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6 documents found tagged density [X]
  • Title
    New locality records of the ‘Dancing Girl’ of Mizoram, a rare zinger species
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Mantisia spathulata (Roxb.) Schult. belonging to the family Zingiberaceae is a rare ornamental Zingiber distributed from eastern Himalaya to Myanmar. In India, this species is confined to very few localities of northeastern India. A new location for the species was discovered at Kolasib, Mizoram. The species was recorded growing at an altitude of 662m. A thorough ecological sampling was done for the population. Density of flowering individuals and non-flowering young individuals were estimated. The species has never been recorded at this altitude previously and, as per record, no ecological work has been done earlier. The average density of Mantisia spathulata within its growing patch is 18(±2) individuals per m2. A total of 120 juvenile individuals (without flowers) were recorded from a 1×1 m2 plot; indicating a very good regeneration of the species within the patch where it is growing.
    Attribution
    Aparajita De & Demsai Reang, Journal of Threatened Taxa, Vol 8, No 5 (2016); pp. 8841–8843 http://dx.doi.org/10.11609/jott.2051.8.5.8841-8843
  • Title
    Avian diversity and density estimation of birds of the Indian Institute of Forest Management Campus, Bhopal, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    A study to find out the bird diversity at the Indian Institute of Forest Management (IIFM), Bhopal, was carried out over a period of nine months from July 2012 to March 2013. IIFM is located on a hill facing Bhadbhada barrage in Bhopal. Physiographically the area is classified as Vindhayan Hills. A total of 106 bird species belonging to 52 families were recorded during the study covering an area of about 93 hectares. The study area was divided into three major habitat types: open scrub, dry deciduous, and urbanized. Bird species were classified into eight feeding guilds: carnivore, ground insectivore, sallying insectivore, canopy and bark insectivore, nectar insectivore, general insectivore, frugivore and water birds. Of the total 106 species observed, 27 species were recorded as winter visitors. Density analysis was done using DISTANCE software and density was found out to be 32.7 birds per hectare. Rank abundance curve was used for assessing species composition in different habitats and during different seasons. In terms of both richness and evenness, open scrub scored the highest rank (72 species, and most even distribution of species). Higher species richness with lower species evenness was recorded during winter season for all the habitats.
    Attribution
    Aggarwal Anjali, Tiwari Govind, Harsh Sprih (2015). Journal of Threatened Taxa 2(7) pp. 6891-6902; doi:10.11609/jott.1850.6891-6902
  • Title
    Status of Golden Jackal Canis aureus and ungulates in a small enclosed area- Van Vihar National Park, Madhya Pradesh, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    We estimated densities of Golden Jackals and five ungulate species in Van Vihar National Park, Madhya Pradesh, India.  It is an enclosed area of about 4.45km², out of which 3.5km² is available for free ranging animals.  Twenty-six transects with a combined length of 22.6km and an effort of 50.2km were walked.  A total of 1079 animal detections belonging to six different species were made.  The density of jackals was (17±3.8SE)/km2. Among the ungulates, chital had the highest density (118±18.8SE)/km2 followed by Sambar (34.1±6.9 SE)/km2, Nilgai (13.1±2.8SE)/km2, Blackbuck (6.6±1.5 SE)/km2 and Wild Pig (3.7±0.8 SE)/km2.  The ungulate biomass was found to be (12979.2±2463.26 SE)kg/km2.  Chital biomass was the highest at (5574.2±886.58 SE)kg/km2, followed by Sambar biomass of (4569.4±913.75 SE)kg/km2, Nilgai (2358±523.24 SE)kg/km2, Blackbuck (211.2±66.18 SE)kg/km2 and Wild Pig (118.4±28.37 SE)kg/km2.  The sex ratio was calculated and most ungulates had female-biased adult sex ratio. 
