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4 documents found tagged conservation planning [X]
  • Title
    Butterflies of Garhwal, Uttarakhand, western Himalaya, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Thirty percent of butterfly species that occur in India are found in the Garhwal region of the western Himalaya, which comprise six districts of Uttarakhand State with five major vegetation types lying between the catchments of the Ganga and Yamuna rivers.  The annotated checklist compiled here for this region comprises 407 species and takes into account all the species recorded since 1899, when the first list of 323 species was prepared by Mackinnon & de Nicéville on the ‘butterflies of Mussoorie and its adjacent areas’.  Over a 20 year period (1986–1990; 2000–June 2015) the present authors maintained detailed notes and were able personally to record 349 species.  This information is presented in a checklist, together with details of the month, year and site of each record, relative abundance, Indian Wildlife (Protection) Act, 1972 (IWPA) status, as well as references of earlier records made by other authors in Garhwal for those species that the authors were not able to record themselves.  Forty-nine species recorded in the region have been placed under various schedules of IWPA; only one species, the Golden Emperor Dilipa morgiana Westwood, is listed in Schedule I Part IV, the others being mainly included under Schedule II Part II.  The paper also discusses new range extensions and significant records (past and present), identifies major biotic factors that threaten butterfly diversity in Garhwal, and suggests the scope for butterfly ecotourism in the state as an option for long term conservation.  
    Attribution
    Singh Arun P.; Journal of Threatened Taxa Vol 8, No 4 (2016) 26/4/2016; pp. 8666-8697; 10.11609/jott.2254.8.4.8666-8697
  • Title
    Butterflies of the Garo Hills of Meghalaya, northeastern India: their diversity and conservation
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    The Garo Hills of Meghalaya, northeastern India, form the westernmost boundary of the globally recognized Indo-Myanmar Biodiversity Hotspot. The butterfly fauna of the Garo Hills is expected to be diverse, but it has not been properly sampled before. We surveyed butterflies in Balpakram National Park, Baghmara Reserve Forest and Siju Wildlife Sanctuary in southern Garo Hills, and Nokrek National Park in Western Garo Hills during four visits amounting to 49 days spread over two seasons, pre-monsoon (April-May) and post-monsoon (November-December), between 2008 and 2010. Here we report 298 butterfly species for the Garo Hills, eight of which are legally protected under Schedule I and 33 under Schedule II of the Indian Wildlife (Protection) Act, 1972. Our species accumulation curve suggests that many species remain to be discovered in the Garo Hills, and we expect the total species richness to be closer to 600-650 species. Little quantitative information exists on populations and seasonal occurrence of butterflies in India. Therefore, we recorded the number of individuals of each species in one or three hour counts during our surveys, and here we report season-wise relative abundances of 298 species from 3,736 individuals. We also report significant range extensions of two Schedule I species: Elymnias peali and Prothoe franck regalis, from the Garo Hills. These findings underscore the significance of the Garo Hills for butterfly conservation in India, and our work forms a baseline for future quantitative work on the diversity and conservation of butterflies in this biodiversity hotspot.
    Attribution
    Kunte K., Sondhi S., Sangma B.M., Lovalekar R., Tokekar K., Agavekar G. (2012). Journal of Threatened Taxa 10(4) pp. 2933-2992; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o2945.2933-92
  • Title
    Processes involved in assessing priorities for local level Lepidoptera conservation programmes that aim to achieve global conservation impact
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Identifying viable conservation projects for Lepidoptera that target threatened species depends upon effective identification and execution within a framework of events. This process requires information gathering and analysis, stakeholder discussion and local community involvement, planning, action, monitoring and review. Published working examples from four continents are drawn upon to illustrate all the key stages, focusing on methods for identifying priority areas (complementarity, biodiversity hotspots, habitat distribution, irreplaceability) for conserving threatened Lepidoptera, whilst considering other conservation issues.
    Attribution
    Kendrick R.C. (2011). Journal of Threatened Taxa 1(3) pp. 1456-1461; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o2579.1456-61
  • Title
    Butterflies - The Flying Jewels of the Western Ghats
    Type
    Report
    Description
    BUTTERFLIES