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23 documents found tagged checklist [X]
  • Title
    Checklist of terebrantian thrips (Insecta: Thysanoptera) recorded from India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    A consolidated systematic list of 333 species of terebrantian thrips, belonging to 118 genera (Insecta: Thysanoptera) recorded so far from India, is provided in this article. The list reveals that the family Thripidae has the lion’s share of 307 species, while Aeolothripidae, Melanthripidae, Merothripidae and Stenurothripidae contain very few species. Further, analysis of the present study shows that around 40% of the listed 333 terebrantian species appear to be endemic based on the comparison of Indian fauna with that of the published data of thrips of adjoining regions. Reports on the occurrence of exotic flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande) and Neohydatothrips samayunkur (Kudo) are of concern to the country, as they are notorious for damage to the cultivated plants.
    Attribution
    R.R. Rachana & R. Varatharajan, Journal of Threatened Taxa, Vol 9, No 1 (2017); pp. 9748–9755http://dx.doi.org/10.11609/jott.2705.9.1.9748-9755
  • Title
    An updated checklist of shrimps on the Indian coast
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    This study reports an updated checklist of marine shrimps found along the Indian coast, including the Lakshadweep and the Andaman & Nicobar Islands. A total of 364 species classified under 128 genera belonging to the order Decapoda is reported, thus adding 27 species to the existing checklist of 337 species. Marine shrimps are classified under two suborders of the order Decapoda, viz., Dendrobranchiata and Pleocyemata, and the two suborders account for 155 (42.6 %) and 209 species (57.4 %) of these 364 species, respectively. Pleocyemata is represented by three infraorders, viz., Axiidea, Caridea and Stenopodidea, while Caridea has a maximum of 199 reported species. Among the 12 superfamilies, Penaeoidea contributed to 38.13% (135 species) followed by Paleaemonidea with 18.07% (64 species). All other superfamilies were found to contribute less than 12%. Superfamilies, Bresilloidea and Psalidopodoidea had only single species representatives (0.28% each). The final list was compiled after reviewing all existing literature including monographs, catalogues, checklists, websites and fishery reports. The scientific names were validated with the World Register of Marine Species (WoRMS) database. A total of 25 issues were identified from the previous checklist out of which 19 species have been updated with the correct, accepted names and six species have been removed from the previous list.
    Attribution
    Vijay Kumar Deepak Samuel, Chemmencheri Ramakrishnan Sreeraj, Pandian Krishnan, Chermapandi Parthiban, Veeramuthu Sekar, Kanagaraj Chamundeeswari, Titus Immanuel, Patro Shesdev, Ramachandran Purvaja & Ramachandran Ramesh, Journal of Threatened Taxa, Vol 8, No 7 (2016); pp. 8977–8988 http://dx.doi.org/10.11609/jott.2628.8.7.8977-8988
  • Title
    Avifauna of Chamba District, Himachal Pradesh, India with emphasis on Kalatop-Khajjiar Wildlife Sanctuary and its surroundings
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    The avifaunal diversity of Chamba District of Himachal Pradesh with emphasis on Kalatop-Khajjiar Wildlife Sanctuary and its surrounding was observed for a period of one year between 2012 and 2013. We observed 95 species of birds belonging to 12 orders and 40 families. Of this diversity, 41 species were abundant to common, 34 occasional and 20 rare. Most species were resident (83 species, including two species whose population increased during winters) and the rest were migrants (including nine winter migrating species and three summer migrating species). A total of 302 species of birds have been reported from Chamba District between 1884 and present. Analysis of recent published literature in conjunction with the present study reveals that 178 species of birds have been reported from Chamba District since 2000. The present study reports 11 new records for the district.
