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4 documents found tagged faunal diversity [X]
  • Title
    Faunal diversity of Satara District, Maharashtra, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Satara District of Maharashtra State is a part of northern Western Ghats and Deccan Plateau biogeographic zones. The data on various faunal groups was collected from the extensive study carried out during the period between 2007 and 2010, covering different parts of the district. The present study reports faunal diversity of the district with 677 species under 150 families belonging to 11 different groups. Overall, the district has substantial faunal diversity. Out of the total species, 94 are recorded as endemic species, 35 species are listed as threatened under the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species, and 38 species are listed in the different schedules of Indian Wildlife (Protection) Act 1972 (as amended up to 2013). The information on geographical distribution pattern of mammalian species in the district is also provided.
    Attribution
    Amit Sayyed, Journal of Threatened Taxa, Vol 8, No 13 (2016); pp. 9537–9561 http://dx.doi.org/10.11609/jott.3162.8.13.9537-9561
  • Title
    An inventory of mammals, birds and reptiles along a section of the river and banks of upper Ganges, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    A study was conducted to assess faunal diversity along a 165-km stretch of the upper Ganges River between Bijnor and Narora cities, Uttar Pradesh, from January to June 2007. Both river and bank species diversity of reptiles, birds and mammals using a combination of boat surveys, linear walks and random searches were inventoried. Presence of 18 species of mammals, 55 species of birds and 13 species of reptiles were recorded from the river stretch including 16 species of global conservation significance. Maximum encounter rate was observed for little cormorant (3.160 plus or minus 0.290), macaque (2.385 plus or minus 0.442) and brown roofed turtle (1.009 plus or minus 0.107). Our study is an attempt towards generating baseline information on the faunal diversity of the upper Ganges and we recommend exhaustive surveys and regular monitoring of this river stretch through indicator species approach.
    Attribution
    Bashir T., Behera S.K., Khan A., Gautam P. (2012). Journal of Threatened Taxa 9(4) pp. 2900-2910; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o2692.2900-10
  • Title
    Prevalence of intestinal parasites among captive Asian Elephants Elephas maximus: effect of season, host demography, and management systems in Tamil Nadu, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Maintenance of wild animals in captivity is fraught with numerous challenges, including the control of disease. This study evaluates the effect of season, host demography (age-sex), and differing management systems on the prevalence of intestinal parasites among elephants managed in three captive systems: temple, private, and forest department, in Tamil Nadu. In addition, the study also assessed the availability of veterinary care for elephants in these systems. The parasitic prevalence was evaluated by direct microscopic identification of helminth eggs in faecal samples (n = 115) collected from different age/sex classes of elephants. Of the 115 elephants examined, 37% showed positive results, being infected only with Strongyles sp. The prevalence rate varied significantly across seasons, with the highest rate during summer (49%) followed by monsoon (41%) and the lowest rate during winter (15%). While males had a significantly lower parasite prevalence compared to females (29% vs. 40%), age classes showed no significant difference. Despite the fact that the proportion of animals receiving veterinary care was higher under the forest department system (100%) compared to the private system (26%), parasite prevalence was significantly higher under the former (48%) than the latter (31%) system. The difference in the proportion of animals with parasitic prevalence among the three systems could be due to differing management practices (i.e. in solitary versus groups) and the details are discussed.
    Attribution
    Vanitha V., Thiyagesan K., Baskaran N. (2011). Journal of Threatened Taxa 2(3) pp. 1535-1541; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o2488.1527-34
  • Title
    Testate amoebae (Protozoa: Rhizopoda) of Deepor Beel (a Ramsar site), Assam, northeastern India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Twenty-one species of Rhizopoda belonging to eight genera and six families were documented from Deepor Beel, an important floodplain lake of the Brahmaputra River basin, showing the richest diversity of testaceans known to date from any freshwater ecosystem in India. Two species are new records from Assam, while all species are new to this Ramsar site. Our results show a Lobosea/Filosea ratio of 2.0, qualitative importance of Euglyphidae and Centropyxidae = Difflugidae and species richness of Difflugia a; Centropyxis.
    Attribution
    Sharma B.K., Sharma S. (2011). Journal of Threatened Taxa 7(3) pp. 1947-1950; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o2664.1947-50