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3 documents found tagged dominance [X]
  • Title
    Avifaunal diversity in Assam University Campus, Silchar, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    We conducted a bird survey in the Assam University campus, Silchar from February 2011 to June 2011. A total of 73 species of birds belonging to 56 genera, 32 families and 13 orders was recorded. Significantly, the highest number of bird species restricted to only one particular habitat (17 species) was recorded in the forest area called ‘eco-forest’ (χ2=18, df=3, P<0.01). The highest similarity of bird species was found between degraded area and secondary growth area, and the lowest was found between eco-forest and degraded area. Species richness and dominance of species were more in the eco-forest area. The diversity of species was more in the secondary growth area. Red-vented Bulbul, Spotted Dove and Red-whiskered Bulbul were the most abundant and frequent bird species found in campus. The avifaunal diversity in the study area shows the importance of the University campus as an ideal bird habitat.
    Attribution
    Chakdar Biswajit, Choudhury Parthankar, Singha Hilloljyoti (2016). Journal of Threatened Taxa 1(8) pp. 8369-8378; doi:10.11609/jott.2524.8.1.8369-8378
  • Title
    Seasonal dynamics of butterfly population in DAE Campus, Kalpakkam, Tamil Nadu, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Seasonal population trends of butterflies inhabiting the campus of Department of Atomic Energy (DAE) at Kalpakkam were recorded by setting a permanent line transect of 300m and recording all species of butterflies observed within a 5m distance. The survey yielded 2177 individuals of 56 butterfly species, belonging to the families Nymphalidae, Pieridae, Lycaenidae, Papilionidae and Hesperiidae. Nymphalidae were found to be the dominant family during all seasons. Species richness and abundance were highest during the northeast monsoon and winter periods, indicating that in the southern plains of India butterflies prefer cool seasons for breeding and emergence. The taxonomic structure of the butterflies sampled resembles that of the Western Ghats and other regions of India in two ways: (a) dominance of nymphalids and (b) peak abundance during wet seasons. A detailed study of ecologically important local butterfly fauna and their host plants is in progress, to construct a butterfly garden in Kalpakkam to attract and support butterflies.
    Attribution
    Hussain K.J., Ramesh T., Satpathy K.K., Selvanayagam M. (2011). Journal of Threatened Taxa 1(3) pp. 1401-1414; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o2603.1401-14
  • Title
    Diversity of microcrustacea (Crustacea: Branchiopoda) of Loktak Lake, a Ramsar site, Manipur, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Microcrustacea of Loktak Lake (collected during Nov. 2002-Oct. 2004) reveal 57 species and show qualitative dominance of Cladocera (51 species). They indicate monthly richness ranging between 33�plus or minus 6 and 32� plus or minus 6 species, record 51.7-82.3 and 53.6-90.0% community similarities during two years respectively, and follow trimodal annual patterns with peaks during winter. The microcrustaceans (112� plus or minus 17 and 124� plus or minus 13 n/l) form an important quantitative component (45.7� plus or minus 4.9 and 43.3� plus or minus 3.7 %) of zooplankton and show broadly trimodal annual patterns with peak abundance during winter. Cladocera > Copepoda mainly contribute to their quantitative variations. ANOVA registers significant monthly variations of microcrustacea richness and significant annual and monthly variations of their abundance. Richness is positively correlated with dissolved oxygen and is negatively correlated with rainfall, hardness, chloride and total dissolved solids while abundance is negatively correlated with pH only. Multiple regressions indicate higher cumulative effect of 15 abiotic factors on richness and abundance. Our results indicate no definite periodicity of richness and abundance of microcrustacea or their constituent groups during two annual cycles and are characterized by their higher species diversity, higher evenness and lower dominance.
    Attribution
    Sharma B.K., Sharma S. (2009). Journal of Threatened Taxa 11(1) pp. 541-548; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o2231.541-8