita, Palpifer, and Hepialiscus)
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Taxonomic and biological information is reviewed for the forest Hepialidae of northeastern India, a poorly known group of moths in a region known for the global significance of its biodiversity. The taxonomic and biological characteristics are described for genera known from the northeast - Endoclita, Palpifer, and Hepialiscus. A key is provided for distinguishing these genera and the genus Thitarodes known from nearby Bhutan, China, and Nepal, which is almost certainly present within the borders of India. Taxonomic characteristics are described for 12 species from the northeast along with illustrations of the species and maps of their known distributions. Information on species distributions is extremely fragmentary and it is considered very likely that most species have more extensive distributions than currently documented. The northeastern Indian region represents a center of hepialid diversity comprising three principal distribution patterns: (i) local endemics, (ii) Himalayan, and (iii) northeastern. Comparison of distribution records and major vegetation types indicate the absence of information on the hepialid fauna for much of the northeast region. The principal challenge for future documentation and assessment of the hepialid fauna for this region, as with any other part of India, is the lack of modern descriptions of type specimens. The inclusion of voucher collections of Hepialidae in future biodiversity surveys of northeastern India is to be strongly encouraged, particularly in the context of current and future environmental impacts affecting the sustainability of forest environments in the region.
    Attribution
    John R. Grehan & Vijay Anand Ismavel, Journal of Threatened Taxa, Vol 9, No 3 (2017); pp. 9940–9955 http://dx.doi.org/10.11609/jott.3030.9.3.9940-9955
  • Title
    save environment by amc
    Type
    Miscellaneous
    Description
    Dear friends, we are the artistes, writers, short film makers our team named áchinthya media creations from bengaluru, we concentrate mainly on initiatives, awerness short movies, we have done a short movie regarding our environment the url is https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X1Kr7RCyS_o pls go through it and give your comments and response... thankyou gururaj madhavarao team head achinthya media creations. bengaluru
  • Title
    A partial checklist of moths (Lepidoptera) of Dehradun, Mussoorie and Devalsari in Garhwal, Uttarakhand, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Two-hundred-and-forty-eight species of moths were recorded during surveys conducted over 40 nights in Dehradun and Mussoorie in Dehradun District and Devalsari in Tehri Garhwal District in Uttarakhand.
    Attribution
    Yash Sondhi & Sanjay Sondhi, Journal of Threatened Taxa, Vol 8, No 5 (2016); pp. 8756–8776 http://dx.doi.org/10.11609/jott.2814.8.5.8756-8776
  • Title
    How the local community views wildlife conservation: a case of Hastinapur Wildlife Sanctuary, Uttar Pradesh, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    A study was conducted to assess the local community’s attitudes towards wildlife conservation in Hastinapur Wildlife Sanctuary (HWS), Uttar Pradesh, India. It is the largest sanctuary in the state and under the highest anthropogenic pressure. People engage in fishing, livestock grazing, fuel wood/fodder collection, cash cropping of cucurbits in the sandy river banks for sustenance and commercial extraction of sand and grass for construction. These activities threaten the survival of threatened species like Swamp Deer Rucervus duvaucelii, Gangetic Dolphin Platanista gangetica, Smooth-coated Otter Lutrogale perspicillata and Gharial Gavialis gangeticus. Interviews were conducted with heads of randomly selected families and ‘yes/no’ opinions were taken. Questions included direct statements on biodiversity status and relationship with the Sanctuary resources. Data was classified in percent values and it was found that there is no difference in people’s perception on increase, decrease or stability of biodiversity. Further, a majority of people find life around a protected area disadvantageous, or with dismal advantages. Building on this premise the study suggests that a better share in development and alternative livelihood options for the local community of HWS can decrease their dependence on natural resources and improve conservation as a favourable option in the present perceptions of the people.
    Attribution
    Khan Mohd. Shahnawaz, Abbasi Faiza (2015). Journal of Threatened Taxa 2(7) pp. 6934-6939; doi:10.11609/jott.1856.6934-6939
  • Title
    Further new additions to the lichen mycota of Andhra Pradesh, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    During the lichen exploration in Rayalaseema region of Andhra Pradesh several interesting lichen taxa were collected of which 10 species are reported here as new records for the state. The species includes Biatorella conspersa (Biatorellaceae), Caloplaca bassiae, C. poliotera (Teloschistaceae), Dimelaena tenuis (Physciaceae), Lecanora chlarotera, L. helva, L. interjecta, L. psuedistera (Lecanoraceae), Pertusaria melastomella (Pertusariaceae) and Porina tetracerae (Porinaceae). These taxa / species have been enumerated along with their characteristic features and distributional notes.
