A clean list of Odonata names have been uploaded on IBP based on Subramanian, K.A. and Babu, R. (2017). Checklist of Odonata (Insecta) of India. Version 3.0.

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12 documents found tagged habitat [X]
  • Title
    On the status of the Long-tailed Marmot Marmota caudata (Mammalia: Rodentia: Sciuridae) in Kargil, Ladakh (Indian Trans-Himalaya)
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Two species of marmots occur in India, the Himalayan Marmot Marmota himalayana and the Long-tailed Marmot or Golden Marmot Marmota caudata. Marmots constitute part of the diet of some globally endangered carnivores in the Trans-Himalaya, yet studies on marmots in India are scanty. Besides, the status of the Long-tailed Marmot is still unknown in India. Considering this, a survey was carried out in Rangdum Valley, Kargil between May and July 2011 to collect baseline information on the Long-tailed Marmot. Trails and roads were explored through walk and slow moving vehicle, respectively. The Long-tailed Marmot was found to have a density of 14.31±2.10 per sq.km. and an encounter rate of 2.86±0.42 per km. Most of the observations of Long-tailed Marmot were in hilly areas (77.7%), lower slope (48.8%) and herbaceous meadow (38.0%). The current information is expected to bring concern towards this lesser known species in India.
    Attribution
    Tanveer Ahmed, Mohammad Shoeb, Pankaj Chandan & Afifullah Khan, Journal of Threatened Taxa, Vol 8, No 9 (2016); pp. 9171–9176 http://dx.doi.org/10.11609/jott.2731.8.9.9171-9176
  • Title
    Notes on the distribution, habitat, and behavior of Northern Tree Shrew Tupaia belangeri (Mammalia: Scandentia: Tupaiidae) in Tripura, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    A preliminary note on the habitat characteristics and the foraging behavior of Northern Tree Shrew, Tupaia belangeri (Wager, 1841), from Tripura is provided. 
    Attribution
    Majumder Joydeb, Agarwala B.K. (2015). Journal of Threatened Taxa 1(7) pp. 6841-6842; doi:10.11609/jott.1799.6841-6842
  • Title
    Avian diversity and density estimation of birds of the Indian Institute of Forest Management Campus, Bhopal, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    A study to find out the bird diversity at the Indian Institute of Forest Management (IIFM), Bhopal, was carried out over a period of nine months from July 2012 to March 2013. IIFM is located on a hill facing Bhadbhada barrage in Bhopal. Physiographically the area is classified as Vindhayan Hills. A total of 106 bird species belonging to 52 families were recorded during the study covering an area of about 93 hectares. The study area was divided into three major habitat types: open scrub, dry deciduous, and urbanized. Bird species were classified into eight feeding guilds: carnivore, ground insectivore, sallying insectivore, canopy and bark insectivore, nectar insectivore, general insectivore, frugivore and water birds. Of the total 106 species observed, 27 species were recorded as winter visitors. Density analysis was done using DISTANCE software and density was found out to be 32.7 birds per hectare. Rank abundance curve was used for assessing species composition in different habitats and during different seasons. In terms of both richness and evenness, open scrub scored the highest rank (72 species, and most even distribution of species). Higher species richness with lower species evenness was recorded during winter season for all the habitats.
    Attribution
    Aggarwal Anjali, Tiwari Govind, Harsh Sprih (2015). Journal of Threatened Taxa 2(7) pp. 6891-6902; doi:10.11609/jott.1850.6891-6902
  • Title
    Habitat utilization by wetland birds of Munderikadavu, a proposed bird sanctuary in northern Kerala, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Munderikadavu is rich in avifaunal diversity. A total of 82 species of birds from 36 families belonging to 13 orders were recorded in the wetland including wetland dependant species. Lowland vegetation had the highest species richness (46 species) followed by upland (41 species), aerial (38 species), emergent vegetation (22 species) and paddy fields (21 species).  Open water had the lowest species richness. Upland vegetation had the highest species diversity (H′-3.19) followed by aerial (H′-2.52).  There was more species overlap between emergent and low land vegetations (Cm-0.7).  The threats in Munderikadavu wetland were dumping of waste and conversion of cultivation land into shrimp farming area. Thus land use changes need to be regulated in order to conserve the wetland and bird community.  