    Attribution
    Prerna S., Edgaonkar Advait, Dubey Yogesh (2015). Journal of Threatened Taxa 8(7) pp. 7416-7421; doi:10.11609/jott.2107.7416-7421
  • Title
    Grey Junglefowl Gallus Sonneratii (Galliformes: Phasianidae) in Kalakad-Mundanthurai Tiger Reserve, Tamil Nadu, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    An abundance (density indices and encounter rates) of Grey Junglefowl (Gallus sonneratii) was estimated in Kalakad-Mundanthurai Tiger Reserve, Tamil Nadu from September 2007 to November 2007. Eleven line transects in different habitats were walked by two observers to estimate the relative density of the Grey Junglefowl. Ninety-seven individuals were sighted along the transect and the encounter rate was 1.07/km.
    Attribution
    Selvan K. Muthamizh, Sridharan N (2012). Journal of Threatened Taxa 1(4) pp. 2328-2329; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o2538.2328-9
  • Title
    Population density and group size of the Grey Junglefowl Gallus sonneratii in the Melghat Tiger Reserve, Maharashtra, central India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    A detailed survey was conducted from October 2010 to March 2011, to estimate the population density and group size of the Grey Junglefowl Gallus sonneratti in the Melghat Tiger Reserve. The survey was conducted in three forest ranges: Dhargad, Dhakna and Chikhaldara which come under the Gugamal Forest Division in the Melghat Tiger Reserve, Maharashtra. Population density was estimated by the line transect method using distance sampling. A total of 34 transects were walked in the study area each having 5 temporal replicates, which yielded 36 sightings, comprising 114 individuals of Grey jungle fowl in the entire period of study. An overall density of Grey Junglefowl was found to be 16.72 plus or minus 4.70 Birds/km2 (n= 36), whereas the average cluster size was 2.95 Birds (n= 36), average group density 5.68 plus or minus 1.49 (n= 36). This study was the first of its kind on the Grey Junglefowl in the Melghat Tiger Reserve. The results are intended to provide baseline data for the conduct of further studies on this important species in the region.
    Attribution
    Narasimmarajan K., Barman B.B., Puia L. (2012). Journal of Threatened Taxa 7(4) pp. 2723-2726; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o2821.2723-6
  • Title
    Seasonal variation of Hemiptera community of a temple pond of Cachar District, Assam, northeastern India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    The study records seven families, 11 genera and 14 species of hemipteran insect community in different seasons in a temple pond near Silchar, Cachar District, Assam, northeastern India. The pond is very rich in macrophytes like Nelumbo nucifera (Water Lotus), Hygrorhiza aristata (Indian Lotus), Cynodon dactylon (Bermuda Grass), Philotria sp. etc. The hemipteran families recorded in the system were Corixidae, Gerridae, Aphididae, Mesoveliidae, Notonectidae, Nepidae and Belostomatidae. The species were Micronecta haliploides, Micronecta (Basileonecta) scutellaris scutellaris (Stål) (Corixidae); Neogerris parvula (Stål), Limnogonus nitidus (Mayr), Tenagogerris sp., Rhagadotarsus sp. (Gerridae); Enithares ciliata (Fabricius), Anisops lundbladiana Landsbury, (Notonectidae); Diplonychus rusticus (Fabricius) and Diplonychus annulatus (Fabricius) (Belostomatidae), Rhopalosiphum nymphaeae (Linnaeus) (Aphididae), Ranatra elongata (Fabricius), Ranatra varipes varipes (Stål) (Nepidae) and Mesovelia vittigera Horváth (Mesoveliidae). The highest population of Hemiptera was recorded during the post-monsoon followed by the pre-monsoon and the monsoon periods. The lowest was recorded in the winter. Shannon Weiner diversity index (H/) and evenness index (J/) showed the highest diversity and evenness during the post monsoon period. Berger Parker index of dominance (d) was found highest in winter. In winter both diversity and density were the lowest. The study revealed the presence of four dominant species and three sub-dominant species in the pond. Insect diversity did not show any significant relationship with the environmental variables.
    Attribution
    Das K., Gupta S. (2012). Journal of Threatened Taxa 11(4) pp. 3050-3058; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o2724.3050-8