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4 documents found tagged feeding [X]
  • Title
    Effect of human feeding on the road mortality of Rhesus Macaques on National Highway - 7 routed along Pench Tiger Reserve, Madhya Pradesh, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    In Hindu mythology, Hanuman is worshipped as the monkey god and therefore there is a great reverence for macaques all across the country. Hindu devotees consider it their sacred duty to feed macaques along road, temples, parks and other public areas. Unfortunately, such food provisioning alters the habitat, food choice and behaviour of macaques. We studied the impact of feeding by humans on Rhesus Macaque Macaca mulatta feeding behaviour, distribution and also assessed the increased risk of accidents in the 11km road stretch of National Highway passing through Kanha-Pench corridor, from August 2009 to July 2010. Seasonal changes in macaque distribution and group sizes were assessed based on foot and vehicle transects. The numbers of road kills were monitored in early morning and late evening hours for different seasons. Five groups of macaques were occupying a minimum of 1.1 to a maximum of 1.7km stretch, together covering about 7.3km of road. Group size varied significantly in relation to the availability of food on the road. During the study, 54 macaques succumbed to road accidents. Maximum roadkill occurred during summer because of the greater inflow of tourists. Unless concerted efforts are made to increase awareness among people of the hazards of road-side feeding, incidences of macaque mortality are likely to increase.
    Attribution
    Pragatheesh A. (2011). Journal of Threatened Taxa 4(3) pp. 1656-1662; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o2669.1656-62
  • Title
    Some aspects of the ecology of the Indian Giant Squirrel Ratufa indica (Erxleben, 1777) in the tropical forests of Mudumalai Wildlife Sanctuary, southern India and their conservation implications
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    The Indian Giant Squirrel Ratufa indica, an endemic species to India, is widely distributed from the evergreen to moist and dry deciduous forests of Western and Eastern Ghats and the central Indian hills. We studied its population distribution, activity, feeding, ranging and nesting behaviour across three major habitats in the tropical forests of Mudumalai Wildlife Sanctuary, southern India, during 1998-2000 to manage the species effectively. Extensive survey of the three major habitats—tropical moist, dry deciduous and dry thorn—in the sanctuary shows that its distribution is continuous in moist and dry deciduous forests with good canopy contiguity and patchy along riverine areas in dry thorn and dry deciduous forests with sparse trees and broken canopy. Density estimates using 55 direct sightings from 199 km line transects show a mean of 2.9 (plus or minus 0.313) squirrels/km2. Daylight activity and feeding patterns assessed through 24,098 minutes of focal sampling reveal that animals feed and rest equal amounts of time. The diet constitutes seeds, bark, petioles, leaves and fruits from 25 plants, with Tectona grandis as the principal food source (41%). Its home range size varied from 0.8-1.7 ha with a mean of 1.3ha. Nesting characteristics assessed through 83 nests surveyed along 54km transects showed that the squirrel uses 15 of the 33 tree species found, with higher preference to Schleichera oleosa and Mangifera indica. Nest trees are significantly larger in height, gbh and canopy contiguity than nearest non-nest trees, which are attributed to better protection and escape from predators. Maintenance of diverse natural habitats and reduction in anthropogenic pressure are measures suggested for the conservation of giant squirrel populations in the study area.
    Attribution
    Baskaran N., Venkatesan S., Mani J., Srivastava S.K., Desai A.A. (2011). Journal of Threatened Taxa 7(3) pp. 1899-1908; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o2593.1899-908
  • Title
    Diurnal activity budgeting of Large Whistling Teal Dendrocygna bicolor (Vieillot, 1816) (Anseriformes: Anatidae) in Deepor Beel wetlands, Assam, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Diurnal activity budgets of the Large Whistling Teal Dendrocygna bicolor were quantified in Deepor Beel wetlands from March 2007 to January 2008. The study revealed that the Large Whistling Teal utilized 36.1% of time in resting, 37.1% in locomotion, 21.8% of diurnal time in feeding and 3.9% of diurnal time for preening activity. The teal spent
    Attribution
    Das J., Deka H., Saikia P.K. (2011). Journal of Threatened Taxa 12(3) pp. 2263-2267; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o2682.2263-7
  • Title
    Population densities and diurnal activity pattern of the Indian Roller Coracias benghalensis (Aves: Coraciiformes) in Nagapattinam District, Tamil Nadu, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Population densities and diurnal activity pattern of the Indian Roller were studied in Nagapattinam District over three years in different habitats. The agricultural lands supported the highest populations (41km-2), followed by river banks (36km-2) and social forests (32km-2); populations showed yearly variations in numbers and density in all habitats. On average, birds were observed to spend most of the day scanning (57%), with the remainder divided among feeding (16%), flying, (12%), preening (10%) and resting (5%). Some variations in activity breakdown were observed between time blocks, seasons and habitats.
    Attribution
    Asokan S., Ali A.M.S., Manikannan R., Nithiyanandam G.T. (2010). Journal of Threatened Taxa 10(2) pp. 1185-1191; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o2308.1185-91