Leading up to the National Moth Week on July 22, we interview some contributors of moth observations.Listen to the first podcast episode with Nagesh O. S. on the IBP blog.

Featured Document

Browse Documents

28 documents found tagged diversity [X]
  • Title
    Diversity and seasonality of polypore fungi in the moist deciduous forests of Peechi-Vazhani Wildlife Sanctuary, Kerala, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    The objective of present study was to understand the diversity, distribution and seasonality of polypore fungi in the moist deciduous forests of Peechi-Vazhani Wildlife Sanctuary in three different seasons. Results obtained showed that density and frequency of occurrence have been varied significantly during different seasons and the community structure and species composition during monsoon and post monsoon seasons were distinct from pre-monsoon season. Fomitopsis feei with higher abundance values dominated the moist deciduous forests during monsoon season (17.72) and post-monsoon season (13.79). During pre-monsoon season, Daedalea flavida was the dominant species with abundance value of 10.93. The above fungi were predominant during all the seasons due to their high ecological amplitude. Fungal diversity analysis showed that species richness was higher during monsoon season and revealed the influence of seasonal variation on fungal diversity. The high species similarity was observed between monsoon and post monsoon season compared to pre-monsoon and monsoon.
    Attribution
    A. Muhammed Iqbal, Kattany Vidyasagaran & P. Narayan Ganesh, Journal of Threatened Taxa, Vol 8, No 12 (2016); pp. 9434–9442 http://dx.doi.org/10.11609/jott.2567.8.12.9434-9442
  • Title
    Odonata (Insecta) diversity of southern Gujarat, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    The diversity of the Odonata (dragonflies and damselflies) was studied in seven districts of southern area of Gujarat State in India during 2014 to 2015. A total of 55 species belonging to two suborders and 37 genera under eight families were recorded. A total of 18 species of Zygoptera (damselflies) and 37 species of Anisoptera (dragonflies) were recorded. Dang and Navsari districts were surveyed intensively and a maximum of 47 and 35 species were recorded respectively, whereas the districts that were surveyed less intensively, i.e., Bharuch (26), Valsad (21), Surat (29), Narmada (25) and Tapi (27) had comparatively low species richness. Thirty-two species are being reported for the first time from southern Gujarat, raising the total list of odonates to 60. Fifteen species namely, Lestes elatus Hagen in Selys, 1862; Elattoneura nigerrima (Laidlaw, 1917); Dysphaea ethela Fraser, 1924; Paracercion malayanum (Selys, 1876); Pseudagrion spencei Fraser, 1922; Burmagomphus laidlawi- Fraser, 1924; Cyclogomphus ypsilon Selys, 1854; Microgomphus torquatus (Selys, 1854); Onychogomphus acinaces (Laidlaw, 1922); Hylaeothemis indica Fraser, 1946; Lathrecista asiatica (Fabricius, 1798); Rhodothemis rufa (Rambur, 1842); Tramea limbata (Desjardins, 1832); Trithemis kirbyi Selys, 1891 and Zyxomma petiolatum Rambur, 1842 are recorded for the first time from Gujarat State raising the number of odonates of Gujarat State to 80 species.
    Attribution
    Darshana M. Rathod, B.M. Parasharya & S.S. Talmale, Journal of Threatened Taxa, Vol 8, No 11 (2016); pp. 9339–9349 http://dx.doi.org/10.11609/jott.2609.8.11.9339-9349
  • Title
    Micro algal diversity in Swamithope saltpans, Kanyakumari District, Tamil Nadu
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    The micro algal diversity in relation to salinity changes in Swamithope saltpans, Kanyakumari district, Tamil Nadu was studied. Algal samples were collected during pre-monsoon of 2015 from creek (source water), three different ponds i.e. holding, evaporation and crystallizing besides recording of salinity. The study indicated that Bacillariophyta members were dominant in creek (source water), while Cyanophyta members were dominant in both holding and evaporation ponds. Dunaliella, a Chlorophyta was the single species occurred in the crystallizing ponds.
    Attribution
    V Uma Rani, U, Elaya Perumal, S. Palanivel Guru Nanak College
  • Title
    Species Diversity of Short Horned Grasshopper (Orthoptera - Acrididae) in Selected Grasslands of Solapur District, Maharashtra, India
    Type
    Miscellaneous
    Description
    In the class insects, grasshopper is one of the largest and diverse group. They are dominant above ground invertebrates in cultivated and in natural grasslands ecosystems and they are functionally important. For the first time survey and collection of short horned grasshopper (Orthoptera: Acrididae) was carried out from selected grasslands of Solapur district, Maharashtra, India. Short horned grasshopper species were surveyed in selected grasslands of Solapur district, Maharashtra, India. 7 species belonging to 7 different genera i.e. Acrida, Gastrimargus, Trilophidia, Catantops, Calaptenopsis, Chrotogonus and Atractomorpha and 4 different subfamilies Tryxalinae, Cedipodinae, Catantopinae and Pyrgomorphinae were recorded.