    Attribution
    Shah Tariq Ahmed, Ahuja Vishal, Anandam Martina, Srinivasulu Chelmala (2016). Journal of Threatened Taxa 1(8) pp. 8333-8357; doi:10.11609/jott.1774.8.1.8333-8357
  • Title
    A checklist of the flowering plants of Katerniaghat Wildlife Sanctuary, Uttar Pradesh, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Katerniaghat Wildlife Sanctuary, a tropical moist deciduous forest along the Indo-Nepal boarder comprises of 778 species of angiosperms, out of which 613 species are dicots under 386 genera and 91 families and 165 species are monocots under 103 genera and 23 families.  It contains 82 species that are in cultivation and/or growing as alien invasives.  The species include 149 trees, 81 shrubs, 445 herbs and 103 climbers.  Fabaceae with 100 species and Poaceae with 65 species occupy the first position in dicots and monocots, respectively.  Cyperus with 14 species has been found to be the largest genus represented while 355 genera are represented by solitary species.  The present study enumerates all species of flowering plants occurring in the sanctuary area with their correct name along with first citation and some important references pertaining to the flora of the study area.  Important synonyms have also been provided.  For majority of species the representative voucher specimens have also been supplied.  The paper also briefly deals with the vegetation types of the area. The outcome of the work is based on extensive field survey of the area conducted during 2008–2011, study of literature and examination of specimens of earlier collections housed at BSA, BSIP, CDRI and LWG.
    Attribution
    Kumar Anoop, Bajpai Omesh, Mishra Ashish Kumar, Sahu Nayan, Behera Soumit Kumar, Bargali Surendra Singh, Chaudhary Lal Babu (2015). Journal of Threatened Taxa 7(7) pp. 7309-7408; doi:10.11609/jott.2076.7309-7408
  • Title
    A preliminary checklist of the fishes of Yercaud, Shevroy Hills, Eastern Ghats, Tamil Nadu, southern India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Twenty-one species of fishes were recorded in Yercaud Lake and the surrounding hill streams during five surveys conducted from May 2011 to August 2012.  Of the 21 species, 19 were recorded in Yercaud Lake, 10 in the stream leading to Kiliyur Falls and six and eight respectively in the Manjakuttai and Puthur hill streams.  One translocated species (Gibelion catla) and two exotics (Poecilia reticulata and Oreochromis mossambicus) were recorded.  Only one species Cirrhinus cirrhosus is listed as threatened in the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.
    Attribution
    Ramanujam M. Eric (2015). Journal of Threatened Taxa 9(7) pp. 7595-7601; doi:10.11609/jott.2189.7595-7601
  • Title
    A new species of Lissodynerus Giordani Soika (Hymenoptera: Vespidae: Eumeninae) from Rutland Island, southern Andaman, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Lissodynerus rutlandicus sp. nov. is described from Rutland Island, southern Andaman, India.  A checklist of the world species of Lissodynerus is also provided.  
    Attribution
    Kumar P. Girish, Srinivasan G., Carpenter J. M. (2015). Journal of Threatened Taxa 10(7) pp. 7664-7667; doi:10.11609/jott.2227.7664-7667
  • Title
    Description of a new species of Leptochilus (Neoleptochilus) Blüthgen, 1961 (Hymenoptera: Vespidae: Eumeninae) from India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    A new species, Leptochilus (Neoleptochilus) hassani is described from India and compared with similar already described species: Leptochilus (Neoleptochilus) insitivus Gusenleitner, 1976 and L. (N.) umerolatus Gusenleitner, 2006.  A checklist of the species of Leptochilus (Neoleptochilus) from the Indian subcontinent is also provided. 
    Attribution
    Kumar P. Girish, Carpenter J. M. (2015). Journal of Threatened Taxa 11(7) pp. 7786-7790; doi:10.11609/jott.2322.7786-7790
  • Title
    Spiders of Kerala Agricultural University Campus, Thrissur, Kerala, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    A total of 86 species of spiders belonging to 56 genera of 20 families have been recorded from the Kerala Agricultural University (KAU) campus, Thrissur, Kerala, southern India.  This represents 5.1% of the total spiders’ species and 33.33% of the total families of spiders recorded in India.  The dominant spider family at KAU campus is Araneidae with 18 species of nine genera. Salticidae is represented by 14 species of 13 genera.  Out of 252 endemic spiders of India, 16 have been reported from KAU campus.  Guild structure analysis shows spiders belonging to seven types of feeding guilds present in KAU campus.  Orb-web builders are the dominant feeding guild accounting for 34%, followed by stalkers (22%), ground runners (20%), ambushers (8%), scattered line weavers (8%), foliage runners (7%) and sheet-web builders (1%). 
