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13 documents found tagged endemism [X]
  • Title
    A checklist of birds of Kerala, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    A checklist of birds of Kerala State is presented in this paper. Accepted English names, scientific binomen, prevalent vernacular names in Malayalam, IUCN conservation status, endemism, Wildlife (Protection) Act schedules, and the appendices in the CITES, pertaining to the birds of Kerala are also given. The State of Kerala has 500 species of birds, 17 of which are endemic to Western Ghats, and 24 species fall under the various threatened categories of IUCN.
    Attribution
    J Praveen (2015). Journal of Threatened Taxa 13(7) pp. 7983-8009; doi:10.11609/jott.2001.7.13.7983-8009
  • Title
    Small carnivores of Parambikulam Tiger Reserve, southern Western Ghats, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    The first ever detailed study on the small carnivores of the Parambikulam Tiger Reserve (PkTR) in the southern Western Ghats, using camera trap techniques, reported 11 species. A total of 1,350 camera-trap nights were used for the study. This was supplemented with 242km of day transects and 344km of night transects using spot-lights. The small carnivores reported were the Small Indian Civet Viverricula indica, Common Palm Civet Paradoxurus hermaphroditus, Brown Palm Civet Paradoxurus jerdoni, Indian Grey Mongoose Herpestes edwardsii, Stripe-necked Mongoose Herpestes vitticollis, Brown Mongoose Herpestes fuscus, Ruddy Mongoose Herpestes smithii, Smooth-coated Otter Lutrogale perspicillata, Nilgiri Marten Martes gwatkinsii, Jungle Cat Felis chaus and Leopard Cat Prionailurus bengalensis. About 90% of the small carnivores captured in the camera traps in PKTR were members of the Viverridae family such as the Small Indian Civet (31.67%), Common Palm Civet (30%) and Brown Palm Civet (28.33%). The study recorded all the four species of mongoose known from the Western Ghats from PkTR. Two out of the 11 small carnivores belong to the ‘Vulnerable’ category on the IUCN Red List.
    Attribution
    R. Sreehari & P.O. Nameer, Journal of Threatened Taxa, Vol 8, No 11 (2016); pp. 9306–9315 http://dx.doi.org/10.11609/jott.2311.8.11.9306-9315
  • Title
    A preliminary checklist of spiders (Araneae: Arachnida) in Chinnar Wildlife Sanctuary, Western Ghats, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    A preliminary study was conducted to document spider diversity in Chinnar Wildlife Sanctuary, Idukki District, Kerala State in southern India.  The study was conducted from October to November 2012.  A total of 101 species of spiders belonging to 65 genera from 29 families were identified from the sanctuary.  This accounted for 6.98% of Indian spider species, 17.81% of Indian spider genera and 48.33% of the spider families of India.  The dominant families were Lycosidae (11 species) and Araneidae (10).  Two endemic genera of Indian spiders such as Annandaliella and Neoheterophrictus were found at Chinnar, each representing one species each, and belonging to the family Theraphosidae.  A guild structure analysis of the spiders revealed seven feeding guilds such as orb weavers, stalkers, ground runners, foliage runners, sheet web builders, space web builders and ambushers. 
    Attribution
    Adarsh C. K., Nameer P. O.; Journal of Threatened Taxa Vol 8, No 4 (2016) 26/4/2016; pp. 8703-8713; 10.11609/jott.2740.8.4.8703-8713
  • Title
    A checklist of amphibians of Kerala, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    A checklist of amphibians of Kerala State is presented in this paper.  Accepted English names, scientific binomen,  vernacular names in Malayalam, IUCN conservation status, endemism, Indian Wildlife (Protection) Act schedules, and the appendices in the CITES, pertaining to the amphibians of Kerala are also given.  The State of Kerala has 151 species of amphibians, 136 of which are endemic to Western Ghats and 50 species fall under the various threatened categories of IUCN.  
    Attribution
    Das Sandeep (2015). Journal of Threatened Taxa 13(7) pp. 8023-8035; doi:10.11609/jott.2003.7.13.8023-8035
  • Title
    Spiders of Kerala Agricultural University Campus, Thrissur, Kerala, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    A total of 86 species of spiders belonging to 56 genera of 20 families have been recorded from the Kerala Agricultural University (KAU) campus, Thrissur, Kerala, southern India.  This represents 5.1% of the total spiders’ species and 33.33% of the total families of spiders recorded in India.  The dominant spider family at KAU campus is Araneidae with 18 species of nine genera. Salticidae is represented by 14 species of 13 genera.  Out of 252 endemic spiders of India, 16 have been reported from KAU campus.  Guild structure analysis shows spiders belonging to seven types of feeding guilds present in KAU campus.  Orb-web builders are the dominant feeding guild accounting for 34%, followed by stalkers (22%), ground runners (20%), ambushers (8%), scattered line weavers (8%), foliage runners (7%) and sheet-web builders (1%). 
