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3 documents found tagged deepor beel [X]
  • Title
    Deepor Beel revisited: new records of rotifers (Rotifera: Eurotatoria) with remarks on interesting species
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Plankton samples collected (April 2009 - March 2010) from Deepor Beel, a Ramsar site, revealed 21 species of the Phylum Rotifera belonging to 12 genera and eight families as new records. Amongst these, Brachionus durgae is a new record for northeastern India. The recorded species included the Australasian Brachionus dichotomus reductus and Notommata spinata; two Oriental endemics, namely, Keratella edmondsoni and Lecane blachei while Lecane lateralis, L haliclysta, Lepadella benjamini, Platyias leloupi, Mytilina acanthophora, Macrochaetus longipes, Trichocerca bicristata and T. flagellata are examples of regional distribution interest. The present report increases the number of species recorded from this important wetland of northeastern India to 134 species which, in turn, is the richest rotifer diversity known till date from any aquatic ecosystem of South Asia.
    Attribution
    Sharma B.K., Sharma S. (2011). Journal of Threatened Taxa 1(3) pp. 1437-1444; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o2482.1437-44
  • Title
    Rotifer communities of Deepor Beel, Assam, India: richness, abundance and ecology
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Plankton samples collected from two sampling stations of Deepor Beel (a Ramsar site in Assam, northeastern India) between November 2002 and October 2003, reveal 110 and 100 species of Rotifera, exhibit monthly richness ranging between 43-65 (56 plus or minus 6) and 38-60 (52 plus or minus 7) species and record 48.9-88.1 and 53.1-89.7% community similarities respectively. Rotifera (231 plus or minus 60 and 198 plus or minus 70 n/l) comprise between 48.7 plus or minus 6.1 and 42.6 plus or minus 4.1% of zooplankton abundance at station I and II respectively, and follow trimodal annual patterns with peaks during winter. Brachionidae (90 plus or minus 43, 79 plus or minus 39 n/l) > Lecanidae (45 plus or minus 13, 29 plus or minus 9 n/l) form important quantitative components of Rotifera while Asplanchnidae > Synchaetidae > Trochosphaeridae are other notable families. Lecane > Brachionus > Keratella > Asplanchna > Platyias contribute notably to temporal variations of the rotifers. Asplanchna priodonta, Keratella cochlearis, Platyias quadricornis, Lecane leontina, Polyarthra vulgaris, Keratella tropica and Brachionus falcatus are important species. Analysis of variance comparisons indicate significant temporal variations in richness and abundance of Rotifera between stations and months. The rotifer communities exhibit higher species diversity, higher evenness, lower dominance and lack of quantitative dominance of any individual species. The present results show no definite periodicity of richness and abundance of this group, families or species. Individual abiotic factors register limited influence on richness and abundance while multiple regression exhibits higher cumulative influence of ten abiotic factors on these parameters at both sampling stations.
    Attribution
    Sharma B.K. (2010). Journal of Threatened Taxa 8(2) pp. 1077-1086; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o2411.1077-86
  • Title
    Microcrustacea (Crustacea: Branchiopoda) of Deepor Beel, Assam, India: richness, abundance and ecology
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Plankton samples collected from two sampling stations of Deepor Beel, an important floodplain lake of Assam and a Ramsar site of India, revealed 51 species of Microcrustacea and showed qualitative dominance of Cladocera (45 species). Microcrustacea comprised a significant quantitative component (45.6 � plus or minus 5.8 and 50.8 � plus or minus 4.5 %) of zooplankton and exhibited bimodal and trimodal annual patterns with peaks during winter. Cladocera > Copepoda are important quantitative groups. ANOVA registered significant variation in species richness and abundance of Microcrustacea over time and between stations. Richness and abundance were inversely correlated with water temperature and rainfall, and positively correlated with specific conductivity and dissolved oxygen. Multiple regression registered significantly higher cumulative effects of ten abiotic factors on these two parameters. Our results are characterized by higher species diversity, higher evenness and lower dominance of Microcrustacea and show lack of distinct quantitative importance of individual species.
    Attribution
    Sharma B.K., Sharma S. (2009). Journal of Threatened Taxa 8(1) pp. 411-418; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o2169.411-8