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3 documents found tagged forest department [X]
  • Title
    Multi-stakeholder perceptions of efficiency in biodiversity conservation at limited access forests of the southern Western Ghats, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Biodiversity conservation is a collaborative effort involving numerous stakeholders. Attempting to balance different interests and developing effective working relationships between stakeholders is vital for successfully addressing issues of biodiversity conservation. Presently, biodiversity conservation in India is monopolised by state forest departments (FD) with negligible participation from local communities (who are directly affected by forest laws) and researchers (whose work can improve conservation). This study examines the efficiency of multiple stakeholders-local communities, FD, researchers and politicians in conserving biodiversity at the Anamalai - Palni Hills of the southern Western Ghats in Tamil Nadu. Efficiency here is defined as the amount of positive assistance stakeholders provide towards conserving biodiversity. A systematic sampling strategy through self-administered questionnaires was used to understand stakeholders perception of one another and the challenges they faced. The results highlight the FD as having the highest efficiency in conserving biodiversity followed by local communities, researchers and lastly, political leaders. Stakeholder evaluation of one another efficiency revealed a homogenous opinion towards local communities and the FD. However, a considerable difference was observed towards researchers whereby their efficiency was rated lower by local communities in comparison to the FD. Dependency on forest resources that was curbed by the FD invariably affected the attitude of local communities towards biodiversity conservation. On the other hand, low pay rolling schemes, inadequate facilities and political interference hinder the management capabilities of the FD. Increased research and outreach activities would benefit Kodaikanal and Theni, provided a collaborative effort to conserve biodiversity is pursued.
    Attribution
    Kanagavel A., Pandya R., Prithvi A., Raghavan R. (2013). Journal of Threatened Taxa 11(5) pp. 4529-4536; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o3439.4529-36
  • Title
    Community and conservation reserves in southern India: status, challenges and opportunities
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Community Reserves and Conservation Reserves illustrate a community-based co-management model, a first of its kind within the protected area (PA) network of India. Such reserves mark a shift towards an inclusive and decentralised approach within PAs in the country. Three such reserves in southern India: the Aghanashini Lion-tailed Macaque Conservation Reserve, Kadalundi-Vallikunnu Community Reserve and Thirupaddaimaradur Conservation Reserve, were selected to examine the reasons for their creation, management and stakeholder dynamics, with an aim to review their productivity and potential replicability. The study was carried out through semi-structured interviews with Forest Department officials, local community members and researchers working in the three reserves. Insufficient interaction between the stakeholders appeared to be a common issue in two reserves. The functioning of the reserves was also influenced, and in some cases negatively affected, by local politics. Financial stability was crucial in the functioning of reserves, as was consistency in interaction and appropriate monitoring of management plans. These elements are recommended for sustaining such reserves and creating community-based management systems for conservation, to support an inclusive approach to PA management.
    Attribution
    Kanagavel A., Pandya R., Sinclair C., Prithvi A., Raghavan R. (2013). Journal of Threatened Taxa 17(5) pp. 5256-5265; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o3541.5256-65
  • Title
    Current status of Western Hoolock Gibbon Hoolock hillock Harlan in West Garo Hills, Meghalaya, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    A rapid status survey of Hoolock Gibbon was carried out in 28 localities of West Garo Hills, Meghalaya in March-April 2007. These 28 were among the 32 localities surveyed previously during 1985-1987 by Alfred & Sati (1990). Gibbons were found in only 15 of the 28 localities. Only 25 groups of gibbon totaling 82 individuals were observed, compared to 36 groups with 111 individuals recorded at the same sites 20 years ago. Adults comprised nearly 61% of the total individuals, followed by infants 16%, juveniles 13% and sub-adults 10%. While the proportion in the adult age class had decreased from 67% in 1985-87, the proportion of individuals in all other age classes showed slight increase. The sex ratio of males: females was 1:1 for adults as well as sub-adults, which was the same as in 1985-87 survey. The modal group size was three (44% of groups) as before. However, the next frequent group size was four (28% of groups), whereas previously the second most frequent group size was two (30% of groups). Twenty percent of groups had two individuals and 8% of groups comprised of five individuals. The Hoolock Gibbon population in the West Garo Hills showed a decreasing trend of 26.2% (82 individuals out of 111 individuals) in 28 localities, when compared with the previously documented numbers. The major reasons of their decline are anthropogenic disturbances such as tree felling for domestic and commercial uses; intermittent cutting of new forest patches for fresh jhum cultivation, often resulting into canopy gaps as well as habitat loss; livestock grazing and poaching.
    Attribution
    Sati J.P. (2011). Journal of Threatened Taxa 2(3) pp. 1527-1534; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o2292.1520-6