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50 documents found tagged conservation [X]
  • Title
    Foraging of the Indian Short-nosed Fruit Bat Cynopterus sphinx on banana in shops and on the pieces dropped by monkeys at a temple
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    The Indian Short-nosed Fruit Bat Cynopterus sphinx fed on the pieces of banana fruit that were dropped by monkeys on the tower of a temple and in nearby shops. The monkeys obtained fruits from devotees and shop owners. The peak number of bat visits occurred during pre- and post- midnight hours at the tower and shops, respectively, coinciding with the lights off situation and reduced human disturbance. The bats landed on bunches of ripe bananas hanging in the front of shops. The number of bat landings on the tower was greater than that in the shops. The overall number of bat visits were higher during October when compared to other periods of the year. This may be due to the occurrence of more festivals during October. Our study is an example of opportunistic feeding, in which banana pieces dropped while monkeys were feeding on them were eaten by the bats.
    Attribution
    A. Rathinakumar, S. Baskaran & G. Marimuthu, Journal of Threatened Taxa, Vol 8, No 13 (2016); pp. 9579–9583 http://dx.doi.org/10.11609/jott.2622.8.13.9579-9583
  • Title
    Reappearance of the rare Shingle Urchin Colobocentrotus (Podophora) atratus (Camarodonta: Echinometridae) after eight decades from the rocky shore of Kodiyaghat (Port Blair), South Andaman Islands, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    The present work is aimed at facilitating conservation efforts of a rare species of sea urchin ( Colobocentrotus atratus) reported nearly eight decades after its initial description by Bell (1887) and later by Clarke (1925) from the coastal waters of south Andaman Islands. Recently, during a three years study (2011-14) on the macrobenthic epifauna along the south Andaman coast, five live specimens of C. atratuswere recorded from Kodiyaghat (11 031'532''N; 092 043'457'' E), south Andaman Islands. Available information shows that this species has reappeared in the south Andaman Islands seventy nine years after the citation by Sastry (1994) collected in the year 1935. The disappearance of this species from the literature in the intermittent years and a sparse population in coastal reaches of south Andaman Islands at present suggest that this species makes a candidate taxa for inclusion in the list of ‘endangered’ or ‘vulnerable’ Indian marine species following IUCN Red List criteria to Wild species.
    Attribution
    Vikas Pandey & T. Ganesh, Journal of Threatened Taxa, Vol 8, No 11 (2016); pp. 9377–9380 http://dx.doi.org/10.11609/jott.2406.8.11.9377-9380
  • Title
    Heavy metal distribution in mangrove sediment cores from selected sites along western coast of India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Sediment cores were collected from four different mangrove areas of northern Kerala and southern Karnataka, western coast of India. The cores were analysed for the concentration of five heavy metals (Pb, Ni, Zn, Cu Fe) using Atomic Absorption Spectrometry. The levels of heavy metals in the present study from all the four sediment cores were in the order Fe > Pb > Zn > Ni > Cu and the mean concentrations of each elements in different cores were comparable. According to Sediment Quality Guidelines (SQG), the mangrove sediments analysed here were moderately contaminated with Ni and heavily contaminated with Pb. The increased concentration of Ni and Pb in the sediments might be due to their atmospheric deposition or water discharge from different far away sources since the areas selected for study were not disturbed by direct anthropogenic impacts. Elevated levels of Fe which is considered to be a common phenomenon in mangrove sediments have also been found in the present study. Heavy metal levels in sediments showed statistically significant correlations with pH, calcium carbonate and organic matter. This suggests the influence of physico-chemical parameters on the adsorption, deposition and persistence of heavy metals in mangrove sediments. The heavy metal concentration and the pollution status of the mangroves of west coast, especially the areas selected in this work are less studied before. Hence the data provide from the present baseline study would be further helpful in remediation and management of mangrove ecosystem.