    Attribution
    Adarsh C. K., Nameer P. O. (2015). Journal of Threatened Taxa 15(7) pp. 8288-8295; doi:10.11609/jott.2468.7.15.8288-8295
  • Title
    Diversity, threats and conservation of catfish fauna of the Krishna River, Sangli District, Maharashtra, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    The diversity of freshwater catfish species of the Krishna River, Sangli District was studied from June 2009 to July 2012. The study area covered 105km from Karad City where the Koyna tributary joins the Krishna River up to Mhaishal, the state border of Maharashtra. It was divided into three streams for convenience, i.e., the upper stream starts from Karad and goes up to Takari, the middle stream from Takari to Bhilawadi and downstream from Bhilawadi to Mhaishal. A total of 13 species of catfish belonging to five families and 10 genera were recorded. The Bagridae family was dominant with six species, whereas Siluridae, Schilbidae and Clariidae had two species each and Sisoridae with one species. We have provided range extension for an endemic and threatened sisorid catfish Glyptothorax poonaensis. The occurrence and distribution of catfishes was more or less equal in number along the study area. The maximum number of species recorded was nine from the upper stream, whereas the middle and down streams had eight and seven species respectively. The distribution of catfish along the Krishna River system may be due to the slow and steady state water movement and its width that ensure the continuous availability of nutrition. It is suggested that the Krishna River would be a suitable habitat for the conservation of freshwater catfish if the threats are minimized.
    Attribution
    Kumbar S.M., Lad S.B. (2014). Journal of Threatened Taxa 1(6) pp. 5362-5367; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o3394.5362-7
  • Title
    On the little-known hyporheic biodiversity of India, with annotated checklist of copepods and bathynellaceans (Crustacea) and a note on the disastrous implications of indiscriminate sand mining
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    The vast and ecologically diversified hyporheic realm and the adjacent riparian areas of India have received scant attention from the standpoint of biodiversity studies. Analysis of about 2500 samples collected from the alluvial sediments of certain rivers and streams, besides some bores in the riparian zone, mainly in the coastal deltaic belt of the rivers Krishna and Godavari in Andhra Pradesh State during 2000-2012 yielded 41 copepod and bathynellacean species. Of these, 31 new species have been formally described during the ongoing studies whereas the remainder are previously known ones. An annotated checklist of all these taxa is presented, giving the type locality and other localities of occurrence, methods of sampling, chief references, and also some taxonomic and/or ecological remarks wherever necessary. The harpacticoid copepod family Parastenocarididae and the eumalacostracan order Bathynellacea are two significant, major groups of stygofauna that have been recorded for the first time from India. Both these groups and also some cyclopoid copepods have clear-cut Gondwanan lineages, representing the remnants of unique ancient fauna that require urgent attention from conservationists in order that the overall evolutionary history of the Indian biota is preserved. A note is also added on the devastating influence of the ongoing rampant sand mining activity on the hyporheic biodiversity.
    Attribution
    Reddy Y.R. (2014). Journal of Threatened Taxa 1(6) pp. 5315-5326; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o3734.5315-26
  • Title
    Freshwater Ostracoda (Crustacea) of India - a checklist
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Based on review of earlier literatures on freshwater Ostracoda of India, 152 valid species belonging to 38 genera, five families and two super families are recorded. The study of freshwater Ostracoda in India is still limited. The present study emphasizes that there is a need for further revision of this group because most are not described in detail, which contributes to their uncertain status. 
    Attribution
    Karuthapandi M., Rao D.V., Innocent B. Xavier (2014). Journal of Threatened Taxa 12(6) pp. 6576-6581; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o3682.6576-81
  • Title
    Diversity and field status of lianas in Tripura, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    A checklist of lianas in Tripura, India was prepared which enumerates about 60 species of lianas in the state. In this present paper, diversity of lianas in Tripura was analyzed by field exploration from October 2010 to February 2013.  Out of the total 60 species enumerated, 34 species are provided with their phenology and places of occurrence . Field photographs are also given to facilitate their easy identification. Other 26 species could not be traced in the field and are represented only by herbarium specimens.  
    Attribution
    Darlong Lalawmkima, Bhattacharyya Debjyoti (2014). Journal of Threatened Taxa 14(6) pp. 6703-6710; doi:10.11609/jott.1720.6703-6710