    Attribution
    Department of Zoology, Nowrosjee Wadia College of Arts and Science, University of Pune, Pune, Maharashtra
  • Title
    Egg parasitoids from the subfamily Scelioninae (Hymenoptera: Platygastridae) in irrigated rice ecosystems across varied elevational ranges in southern India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Platygastridae (Hymenoptera) is the most abundant family of parasitic Hymenoptera in rice ecosystems in southern India. Members belonging to the subfamily Scelioninae were assessed in rice ecosystems along three elevation ranges, a highland (737m), midland (54m) and lowland (1.5m) in northcentral Kerala (southern India) during the pre-flowering to the milky-grain stage of paddy. Malaise traps were employed as the standard specimen collection methodology with collections made for four weeks, using two malaise traps per field, from August 2008 to January 2009, serviced once a week. The study recorded a total of 198 individuals belonging to 38 species in 21 genera. The species diversity, richness, evenness as well as beta diversity were computed for the three sites along with ANOVA and it was concluded that, contrary to other studies on different taxa, elevation did not have any major effect on the overall diversity patterns in Platygastridae even though there was a difference in species assemblages.
    Attribution
    M. Shweta & K. Rajmohana, Journal of Threatened Taxa, Vol 8, No 6 (2016); pp. 8898–8904 http://dx.doi.org/10.11609/jott.2061.8.6.8898-8904
  • Title
    An assessment of bryozoan (Phylactolaemata) fauna of Kagzipura Lake, Aurangabad, Maharashtra, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Freshwater Bryozoa is one of the less explored or ignored animal groups from India.  Kagzipura Lake, a rainwater fed water body was surveyed for three years to understand the diversity and distribution of bryozoan fauna.  The present study depicts four Phylactolaemata bryozoans species as Rumarcanella vorstmani, Plumatella casmiana, Lophopodella carteri and Swarupella divina.  The manuscript provides brief descriptions of these species, photomicrographs of statoblasts using scanning electron microscopy and colony characteristics. 
    Attribution
    Swami Pavan S., Harkal Ananta D., Mokashe Satish S.; Journal of Threatened Taxa Vol 8, No 3 (2016) 26/3/2016; pp. 8611-8614; 10.11609/jott.1607.8.3.8611-8614
  • Title
    Diversity and distribution of Primula species in western Arunachal Pradesh, eastern Himalayan region, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    The paper highlights the diversity, distribution and population status of Primula species in western Arunachal Pradesh. The present study has established the rich diversity of Primula species in western Arunachal Pradesh with a record total of 25 species, out of which five species, viz., Primula ioessa W.W.Sm., Primula munroi Lindley, Primula obliqua W.W.Sm., Primula prolifera Wall. and Primula jigmediana Hook. f. & Thomson ex Watt, are new to Arunachal Pradesh.  More than 60% of the taxa of Primula of the state occurs in two districts of the western part of the state.  A maximum diversity (76%) of Primula species was recorded between 3500m and 4000m and a minimum (4%) was between 1500m and 2000m.  This study showed the poor population of some Primula species in the study area.  Among the four sampling sites the Panga-Teng-Tso is highly disturbed which is clearly reflected by very poor population density of P. hookeri (1.36 individuals m-2). Various natural and anthropogenic threats have led to the pressure on the habitat of Primula species. Considering the rich species diversity of Primula and their distributional affinities, western Arunachal Pradesh may be considered as a centre of diversity of Indo-Chinese Primula species and appropriate conservation strategies should be adopted for the conservation of this genus. 
    Attribution
    Bawri Amal, Gajurel Padma Raj, Paul Ashish, Khan Mohamed Latif (2015). Journal of Threatened Taxa 1(7) pp. 6788-6795; doi:10.11609/jott.1788.6788-6795
  • Title
    Macrofungi in the lateritic scrub jungles of southwestern India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    A pilot study on macrofungi in scrub jungles (with and without fire-impact) in lateritic region of southwestern coast of India was carried out.  Out of 11 species in 10 genera recovered, six and five species were confined to scrub jungle and fire-impacted scrub jungle, respectively.  An ectomycorrhizal Amanita sp. was the most frequent in scrub jungle associated with exotic (Acacia auriculiformis and A. mangium) and plantation (Anacardium occidentale) trees.  Based on traditional knowledge, it is a highly edible and nutritional delicacy in the coastal regions.  Astraeus odoratus was another common ectomycorrhizal fungus in native trees Hopea ponga, which was recovered from the fire-impacted scrub jungle and is possibly edible.  Edible termite mound mushroom Termitomyces striatus was also common in the fire-impacted scrub jungle.  Chlorophyllum molybdites was the most frequent mushroom in the fire-impacted scrub jungle.  