    Attribution
    P. Vidya & Rajashekhar K. Patil, Journal of Threatened Taxa, Vol 8, No 11 (2016); pp. 9356–9364 http://dx.doi.org/10.11609/jott.1978.8.11.9356-9364
  • Title
    Indigenous ornamental freshwater ichthyofauna of the Sundarban Biosphere Reserve, India: status and prospects
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Ornamental fishes are the most popular pet throughout the world and high demand for these fishes has made them an important component of the world fish trade. India contributes a very meager percentage to the world ornamental fish trade; but considering the high ichthyofaunal diversity it has the potential to compete with the world’s leading ornamental fish producers in the near future. Sundarban Biosphere Reserve has abundant waterbodies with rich fish diversity. Although some research has been carried out on ichthyofaunal resources of the Sundarban; detailed documentation on freshwater indigenous ornamental ichthyofaunal resources of this region is still not available. To fill this knowledge gap, the present study has been conducted to list the indigenous ornamental ichthyofaunal resources of the Sundarban Biosphere Reserve along with their conservation status and their prospective utilization for improved livelihood of local communities. Eighty four species belonging to 11 orders, 28 families and 59 genera were collected from the study area with species representing the order Cypriniformes dominating the ichthyofauna. Nine species have been listed as Near Threatened in the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species™. Indigenous fish species of the Sundarban having great potential to support domestic as well as the international ornamental fish trade from India in near future. The ornamental fish species would also be able to generate alternate livelihood options for the impecunious communities of the Sundarban. However, serious concern must also be paid to the conservation of these fish species as some of them are under near threatened categories of IUCN Red list.
    Attribution
    Sandipan Gupta, Sourabh Kumar Dubey, Raman Kumar Trivedi, Bimal Kinkar Chand & Samir Banerjee, Journal of Threatened Taxa, Vol 8, No 9 (2016); pp. 9144–9154 http://dx.doi.org/10.11609/jott.1888.8.9.9144-9154
  • Title
    A century later: Tricolored Pied Flat Coladenia indrani uposathra Fruhstorfer, 1911 (Hesperiidae: Pyrginae) and Crenulate Oakblue Apporasa atkinsoni Hewitson, 1869 (Lycaenidae: Theclinae) reported from Manipur, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    The present paper reports the rediscovery of the Tricolored Pied Flat Coladenia indrani uposathra Fruhstorfer, 1911 and Crenulated Oakblue Apporasa atkinsoni Hewitson, 1869 after about 99 years after they were sighted by Tytler (1915) in Irang river and Sebong of Manipur, North East India. C. i. uposathra was sighted a Keibul Lamjao National Park (KLNP) and Heibok hills of Imphal valley on 4th and 16th May 2014 and A. atkinsoni was sighted Munnom village at Yaingangpokpi Lokchao Wildlife Sanctuary (YLWS) on 8th December 2015. A. atkinsoni is protected under schedule II of Indian (Wildlife) Protection Act 1972. The rediscovery of such very rare species in Manipur shows that more survey is needed in hills and valley regions of Manipur to know the butterfly fauna of the region.
    Attribution
    Baleshwor Singh Soibam, Harmenn Huidrom & Jatishwor Singh Irungbam, Journal of Threatened Taxa, Vol 8, No 7 (2016); pp. 9030–9033 http://dx.doi.org/10.11609/jott.2732.8.7.9030-9033
  • Title
    An assessment of human-elephant conflict and associated ecological and demographic factors in Nilambur, Western Ghats of Kerala, southern India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Elephant conservation carries cost in the form of human-elephant conflict and affects the wellbeing of people living near ecologically important areas. Conflicts impart serious challenges towards the survival of Asian Elephants, which are categorized as Endangered in the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Issues of wildlife conservation are least addressed in areas with less restricted categories of protection. Hence an attempt was made to evaluate the intensity of elephant conflict and factors associated with its occurrence in villages with forest fringes of North and South Forest Divisions of Nilambur, Kerala, southern India. It was hypothesized that variables such as number of houses, area of village, livestock population, forest frontage, and presence of water source along the forest boundary abutting the village to be the underlying correlates of conflict. Field studies were conducted fortnightly from June 2014 to May 2015, by visiting farms and households of 17 selected forest fringe villages. Observational methods, questionnaire surveys and secondary data collection were employed for this purpose. A total of 277 incidents of crop depredation, 12 incidents of property damage, three human injuries, and one human death due to conflict were recorded during this period. Crop raiding was highest during post monsoon season and it was low during pre-monsoon and monsoon seasons. Multiple linear regression results suggest that forest frontage and livestock population were significant predictors of conflict incidence. Information regarding the prime causes of conflict will be helpful for planning strategies for the establishment of appropriate mitigation methods. The present study serves as baseline information which will be helpful for formulating prospective management plans.