    Attribution
    Adarsh C. K., Nameer P. O. (2015). Journal of Threatened Taxa 15(7) pp. 8288-8295; doi:10.11609/jott.2468.7.15.8288-8295
  • Title
    Birds of sacred groves of northern Kerala, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Sacred groves are patches of vegetation preserved due to  religious or cultural tradition.  They are protected through spiritual beliefs.  Sacred groves provide an excellent abode to the biodiversity of the region where they are located.   Scientific exploration of fauna from sacred groves of India is few and far between.  The present study was conducted to explore the bird diversity and abundance in 15 selected sacred groves of northern Kerala, eight from Kannur District and seven from Kasargod District each.  A total of 111 bird species were observed belonging to 49 families and 16 orders.  The sacred groves of northern Kerala support many of the ‘forest-birds’ such as the Grey Junglefowl Gallus sonneratii, Asian Fairy-bluebird Irena puella, Tickell’s Blue-flycatcher Cyornis tickelliae, Malabar Trogon Harpactes fasciatus, Heart-spotted Woodpecker Hemicircus canente, Malabar Whistling-Thrush Myophonus horsfieldii, Little Spiderhunter Arachnothera longirostra, etc.  The sacred groves of northern Kerala also support two endemic bird species of the Western Ghats, such as the Malabar Grey Hornbill Ocyceros griseus and Rufous Babbler Turdoides subrufa. Five species of raptors and four owl species were reported from the sacred groves of north Kerala during the present study.  The breeding of the White-bellied Sea-Eagle has been reported at Edayilakadu Kavu, a sacred grove in Kasargod District.  The sacred groves of northern Kerala also supported 17 species of long distant migratory birds.  Thazhe Kavu, recorded the Black-headed Ibis Threskiornis melanocephalus, a Near-Threatened bird according to IUCN. 
    Attribution
    Jyothi K. M., Nameer P. O. (2015). Journal of Threatened Taxa 15(7) pp. 8226-8236; doi:10.11609/jott.2463.7.15.8226-8236
  • Title
    Discovery of a new sub-population, mapping and updated Red List assessment of the Endangered Cycas beddomei Dyer (Cycadales: Cycadaceae)
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    A new sub-population of Cycas beddomei Dyer (Cycadaceae), hitherto believed to be endemic to the Seshachalam Hills (Tirupati-Kadapa Hills) of Andhra Pradesh is discovered from Velikonda Hills (Nellore-Kadapa districts) of Andhra Pradesh.  Hence its global distribution status is hereby revised endemic to Seshachalam and Velikonda hills  of Eastern Ghats of Andhra Pradesh.  Combined datasets of our earlier studies with the latest indicated no change in its ‘Endangered’ status.  
    Attribution
    Rao B. Ravi Prasad, Naik M. Chennakesavulu, Salamma S., Babu M. V. Suresh (2015). Journal of Threatened Taxa 12(7) pp. 7902-7909; doi:10.11609/jott.2379.7902-7909
  • Title
    Why the Red Giant Gliding Squirrel Petaurista petaurista is often mistaken for the Namdapha Gliding Squirrel Biswamoyopterus biswasi (Mammalia: Rodentia: Sciuridae) in Namdapha National Park, Arunachal Pradesh, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Through multiple interactions with forest personnels, researchers and tourists in Namdapha National Park (NGS), we understood that the Red Gaint Gliding Squirrel (RGGS) is often mistaken to Namdpaha Gliding Squirrel. So, we assessed and found six possible reasons for the mis-identification of the species. So, in-order to differentiate the species, we provide the differentiating characters between the NGS and RGGS using the available literature and by studying the available specimens at ZSI, Kolkata and at Namdapha National park museum, Miao, Arunachal Pradesh.