    Attribution
    Mohabe S., Reddy A.M., Devi B.A., Nayaka S., Shankar P.C. (2014). Journal of Threatened Taxa 8(6) pp. 6122-6126; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o3726.6122-6
  • Title
    Comparison of insect biodiversity between organic and conventional plantations in Kodagu, Karnataka, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    We undertook a comparative analysis of ground insects and fruit eating butterflies on 29 different plantations in Kodagu District of Karnataka which is one of the rich biodiversity zones of the Western Ghats. These included organic and conventional coffee and cardamom plantations using different levels of chemical fertilizers and pesticides. A total number of 457 ground insect species were collected using pit-fall traps which included 92 species of ants and 123 species of beetles, among other insect taxa that we measured. Similarly, 25 species of butterflies belonging to the family Nymphalidae were collected using bait traps. We found a clear negative effect on the ground insect species diversity (Shannon index) and evenness (Shannon evenness index) in pesticide treated plantations as compared to the organic plantations. A similar negative effect was observed for butterfly diversity in plantations using pesticides. Our results corroborate the value of organic plantations in supporting higher levels of biodiversity.
    Attribution
    Mone S., Kusha K.M., Jathanna D., Ali M., Goel A. (2014). Journal of Threatened Taxa 9(6) pp. 6186-6194; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o3778.6186-94
  • Title
    Dragonflies and damselflies (Insecta: Odonata) of Tripura, northeastern India with a pictorial catalogue.
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    A survey of Odonata was conducted in four reserve forests, three wildlife sanctuaries and three unclassified natural areas of Tripura, northeastern India from 2008 to 2012, from May to August.  A total of 53 species belonging to 37 genera under nine families of Zygoptera (damselflies) and Anisoptera (dragonflies) were recorded in five years from 1370 points by direct search.  This included 25 species, 16 genera and five families reported as new records for the state.  A list of the species, number of specimens examined, their habitats, local and IUCN status, and worldwide distribution are provided.  A pictorial catalogue of adults of the recorded species is also provided.  
    Attribution
    Majumder Joydeb, Bhattacharjee Partha Pratim, Agarwala Basant K. (2014). Journal of Threatened Taxa 14(6) pp. 6683-6702; doi:10.11609/jott.1719.6683-6702
  • Title
    Coastal marine fish biodiversity along the western coast of India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    This paper presents distribution records of 184 fish species surveyed in rocky reef habitats on the west coast of India. Surveys were completed in situ by SCUBA diving. Twelve species appear to be new records for India based on previous literature including Fishbase. These are in the families Apogonidae, Pempheridae, Cirrhitidae, Pomacentridae, Acanthuridae, Balistidae, Monocanthidae, and Ostraciidae. Most fish species for which there are IUCN assessments were in the Least Concern category. However, one species was Endangered, two species Vulnerable, and three species Near Threatened. Several Data Deficient species were also recorded, which presents opportunities for research to strengthen conservation.
    Attribution
    Sluka R.D. (2013). Journal of Threatened Taxa 1(5) pp. 3574-3579; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o3187.118
  • Title
    Status review of Rocky plateaus in the northern Western Ghats and Konkan region of Maharashtra, India with recommendations for conservation and management
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Rocky plateaus in the northern Western Ghats and Konkan region are specialized habitats belonging to the general habitat category of Rock Outcrops. Their distribution and classification is presented here, with details of microclimate and edaphic features. Microhabitats on the rocky plateaus have been described along with characteristic species assemblages and changes in them due to biotic pressure. Ecological assessment of representative sites show high species richness and diversity (H). A review of current knowledge about endemic flora and fauna on the rocky plateaus shows a large number of endemic species of flora and fauna, of which many are regionally assessed as threatened. Localized diversification within floral and faunal genera is common and indicates active speciation. Most localities except those within protected areas are affected by biotic pressures and there is no specific legal protection for their rich biodiversity. The paper suggests needs for future research on the habitat and recommends conservation and management actions based upon the ecology of the habitat.
    Attribution
    Watve A. (2013). Journal of Threatened Taxa 5(5) pp. 3935-3962; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o3372.3935-62
  • Title
    Diversity of scorpion fauna of Saswad-Jejuri, Pune District, Maharashtra, western India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Our paper deals with the diversity of the scorpion fauna of Saswad-Jejuri region in western India, and highlights the conservation implications of quantitative studies. Eight species of scorpions from five genera and three families are recorded in 10 microhabitats. Some of these areas are categorized as ‘wastelands’ and hence are vulnerable for land use modifications. The interdependence of such microhabitats and their neglected inhabitants like scorpions is highlighted in this study. This information provides a baseline biological data for further demographic and ecological studies and stresses the need for impact assessment prior to undertaking developmental projects in ‘wastelands’, since arachnids exhibit restricted movements and are vulnerable to habitat modification.
    Attribution
    Pande S., Bastawade D., Padhye A., Pawashe A. (2012). Journal of Threatened Taxa 2(4) pp. 2381-2389; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o2910.2381-9