    Attribution
    C.K. Rohini, T. Aravindan, P.A. Vinayan, M. Ashokkumar & K.S. Anoop Das, Journal of Threatened Taxa, Vol 8, No 7 (2016); pp. 8970–8976 http://dx.doi.org/10.11609/jott.2536.8.7.8970-8976
  • Title
    A checklist of avifauna from Malgaon-Bagayat and Malvan towns of Sindhudurg District, Maharashtra, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    The present work was carried out in Malgaon-Bagayat (16009’04.35”N & 73033’04.7”E) and Malvan Taluka (16005’00”N & 73030’00”E) of Sindhudurg District. The paper represents the first document on birds as there are no published records from Sindhudurg District. The study was conducted for a period of two years to explore the avifauna as no records have been published yet from this area. A total of 101 species of birds belonging to 17 orders and 45 families and were recorded in the study areas inhabiting different types of habitats. The Order Passeriformes contributed the maximum species (44.9%) followed by Pelecaniformes (9.2%), Charadriiformes (8.2%) and Accipitriformes (6.1%). The species such as the Asian Paradise Flycatcher, Common Hoopoe, and Pied Kingfisher were observed only once in the study area. The common occurrence of the Near Threatened Malabar Pied Hornbill in Bagayat signifies the ornithological importance of this site. Long-term studies on distribution and abundance are required to prepare a conservation plan for avifauna in Sindhudurg District. The data generated can be considered as baseline data for future conservation and management of existing species.
    Attribution
    Mayura Khot, Journal of Threatened Taxa, Vol 8, No 6 (2016); pp. 8909–8918 http://dx.doi.org/10.11609/jott.1706.8.6.8909-8918
  • Title
    Magnolia lanuginosa (Wall.) Figlar & Noot. in West Khasi Hills of Meghalaya, northeastern India: re-collection and implications for conservation
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Magnolia lanuginosa (Wall.) Figlar & Noot. [= Michelia lanuginosa Wall.], a rare tree species of Meghalaya, is restricted to the West Khasi Hills District, Meghalaya. The species was considered to have become extinct from the state. The present paper reports a recent re-collection of the species from four locations in the West Khasi Hills after a lapse of almost 100 years. In addition, the population structure, regeneration status and the threat to the species are also discussed so as to develop effective strategies for its conservation.
    Attribution
    Mir Aabid Hussain, Iralu Viheno, Pao Ngakhainii Trune, Chaudhury Gunjana, Khonglah Clarence G, Chaudhary Kanhaiya Lal, Tiwari Brijesh Kumar, Upadhaya Krishna (2016). Journal of Threatened Taxa 1(8) pp. 8398-8402; doi:10.11609/jott.2242.8.1.8398-8402
  • Title
    Status and population of vultures in Moyar Valley, southern India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Four species of vultures were surveyed using road transects in two parts of the Moyar Valley, three of these are Critically Endangered by IUCN criteria and one is Endangered. The vulture study was done for the first time in Nilgiri North Forest Division and Sathyamangalam Tiger Reserve of Moyar Valley to determine the flock size in the three species of vultures and also to get a rough estimation of vultures. The results show higher flock size and higher densities in Nilgiri North Forest Division than in Sathyamangalam Tiger Reserve and the most numerous of these was the White-rumped Vulture. There is also evidence of seasonal movements in Nilgiri North Forest Division. These data represent the first systematic survey results from the area and demonstrate the significance of the Moyar Valley for all four Endangered vulture species, probably the main stronghold remaining in southern India. They are White-rumped Vulture Gyps bengalensis, Indian Vulture Gyps indicus, Red-headed Vulture Sarcogyps calvus and Egyptian Vulture Neophron percnopterus. The study recommends that immediate long-term conservation efforts should be taken to save the Critically Endangered vultures in the Moyar Valley.