    Attribution
    Krishna C.M., Kumar A. (2014). Journal of Threatened Taxa 8(6) pp. 6138-6141; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o3727.6138-41
  • Title
    CEPF Western Ghats Special Series : Diversity and distribution of anurans in Phansad Wildlife Sanctuary (PWS), northern Western Ghats of India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    In global consequences of rapidly changing climate and increased amphibian population decline, mapping amphibian diversity in biodiversity hotspots is essential. In this study we have systematically studied anurans of Phansad Wildlife Sanctuary in terms of species diversity, population structure, threat status and distribution. We recorded a total of 22 anuran species, of which 11 species are endemic to Western Ghats biodiversity hotspot. Family Dicroglossidae was found to be more species-rich. Spatial and temporal variation in anuran diversity was observed by using Shannon diversity and evenness indices. Most of the endemic and threatened anuran species are found to be associated with evergreen undisturbed forest patches. Habitat parameters like humidity, forest type, canopy coverage, riparian canopy coverage, stream persistence and litter depth are found to be major variables governing species diversity and distribution. Major anthropogenic threats to amphibians of Phansad Wildlife Sanctuary are discussed along with future conservation objectives. With range extension of species like Fejervarya caperata and Minervarya sahyadris further north in the Western Ghats, taxonomic ambiguities recorded during study are discussed briefly.
    Attribution
    Katwate U., Apte D., Raut R. (2013). Journal of Threatened Taxa 2(5) pp. 3589-3602; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o3038.3589-602
  • Title
    CEPF Western Ghats Special Series: Mammals of the Meghamalai landscape, southern Western Ghats, India - a review
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Reports on the concurrence of mammals in the Meghamalai landscape were collated from published literature and also the data obtained from a recent study spanning over 18 months (June 2011-December 2012). Sixty-three species belonging to 24 families occur in the landscape, which include 24 globally threatened (one Critically Endangered; seven Endangered; 11 Vulnerable and five Near Threatened) species. Of the recorded species, four species are endemic to India and nine are endemic to the Western Ghats. The present study added five species, viz., Rusty-spotted Cat Prionailurus rubiginosus, Malabar Spiny Tree Mouse Platacanthomys lasiurus, Grizzled Giant Squirrel Ratufa macroura, Common Palm Civet Paradoxurus hermaphrodites and the Indian Grey Mongoose Herpestes edwardsii to the six decade old mammal list. But, 13 species reported by Hutton were not recorded during the study. Among them, occurrence of Malabar Civet Viverra civettina and Fishing Cat Prionailurus viverrinus in southern India remains unresolved. During our study, anthropogenic pressures such as conversion of natural habitats, encroachment, hunting, cattle grazing and tourism were observed to affect the distribution of mammals in the landscape.
    Attribution
    Babu S., Srinivas G., Kumara H.N., Tamilarasu K., Molur S. (2013). Journal of Threatened Taxa 15(5) pp. 4945-4952; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o3596.4945-52
  • Title
    CEPF Western Ghats Special Series: Meghamalai landscape : a biodiversity hotspot
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    The Meghamalai, also known as High Wavy Mountains, is located in the Theni Forest Division of Tamil Nadu, Western Ghats. The landscape is endowed with an array of vegetation types varying from dry (thorn forests) in the eastern side to wet (evergreen) forests on the western side due to wide elevation gradient (220-2000 m above sea level) and varied rainfall pattern (wind ward and leeward zones). The composition and configuration of this landscape facilitates diverse species of vertebrates (18 species of fishes, 35 amphibians, 90 reptiles, 254 birds, 63 mammals). In the past, selected floral and faunal groups of Meghamalai have been sporadically surveyed by the British explorers. However, in-depth ecological studies on various biota have only been initiated in recent years by SACON and WILD, which highlighted the conservation importance of the area. It is hoped that the recently declared Meghamalai Wildlife Sanctuary encompassing a part of the landscape, and the proposal of the Srivilliputtur-Meghamalai Tiger Reserve, if realized, would help conserving the diverse biota of this landscape in the long run.
    Attribution
    Bhupathy S., Babu S. (2013). Journal of Threatened Taxa 15(5) pp. 4939-4944; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o3592.4939-44
  • Title
    Recent sightings of two very rare butterflies, Lethe margaritae Elwes, 1882 and Neptis nycteus de Nicéville, 1890, from Sikkim, eastern Himalaya, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Lethe margaritae Elwes, 1882 and Neptis nycteus de Nicéville, 1890 are very rare butterflies that are endemic to the Himalaya, and are legally protected in India. However, they have not been recorded in India in nearly 100 years. Here we review the available published information on their type localities, distribution and other natural history, and then report two recent sightings from Sikkim, northeastern India. Our sightings constitute rediscoveries of the Indian populations of these species.
    Attribution
    Rai S., Bhutia K.D., Kunte K. (2012). Journal of Threatened Taxa 14(4) pp. 3319-3326; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o2965.3319-26