    Attribution
    Roshnath R., Shruthi V. (2015). Journal of Threatened Taxa 12(7) pp. 7870-7878; doi:10.11609/jott.2377.7870-7878
  • Title
    A preliminary study on the activity budget of post released Eastern Hoolock Gibbon Hoolock leuconedys (Mammalia: Primates: Hylobatidae) in Mehao Wildlife Sanctuary, Arunachal Pradesh, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    The Wildlife Trust of India has taken a long term responsibility to identify a suitable habitat for the threatened families of Eastern Hoolock Gibbon from a village called Dello in Arunachal Pradesh to a nearby forested area which was the earlier home of this species. There is an ongoing successful rescue and translocation programme since November, 2011 in which four Eastern Hoolock Gibbon families comprising 11 individuals were translocated in three different habitat types in and around the forested area of the Mehao Wildlife Sanctuary.  Post-release monitoring is an obvious and required technique to study the rescued families of Eastern Hoolock Gibbons after translocation to confirm their post-release survival and better livelihood.  The regular monitoring of the activity patterns has helped to understand the habitat utilization and resource use in the newly released sites. Along with the rescue operation, there is an additional task to find out the potential habitats to define as ideal release sites for gibbons.  The post release monitoring was studied through the instantaneous scan sampling method to collect the information mostly about their activity patterns.  The present study describes the overall activity patterns and resource use in the released gibbons on the basis of utilization of different habitat types.  It was observed that the ranging pattern was mostly influenced by the resource availability and forest type.  The gibbon family released in the denser forest habitat developed a general food habit whereas the family from the thinner forest area became the specialist consumer.  However, further detailed study with sufficient data is required to comment on their general ecology.  
    Attribution
    Roy Kuladeep, Nautiyal Himani, Dasgupta Soumya (2015). Journal of Threatened Taxa 12(7) pp. 7862-7869; doi:10.11609/jott.2376.7862-7869
  • Title
    A checklist of the winter bird community in different habitat types of Rosekandy Tea Estate of Assam, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    This study was aimed at preparing an inventory of the avifauna and to document the species composition of birds during winter in different habitat types of Rosekandy Tea Estate of Cachar District of Assam. Four habitat types, viz., tea plantation, ecotone zone, secondary growth forest and water bodies were selected within the tea estate and surveyed from mid-December 2010 (early winter) to mid-April 2011 (late winter) covering four months of survey. A total of 88 species were recorded during the survey period with the highest number of species in ecotone zone (n=63), followed by secondary forest (n=60), tea plantation (n=48) and water bodies (n=17). The species were further categorized into different feeding and habitat guilds to study the distribution of bird species in different habitat types according to various guilds.
    Attribution
    Ahmed A., Dey M. (2014). Journal of Threatened Taxa 2(6) pp. 5478-5484; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o3246.5478-84
  • Title
    Additional record of Batasio merianiensis (Chaudhuri 1913), a catfish (Teleostei: Bagridae) in upper Brahmaputra River drainage in Arunachal Pradesh, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    This paper communicates the extension of the distribution range of Batasio merianiensis in Sille River in the upper Brahmaputra drainage, East Siang District, Arunachal Pradesh. Detailed examinations of the specimens revealed existence of few morphological variations against those reported by Heok Hee Ng in 2009 on the following characteristics: by having a longer preanal (70.4-73.4 vs. 66.3-68.2% SL); a longer prepectoral (25.1-29.3 vs. 21.4-25.7% SL); a longer adipose-fin base (22.0-27.6 vs. 16.9-22.2% SL); a shorter post-adipose distance (11.6-13.4 vs.13.4-15.5% SL); a deeper body at anus (depth 18.3-20.8 vs.15.2-18.4% SL) and broader head (width 17.6-20.0 vs.13.5-16.2 % HL). Few additional characters of the fish are included along with brief information on its habitat. The LIPUM, the semi-traditional method of fishing in the river is identified as a major threat to this species.
    Attribution
    Tamang L., Sinha B. (2014). Journal of Threatened Taxa 5(6) pp. 5738-5743; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o3516.5738-43
  • Title
    Avian diversity in the Naliya Grassland, Abdasa Taluka, Kachchh, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Naliya Grassland is one of the significant grasslands of Gujarat. In this study the importance of the Naliya Grassland has been explored with special reference to avian diversity. Field work for the study was carried out throughout the year of 2007 on a monthly basis covering three distinct seasons to explore avian diversity. A total of 177 species belonging to 54 families were recorded wherein most species belonged to the family Accipitridae (20 species) followed by Alaudidae (11 species). Of the total families, five were represented by more than seven species, 18 families by 3-7 species and 31 families by one or two species respectively. Among the species observed, 16 species ware globally threatened (three Critically Endangered, four Endangered and nine Near Threatened). Most of the species were chiefly terrestrial (68.2%), about 23.9% species were freshwater dependant and 7.9% utilized mixed habitats. Maximum species richness was recorded in the monsoons and minimum in summer. Constant turnover and fluctuation in species richness occurred because of seasonal immigration and emigration. Maximum emigration took place during February and March and maximum immigration occurred during June and July. Many water dependant birds attracted to the flooded grassland during the monsoons explained the high species richness during this season. In winter, the area was inhabited by resident species as well as many migratory species.
