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3 documents found tagged biomass [X]
  • Title
    Diet composition of Golden Jackals Canis aureus (Mammalia: Carnivora: Canidae) in Van Vihar National Park, India, a small enclosed area.
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Food habits of Golden Jackals were estimated by an analysis of 200 scats in Van Vihar National Park, India, a small park of 4.45km2 with a very high density of jackals and ungulates.  A total of 10 items including fruits (40.74%), vegetative matter (24.38%), Chital (21.61%), Nilgai (9.57%), rodent (1.54%), birds (1.23%), Sambar (0.62%) and Wild Pig (0.31%) were consumed.  We estimated relative biomass consumption for the top potential ungulate prey and found that for every 100kg of potential prey killed by jackals, 89.4kg came from Chital and 10.6kg came from Nilgai calves.  The impact that predation can have on the ungulate population in an enclosed area is discussed. 
    Attribution
    Prerna S., Edgaonkar Advait, Dubey Yogesh (2015). Journal of Threatened Taxa 8(7) pp. 7422-7427; doi:10.11609/jott.2109.7422-7427
  • Title
    Status of Golden Jackal Canis aureus and ungulates in a small enclosed area- Van Vihar National Park, Madhya Pradesh, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    We estimated densities of Golden Jackals and five ungulate species in Van Vihar National Park, Madhya Pradesh, India.  It is an enclosed area of about 4.45km², out of which 3.5km² is available for free ranging animals.  Twenty-six transects with a combined length of 22.6km and an effort of 50.2km were walked.  A total of 1079 animal detections belonging to six different species were made.  The density of jackals was (17±3.8SE)/km2. Among the ungulates, chital had the highest density (118±18.8SE)/km2 followed by Sambar (34.1±6.9 SE)/km2, Nilgai (13.1±2.8SE)/km2, Blackbuck (6.6±1.5 SE)/km2 and Wild Pig (3.7±0.8 SE)/km2.  The ungulate biomass was found to be (12979.2±2463.26 SE)kg/km2.  Chital biomass was the highest at (5574.2±886.58 SE)kg/km2, followed by Sambar biomass of (4569.4±913.75 SE)kg/km2, Nilgai (2358±523.24 SE)kg/km2, Blackbuck (211.2±66.18 SE)kg/km2 and Wild Pig (118.4±28.37 SE)kg/km2.  The sex ratio was calculated and most ungulates had female-biased adult sex ratio. 
    Attribution
    Prerna S., Edgaonkar Advait, Dubey Yogesh (2015). Journal of Threatened Taxa 8(7) pp. 7416-7421; doi:10.11609/jott.2107.7416-7421
  • Title
    The time budget and behavioural traits of young and adult Indian Eagle Owl Bubo bengalensis (Franklin, 1831) (Aves: Strigiformes: Strigidae) in and around a nesting site: a preliminary report
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    A family of the Indian Eagle Owl Bubo bengalensis was monitored at their nest site at Nanmangalam Reserve Forest on the outskirts of Chennai City from 5 January to 8 March 2011.  Various behavioural patterns were identified and the time spent on each activity was noted.  All three types of subjects (viz.: breeding male, brooding/incubating female and young) showed different behavioural characteristics. In the breeding female, high intensity activities were incubation, brooding, vigilance and out of sight (construed to be out hunting) and low intensity activities comprised comfort movements, feeding, pellet regurgitation, feeding young, prey delivery and disturbed at the nest.  In the young, high intensity activities were resting and moving, while low intensity activities were feeding, pellet regurgitation and wing flapping.  In the male, the bulk of time was spent in vigilance and the other high intensity activity was out of sight (construed to be hunting).  Low intensity activities included comfort movements and prey delivery. The male hunted more than the female.  Forty-five prey items were delivered by the two parents and these items were identified to the species or generic level. 
    Attribution
    Ramanujam M. Eric (2015). Journal of Threatened Taxa 14(7) pp. 8139-8147; doi:10.11609/jott.2429.7.14.8139-8147