    Attribution
    Venkitachalam R., Senthilnathan S. (2016). Journal of Threatened Taxa 1(8) pp. 8358-8364; doi:10.11609/jott.2522.8.1.8358-8364
  • Title
    The seasonality of butterflies in a semi-evergreen forest: Gibbon Wildlife Sanctuary, Assam, northeastern India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    A study spanning 3.7 years on the butterflies of Gibbon Wildlife Sanctuary GWS (21km2), a semi-evergreen forest, in Jorhat District of Assam, northeastern India revealed 211 species of butterflies belonging to 115 genera including 19 papilionids and seven ‘rare’ and ‘very rare’ species as per Evans list of the Indian sub-continent (Great Blue Mime Papilio paradoxa telearchus; Brown Forest BobScobura woolletti; Snowy Angle Darpa pteria dealbatahas; Constable Dichorragia nesimachus; Grey Baron Euthalia anosia anosia; Sylhet Oakblue Arhopala silhetensis; Branded Yamfly Yasoda tripunctata). The butterflies showed a strong seasonality pattern in this forest with only one significant peak during the post monsoon (September-October) when 118 species were in flight inside the forest which slowly declined to 92 species in November-December. Another peak (102 species) was visible after winter from March to April. Species composition showed least similarity between pre-monsoon (March-May) and post-monsoon (October-November) seasons. The number of papilionid species were greater from July to December as compared from January to June. The findings of this study suggest that the pattern of seasonality in a semi-evergreen forest in northeastern India is distinct from that of the sub-tropical lowland forest in the Himalaya. Favourable logistics and rich diversity in GWS points to its rich potential in promoting ‘butterfly inclusive ecotourism’ in this remnant forest.
    Attribution
    Singh Arun P., Gogoi Lina, Sebastain Jis (2015). Journal of Threatened Taxa 1(7) pp. 6774-6787; doi:10.11609/jott.1786.6774-6787
  • Title
    On the molluscan fauna of Lakshadweep included in various schedules of Wildlife (Protection) Act of India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Out of the 24 species of marine molluscs included in Schedule I and IV of the Wildlife (Protection) Act (WPA) of India, 19 species were recorded from the coastal waters of Lakshadweep.  A recent survey conducted by the authors recorded the presence of 14 scheduled molluscs in Lakshadweep.  Scheduled species such as Placuna placenta (recorded from Kavaratti) and Tudicla spirillus (recorded from Kalpeni) are new records from Lakshadweep.  The paper provides details for taxonomic identification of scheduled molluscs and discusses strategies for conservation of scheduled molluscs of Lakshadweep. 
    Attribution
    Bijukumar A., Ravinesh R., Arathi A. R., Idreesbabu K. K. (2015). Journal of Threatened Taxa 6(7) pp. 7253-7268; doi:10.11609/jott.2022.7253-7268
  • Title
    Notes on Pemphis acidula J.R. Forst. & G. Forst. (Myrtales: Lythraceae) from Andaman Islands, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Pemphis acidula Forst. (Lythraceae) has been reported herein with locality data after a lapse of 91 years from Andaman Islands. This re-discovery is significant as P. acidula has not been added to the mangrove flora of India in many important national and international status reports. This species is characterized by its narrowly elliptic to lanceolate leaves that are densely covered with silky hairs on both surfaces, crumpled white petals, capsule with circumscissile dehiscence and winged seeds. Further, new morphological discoveries viz., tetramerous and pentamerous flowers were reported in the present study in contrast to the perfect hexamerous flowers reported elsewhere. Since P. acidula is sparsely distributed, location-specific conservation strategies should be adapted in order to prevent its local extinction from the Islands. In addition, exploratory surveys are imperative particularly in calcareous rocky habitats for authenticating the wider distribution of such rare species. 
    Attribution
    Goutham-Bharathi M.P., Immanuel Titus, Kaliyamoorthy M., Gogoi Nitul Kumar, Sankar R. Kiruba, Roy S. Dam (2015). Journal of Threatened Taxa 8(7) pp. 7471-7474; doi:10.11609/jott.2115.7471-7474