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2 documents found tagged colour change [X]
  • Title
    Observations on a gynochromatic (?) male of the dragonfly, Rhodothemis rufa (Rambur, 1842) (Odonata: Libellulidae)
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    The dragonfly Rhodothemis rufa exhibits a conspicuous sexual dimorphism in its body colour.  The mature male is characterized by the homogenous striking brilliant red body while the mature female is dull brown with a prominent mid-dorsal light yellow streak running from the top of the head through the thorax and down to the fifth segment of the abdomen.  The sexes can easily be identified from quite a long distance.  On 7 November 2012, we observed the unusual sight of a female Rhodothemis rufa chasing another female and forming a tandem link which was followed by copulation.  This peculiar reproductive behavior instigated us to net the specimen.  On inspection we  found that although it appeared a female, it had well developed external male genitalia in the form of the secondary copulatory apparatus on the venter of the second and third abdomen, a pair of coxites on the ninth abdominal tergum and an additional infra anal appendage at the terminal tip of the abdomen.  The testes contained a large number of lobules filled with mature spermatozoa, and the vasa differentia also contained mature sperms.  The sperm sac was filled with sperms embedded in seminal fluid.  Observations indicate that this could be a rare case of a gynochromatic male of Rhodothemis rufa which has retained the colour patterning of the female even after sexual maturity and concomitantly exhibiting active sexual behaviour, although the case of it being a subadult male which has yet to attain its typical red coloration cannot be ruled out.  
    Attribution
    Andrew Raymond J. (2015). Journal of Threatened Taxa 3(7) pp. 7007-7010; doi:10.11609/jott.1900.7007-7010
  • Title
    Ecological observations on the Indian Spiny-tailed Lizard Saara hardwickii (Gray, 1827) (Reptilia: Squamata: Agamidae) in Tal Chhapar Wildlife Sanctuary, Rajasthan, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Observations on the Indian Spiny-tailed Lizard Saara hardwickii (Gray, 1827) were undertaken in Tal Chhapar Wildlife Sanctuary, Rajasthan, India during the monsoons (July) following quadrat sampling that was time-constrained. The study revealed that the area is one of the preferable habitats for the species. A population analysis showed that the relative abundance of the subadults was higher, followed by juveniles and adults during the study period. The beginning of activity of the lizards was found to vary over the study period depending on prevailing weather conditions. The activity pattern was bimodal, except across rain events. The study revealed two important ecological findings about these lizards; complete sealing of burrow during rains which differed from partial sealing on normal days and complete diurnal cycle of body colour changes during the monsoon. Feeding was the predominant activity of this lizard followed by basking, resting and chasing each other. The adult lizards were found to be strictly herbivorous, in spite of an abundance of insects available in the area during the period. Subadults and juveniles were found to eat both plant parts, as well as insects. Microhabitat use such as inside grass clumps was found to be higher followed by barren ground, under shade and on stones.
    Attribution
    Das S.K., Dookia S., Das K., Dutta S.K. (2013). Journal of Threatened Taxa 1(5) pp. 3516-3526; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o2806.484