Listen to the second podcast episode with leading moth observation contributor Rachit Singh, as a part of our interview series leading up to the National Moth Week on July 22

Featured Document

Browse Documents

7 documents found tagged diet [X]
  • Title
    The seasonal occurrence of the Whale Shark Rhincodon typus (Smith, 1828) (Orectolobiformes: Rhincodontidae) along the Odisha coast, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    This article gives a description about the seasonal occurrence of Whale Shark in the southern Odisha coast by taking into account of the current observed data and published literatures. The present report claims the sighting of whale sharks during offshore surveys on 13th March 2016 and 15th March 2016, 8 km (19° 15’ 38” N, 85° 01’32” E) and 4.5 km (19º 15’ 69” N, 85° 00’ 58” E) off the coast of Gopalpur Port, Odisha respectively. Most of the earlier reports of whale shark sightings along Odisha coast are from the coastal waters off Rushikulya river mouth or Gopalpur during the month of February-March. Continuous records of whale sharks along southern Odisha coast during February and March suggest the probability of seasonal migration of this giant fish during the period.
    Attribution
    Shesdev Patro, Biraja Kumar Sahu, Chandanlal Parida, Madhusmita Dash & K.C. Sahu, Journal of Threatened Taxa, Vol 9, No 4 (2017); pp. 10125–10129 http://doi.org/10.11609/jott.3165.9.4.10125-10129
  • Title
    Diet composition of Golden Jackals Canis aureus (Mammalia: Carnivora: Canidae) in Van Vihar National Park, India, a small enclosed area.
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Food habits of Golden Jackals were estimated by an analysis of 200 scats in Van Vihar National Park, India, a small park of 4.45km2 with a very high density of jackals and ungulates.  A total of 10 items including fruits (40.74%), vegetative matter (24.38%), Chital (21.61%), Nilgai (9.57%), rodent (1.54%), birds (1.23%), Sambar (0.62%) and Wild Pig (0.31%) were consumed.  We estimated relative biomass consumption for the top potential ungulate prey and found that for every 100kg of potential prey killed by jackals, 89.4kg came from Chital and 10.6kg came from Nilgai calves.  The impact that predation can have on the ungulate population in an enclosed area is discussed. 
    Attribution
    Prerna S., Edgaonkar Advait, Dubey Yogesh (2015). Journal of Threatened Taxa 8(7) pp. 7422-7427; doi:10.11609/jott.2109.7422-7427
  • Title
    The diet of the Indian Flying Fox Pteropus giganteus (Brünnich. 1782) (Chiroptera: Pteropodidae) in Myanmar - conflicts with local people?
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    The diet of Pteropus giganteus from three roosts in Mandalay Region, central Myanmar was investigated for over two years by examining feeding remains in and around two villages.  It consists of 24 species of fruits, six species of flowers and three of leaves.  Of these, 13 species of fruits are eaten by the local people, three of which are also marketed.  Two are used in traditional medicine and one for stuffing pillows. Most dietary plants are native, mangoes are seasonally superabundant and are eaten in large numbers.  Interviews revealed no evidence of conflict between bats and villagers. 
    Attribution
    Win Sein Sein, Mya Khin Mya (2015). Journal of Threatened Taxa 9(7) pp. 7568-7572; doi:10.11609/jott.2182.7568-7572
  • Title
    Distribution, den characteristics and diet of the Indian Fox Vulpes bengalensis (Mammalia: Canidae) in Karnataka, India: preliminary observations
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    The Indian Fox Vulpes bengalensis inhabits relatively dry areas with scrub thorn forests, deciduous forests, short grasslands and marginal croplands. Since it is a widely distributed species, especially in the dry tracts, very little attention has been paid to it by researchers and wildlife managers. We conducted an extensive survey in the south Indian state of Karnataka to determine the conservation status of the Indian Fox. We also carried out a more detailed observation in a small region called “Jayamangali Blackbuck Block” (JBB) and surrounding private lands to study the den site characteristics of the species. Except for a few districts in the Western Ghats and the west coastal region, the fox was present throughout Karnataka. Relatively higher encounter rates were observed in regions with extensive grasslands. We located 52 dens during the study in JBB which provide a minimum of 12dens/km2 with 1.33/km2 active dens. Circumference of den sites were smaller in JBB than in the adjoining private lands indicating that foxes frequently shifted dens in this area. The number of openings and active openings increased as the circumference of the den site increased. Fecal analysis revealed remains of certain species of plants, vertebrates and invertebrates, with arthropods as the major food items of the fox.
