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5 documents found tagged dragonfly [X]
  • Title
    An observation on the Odonata fauna of the Asansol-Durgapur Industrial Area, Burdwan, West Bengal, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    The present investigation was undertaken as a pilot study to examine the diversity, occurrence and distribution pattern of dragonflies and damselflies (Odonata) from the selected study sites of the Asansol-Durgapur industrial area of Burdwan District of West Bengal, India from January 2012 to December 2015.  A combination of direct search and opportunistic sighting methods were applied to record 57 different Odonata species (38 dragonflies and 19 damselflies).  Among the dragonflies the most diverse family was Libellulidae represented by 36 species while among damselflies Coenagrionidae was the most diverse family represented by 16 species.  In spite of the Asansol-Durgapur region being an industrial urban area, the present study revealed a handsome diversity of odonates.  A suitable geographic location, favourable climatic conditions, heterogeneous habitat types that included ponds, wetlands, riverbeds, grasslands and agricultural lands along with the presence of appropriate vegetation provided a comfortable shelter for Odonata species to flourish in this ecoregion.   All the odonates noted in the present study belong to the Least Concerned category as designated by IUCN. 
    Attribution
    Nayak Amar Kumar, Roy Utpal Singha (2016). Journal of Threatened Taxa 2(8) pp. 8503-8517; doi:10.11609/jott.2572.8.2.8503-8517
  • Title
    Observations on a gynochromatic (?) male of the dragonfly, Rhodothemis rufa (Rambur, 1842) (Odonata: Libellulidae)
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    The dragonfly Rhodothemis rufa exhibits a conspicuous sexual dimorphism in its body colour.  The mature male is characterized by the homogenous striking brilliant red body while the mature female is dull brown with a prominent mid-dorsal light yellow streak running from the top of the head through the thorax and down to the fifth segment of the abdomen.  The sexes can easily be identified from quite a long distance.  On 7 November 2012, we observed the unusual sight of a female Rhodothemis rufa chasing another female and forming a tandem link which was followed by copulation.  This peculiar reproductive behavior instigated us to net the specimen.  On inspection we  found that although it appeared a female, it had well developed external male genitalia in the form of the secondary copulatory apparatus on the venter of the second and third abdomen, a pair of coxites on the ninth abdominal tergum and an additional infra anal appendage at the terminal tip of the abdomen.  The testes contained a large number of lobules filled with mature spermatozoa, and the vasa differentia also contained mature sperms.  The sperm sac was filled with sperms embedded in seminal fluid.  Observations indicate that this could be a rare case of a gynochromatic male of Rhodothemis rufa which has retained the colour patterning of the female even after sexual maturity and concomitantly exhibiting active sexual behaviour, although the case of it being a subadult male which has yet to attain its typical red coloration cannot be ruled out.  
    Attribution
    Andrew Raymond J. (2015). Journal of Threatened Taxa 3(7) pp. 7007-7010; doi:10.11609/jott.1900.7007-7010
  • Title
    Andromorphic female of the dragonfly Neurothemis tullia tullia (Drury) (Odonata: Libellulidae), central India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Neurothemis tullia tullia (Drury) is a common dragonfly which occurs in large colonies in swamps and heavily- weeded tanks in different parts of India. It exhibits striking sexual dimorphism in colour and wing spot patterns. The male is dark with a large blue-black spot on the wing base while the female is dull olivaceous and the wing base is amber yellow. The sexes can be easily identified from quite a far distance. Andromorphic females are very rarely found in anisopteran dragonflies. This paper describes and compares not only the coloration and wing spots of the normal male and female with this andromorphic female but also reports about its sexual fitness to produce viable eggs.
    Attribution
    Andrew R.J. (2013). Journal of Threatened Taxa 1(5) pp. 3571-3573; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o3143.155
  • Title
    Key to the larval stages of common Odonata of Hindu Kush Himalaya, with short notes on habitats and ecology
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    The order Odonata is one of the most widely studied groups among insects from the oriental region. They colonize in both stagnant and running water bodies of wide water quality. Hitherto, the existing literature on the Odonata contained numerous publications with coloured figures of adults, helpful for identification. Identification key with figures on larval stages, using their coloration as distinguishing characters are largely missing. The current work attempts to provide an identification key to aquatic larvae of the most common families of Zygoptera, Anisoptera and Anisozygoptera with colour illustrations. The specimens were collected from Nepal and India (northern part). Each family is represented by several examples to demonstrate the range of morphological variability. This key helps determination of aquatic larvae Odonata up to family level without enormous efforts in field and laboratory.
    Attribution
    Nesemann H., Shah R.D.T., Shah D.N. (2011). Journal of Threatened Taxa 9(3) pp. 2045-2060; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o2759.2045-60
  • Title
    Odonata of Maharashtra, India with notes on species distribution
    Type
    Report
    Description
    Odonata are freshwater insects spread world-wide. Tropical areas are high Odonata diversity areas. However, there has not been accumulation of extensive baseline data on spatial distribution of these insects from such places. Maharashtra, the third largest state of India, harbors a variety of land-use and occupies six biogeographic provinces. We carried out Odonata surveys in Maharashtra during 2006–2014. Compilation of all these studies along with other authenticated records resulted in a checklist of 134 species of Odonata belonging to 70 genera representing 11 families. The highest numbers of species were recorded from the Libellulidae (48 species) and Gomphidae (22 species) families. A previous study had reported 99 species of Odonata from the Maharashtra state considering records from early 1900’s to 2012. Our observations across the state add 33 species to this list. Maharashtra forms a unique source of Odonata diversity and our observations support the importance of this region in providing valuable habitats for Odonata. Here, we discuss several of the new records, how global surveys might help fill the local gap in species distributions, how secondary data deposited through crowd-sourcing can help and what it offers to conservation.