    Attribution
    Munjpara Sandeep B, Gadhvi Indra R (2012). Journal of Threatened Taxa 3(4) pp. 2454-2463; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o2679.2454-63
  • Title
    Elephant Elephas maximus Linnaeus (Proboscidea: Elephantidae) migration paths in the Nilgiri Hills, India in the late 1970s
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    The study presented was carried out in 1978 with the support of the Asian Elephant Specialist Group (AsESG) of the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Species Survival Commission (SSC). Its objective was to investigate the impediments to elephant movement in the Nilgiri Hills, in the Western Ghats of India, in an attempt to suggest positive steps to encourage movement through the provision of corridors. The report was left unpublished, but given its importance as a reference document for the conservation of the Asian elephant in the Nilgiris, in 2011 the last two authors decided to publish it. The process of habitat fragmentation has been going on ever since man started agriculture. But this problem has, of late, become much more acute due to mounting pressure on land. The corridor concept applied to wildlife is the provision of a free and, as far as possible, unimpeded way for the passage of wild animals between two wildlife zones. A corridor’s more important function is to prevent wild animals from getting isolated in small pocket-like islands. Maintaining elephant habitat connectivity in and around the Nilgiris rests upon the understanding that elephant populations of the several protected areas of the now Nilgiri Biosphere Reserve must remain active. The first author surveyed the Nilgiris on foot and on elephant back for several months in 1978. It was concluded that four areas (the Nilgiri north slopes and Deccan Plateau, the south and southeastern slopes, the Gudalur Plateau, and the upper plateau) harboured together 10 corridors that needed to be maintained, or restored, or even partially restored.
    Attribution
    Davidar E.R.C., Davidar P., Davidar P., Puyravaud J.P. (2012). Journal of Threatened Taxa 14(4) pp. 3284-3293; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o3008.3284-93
  • Title
    Selection of egg attachment sites by the Indian Golden Gecko Calodactylodes aureus (Beddome, 1870) (Reptilia: Gekkonidae) in Andhra Pradesh, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Some geckos lay eggs at communal egg deposition sites with as many as 300 eggs per site. Selection of egg deposition sites is important to avoid egg damage and predation. We investigated survival rates of communal egg clutches of the Indian Golden Gecko Calodactylodes aureus (Reptilia: Gekkonidae). Our results show that communal clutches have a higher survival rate in sites with water bodies and without anthropogenic activities, in comparison to sites having the opposite combination. These findings are discussed in the context of the status of this gecko.
    Attribution
    Sreekar R., Srinivasulu C., Seetharamaraju M., Srinivasulu C.A. (2010). Journal of Threatened Taxa 11(2) pp. 1268-1272; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o2393.1268-72
  • Title
    Habitat suitability, threats and conservation strategies of Hump-nosed Pit Viper Hypnale hymnal Merrem (Reptilia: Viperidae) found in Western Ghats, Goa, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Recent studies indicate that most species are best conserved in their natural community, which results in niche conservation. Depletion of any species is an irreversible change. In the present study the habitat ecology, threats and conservation strategies for the Hump-nosed Pit Viper Hypnale hypnale are suggested. The present study was undertaken in some protected areas (PAs) of Goa and the cashew plantations adjoining these PAs. H. hypnale prefers cool and moist places; most of the females of this species are found to spend the period from post monsoon to late summer in the cashew plantations adjoining and within the PAs, making them more susceptible to anthropogenic threats. We conclude that this pattern of seasonal changes in habitat use is mostly a consequence of niche conservation. However, this preference for a particular micro-habitat emphasizes the importance for the conservation of this snake population and although the most suitable habitat in the Western Ghats, for this species is included in the protected areas, specific guidelines are needed to assess conservation needs.
    Attribution
    Sawant N.S., Jadhav T.D., Shyama S.K. (2010). Journal of Threatened Taxa 11(2) pp. 1261-1267; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o2490.1261-7
  • Title
    Endemic Marsh Mongoose Herpestes palustris (Carnivora: Herpestidae) of East Kolkata Wetlands, India: a status report
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Marsh Mongoose Herpestes palustris is the only extant endemic mammal of the East Kolkata wetlands, which has been declared a RAMSAR site in 2002. Since its first description by the scientists of the Zoological Survey of India, the population of this species has dwindled to an alarming state due to reclamation of the Salt Lake City and Rajarhat expansion, as well as from other anthropogenic causes. Recently, during a field survey only a small population of this endangered mongoose was found in a single location. Immediate conservation measures are required to be taken by the concerned authorities to stop its probable extinction in the near future.
    Attribution
    Mallick J.K. (2009). Journal of Threatened Taxa 4(1) pp. 215-220; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o1936.215-20