    Attribution
    Kumara H.N., Singh M. (2012). Journal of Threatened Taxa 14(4) pp. 3349-3354; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o3046.3349-54
  • Title
    Some aspects of the ecology of the Indian Giant Squirrel Ratufa indica (Erxleben, 1777) in the tropical forests of Mudumalai Wildlife Sanctuary, southern India and their conservation implications
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    The Indian Giant Squirrel Ratufa indica, an endemic species to India, is widely distributed from the evergreen to moist and dry deciduous forests of Western and Eastern Ghats and the central Indian hills. We studied its population distribution, activity, feeding, ranging and nesting behaviour across three major habitats in the tropical forests of Mudumalai Wildlife Sanctuary, southern India, during 1998-2000 to manage the species effectively. Extensive survey of the three major habitats—tropical moist, dry deciduous and dry thorn—in the sanctuary shows that its distribution is continuous in moist and dry deciduous forests with good canopy contiguity and patchy along riverine areas in dry thorn and dry deciduous forests with sparse trees and broken canopy. Density estimates using 55 direct sightings from 199 km line transects show a mean of 2.9 (plus or minus 0.313) squirrels/km2. Daylight activity and feeding patterns assessed through 24,098 minutes of focal sampling reveal that animals feed and rest equal amounts of time. The diet constitutes seeds, bark, petioles, leaves and fruits from 25 plants, with Tectona grandis as the principal food source (41%). Its home range size varied from 0.8-1.7 ha with a mean of 1.3ha. Nesting characteristics assessed through 83 nests surveyed along 54km transects showed that the squirrel uses 15 of the 33 tree species found, with higher preference to Schleichera oleosa and Mangifera indica. Nest trees are significantly larger in height, gbh and canopy contiguity than nearest non-nest trees, which are attributed to better protection and escape from predators. Maintenance of diverse natural habitats and reduction in anthropogenic pressure are measures suggested for the conservation of giant squirrel populations in the study area.
    Attribution
    Baskaran N., Venkatesan S., Mani J., Srivastava S.K., Desai A.A. (2011). Journal of Threatened Taxa 7(3) pp. 1899-1908; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o2593.1899-908
  • Title
    First record of Lesser Yellow House Bat Scotophilus kuhlii Leach, 1821 from Secunderabad, Andhra Pradesh, India with a note on its diet
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    We report the specimen based record of Lesser Yellow House Bat Scotophilus kuhlii from Secunderabad, Andhra Pradesh, India. The morphometric, cranio-dental, bacular morphology and diet composition is presented.
    Attribution
    Srinivasulu B., Srinivasulu C., Venkateshwarlu P. (2010). Journal of Threatened Taxa 10(2) pp. 1234-1236; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o1989.1234-6
  • Title
    Diet of three insectivorous birds in Nagapattinam District, Tamil Nadu, India - a preliminary study
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    The dietary composition of the White-breasted Kingfisher Halcyon smyrnensis, the Small Bee-eater Merops orientalis and the Black Drongo Dicrurus macrocercus was studied between 2005 and 2006 in Nagapattinam District, Tamil Nadu, India by analyzing regurgitated pellets. The analysis revealed that the White-breasted Kingfisher preys mainly on arthropods (83.40%) and less on vertebrates; seven orders of insects were identified, with Coleoptera, Hemiptera, Hymenoptera and Orthoptera predominant. The small bee-eater diet is composed of Coleoptera (22.3%), Hymenoptera (20.8%), Hemiptera (14.1%), Orthoptera (12.6%), Odonata (10.7%), Lepidoptera (10.4%) and Diptera (8.6%). Beetles were also found to be the most frequent prey (23.7%) in the diet of black drongos, followed by Hemiptera (21.6%), Orthoptera (19.3%), Hymenoptera (14.4%), Lepidoptera (7.5%), Diptera (6.8%) and Odonata (6.0%).
    Attribution
    Asokan S., Ali A.M.S., Manikannan R. (2009). Journal of Threatened Taxa 6(1) pp. 327-330; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o2145.327-30