    Attribution
    Greeshma A. A., Sridhar K. R., Pavithra M. (2015). Journal of Threatened Taxa 11(7) pp. 7812-7820; doi:10.11609/jott.2326.7812-7820
  • Title
    An inventory of odonates of central Gujarat, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    An inventory of Odonata was carried out in six districts of central Gujarat from 2012 to 2014.  A total of 42 species belonging to 27 genera, under seven families and two suborders were recorded.  A total of 16 species of Zygoptera (damselflies) and 26 species of Anisoptera (dragonflies) were recorded.  Anand District was surveyed intensively and as a result a maximum of 35 species was recorded (Dragonfly 22 and Damselfly 13), whereas less intensively surveyed districts, i.e., Panchmahal (17) and Dahod (16) had comparatively low species richness.  Twenty-two species are being reported for the first time from central Gujarat, raising the total list of odonates to 48.  Six species reported in an earlier survey were not encountered during this study.  Seven species namely, Copera marginipes, Pseudagrion microcephalum, Anaciaeschna jaspidea, Anax immaculifrons, Epophthalmia vittata, Brachydiplax sobrina, Tramea basilaris burmeisteri are being recorded for the first time from Gujarat State.  Hence, now the checklist of the odonates of Gujarat is raised to 65 species.  
    Attribution
    Rohmare V. B., Rathod Darshana M., Dholu S. G., Parasharya B. M., Talmale S. S. (2015). Journal of Threatened Taxa 11(7) pp. 7805-7811; doi:10.11609/jott.2325.7805-7811
  • Title
    Habitat utilization by wetland birds of Munderikadavu, a proposed bird sanctuary in northern Kerala, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Munderikadavu is rich in avifaunal diversity. A total of 82 species of birds from 36 families belonging to 13 orders were recorded in the wetland including wetland dependant species. Lowland vegetation had the highest species richness (46 species) followed by upland (41 species), aerial (38 species), emergent vegetation (22 species) and paddy fields (21 species).  Open water had the lowest species richness. Upland vegetation had the highest species diversity (H′-3.19) followed by aerial (H′-2.52).  There was more species overlap between emergent and low land vegetations (Cm-0.7).  The threats in Munderikadavu wetland were dumping of waste and conversion of cultivation land into shrimp farming area. Thus land use changes need to be regulated in order to conserve the wetland and bird community.  
    Attribution
    Roshnath R., Shruthi V. (2015). Journal of Threatened Taxa 12(7) pp. 7870-7878; doi:10.11609/jott.2377.7870-7878
  • Title
    Diversity of butterflies (Lepidoptera: Papilionoidea and Hesperoidea) of Dachigam National Park, Jammu and Kashmir, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    This preliminary study documented the diversity of butterflies of Dachigam National Park from 2004 to 2007.The field investigation was confined mostly to lower areas of the National Park and 27 species of butterflies were recorded. Except Hesperiidae, all the families were mostly active from April to August. 18 species showed mud puddling behaviour. Junonia orithya (Linnaeus) (Blue Pansy) and Neptis sappho Pallas (Pallas’ Sailer) are reported for the first time from Kashmir Valley.
    Attribution
    Qureshi A.A., Bhagat R.C., Bhat D.M. (2014). Journal of Threatened Taxa 1(6) pp. 5389-5392; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o2886.5389-92
  • Title
    Mangrove sediment core analysis of foraminiferal assemblages - a study at two sites along the western coast of India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Mangroves are an unique habitat and are largely influenced by sea level changes and wave energy. Foraminifera (Protista) preserved in mangrove sediments provide an excellent proxy for deducing past conditions. One meter deep mangrove core samples at two sites on the western coast of India were collected. The foraminiferal assemblages at various depths showed significant changes in the abundance and diversity down the cores. A total of 59 species belonging to 32 genera, 24 families and five suborders were identified from the cores of these two sites. The cores showed an abundance of genus Rotalidium particularly the species Rotalidium annectans. Other species identified include Ammonia, Elphidium, Nonion, Spiroloculina, Quinqueloculina, Globigerinoides, etc. The pH, organic matter and CaCO3 also showed variations down the cores. There was a lack of correlation between sediment characteristics and the abundance of foraminifera in the cores. The low diversity and differences in distribution of foraminifera compared to surface intertidal samples may be due to intense post depositional changes or anthropogenic disturbances. The mangrove ecology thus appears disturbed by various factors.
    Attribution
    Vidya P., Patil R.K. (2014). Journal of Threatened Taxa 2(6) pp. 5485-5491; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o3653.5485-91