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2 documents found tagged education [X]
  • Title
    Project hunt: an assessment of wildlife hunting practices by local community in Chizami, Nagaland, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Hunting is suggested as a major threat to Indian wildlife, especially in the northeastern states. In Nagaland hunting has a traditional and cultural significance, which should be taken into consideration by conservation efforts.  Limited information is available on this issue, and in order to establish a baseline for efforts aimed at education and implementation of conservation programmes, in this study we investigated various aspects of hunting practices in Chizami Village, Nagaland.  Our study involved general voting by 868 people and detailed interviews of 80 hunters, and explores the demography of hunters, hunting areas, hunting preference for season and animals, methods of hunting, reasons for hunting and willingness to cease hunting.  Our results indicate that education could be an important primer for initiating biological conservation efforts in Chizami and other areas. 
    Attribution
    Naro Erekhrou, Mero Erite L., Naro Ezekolhi, Kapfo Kekhrowu-u, Wezah Khrobeu, Thopi Khromeseu, Rhakho Kuweu, Akami Lhitshewe, Thopi Lhitshou, Chirhah Metshewe-u, Chirhah Tekhewulo, Tsuhah Tekhewu-u, Thopi Tshekulhi, Wezah Wekhrode, Mero Wetolo-u L., Thopi Wetshokhro, Thopi Kewekhrozo, Naro Tshetsholo, Tsuhah Wekoweu, Dahanukar Neelesh, Molur Payal B. (2015). Journal of Threatened Taxa 11(7) pp. 7729-7743; doi:10.11609/jott.2317.7729-7743
  • Title
    Captive elephants - an overview
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Currently a significant portion of the world’s elephant population is in captivity, mainly in Asia. Elephants have a long history of captivity in both Africa and Asia, and have adapted to many environments. Today, due to evolving needs and philosophies, some changes have occurred in the use of captive elephants, and debate about their welfare and management is increasing. To address this, several countries are developing higher standards of care via policies and guidelines; unfortunately most elephant range countries do not have a national strategy concerning their captive elephant population. Challenges in elephant medicine are always present, yet there is a lack of standardized requirements for veterinary care in elephant range countries, and the ability of veterinarians to treat elephant diseases is often limited. In recent years, much has been learned about elephant physiology, biology, and communication from captive elephants, and this knowledge supports management decisions affecting both captive and wild populations. Captive elephants present important educational and fundraising opportunities in support of conservation, but these are often not fully leveraged. Future considerations include implementing changes to improve staff support and training, establishing comprehensive registration of all captive populations, and ensuring that captive management does not negatively impact wild elephant populations.
    Attribution
    Riddle H.S., Stremme C. (2011). Journal of Threatened Taxa 6(3) pp. 1826-1836; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o2620.1826-36