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4 documents found tagged habitat use [X]
  • Title
    An ecological assessment of Hispid Hare Caprolagus hispidus (Mammalia: Lagomorpha: Leporidae) in Manas National Park, Assam, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    This study of the Hispid Hare Caprolagus hispidus in the tall grassland habitat of Manas National Park, Assam during 2009–2010 is the first detailed assessment in northeastern India.  We assessed the status, distribution, habitat use and key threats to this rare and little studied lagomorph species.  After interviewing local forest staff, 20 grassland patches within a survey area of 2.65ha were selected and transects (50x2 m) laid randomly to determine the presence/absence of Hispid Hare by recording pellets and other indirect evidence.  Hare presence was recorded in 17 grassland patches within transects dominated by Imperata cylindrica and Saccharum narenga.  Hispid Hare preferred dry savannah grasslands to wet alluvial grasslands during winter and avoided recently burned patches due to lack of cover and food.  The distribution pattern observed was clumped (s2/a = 6.2), with more evidence of Hispid Hare presence in areas where ground cover was dense, dry and away from water sources. Population density was estimated at 381.55 individuals/km2, which in comparison with other studies indicates that Manas National Park currently holds the highest density of Hispid Hare.  Habitat loss due to overgrazing, unsustainable thatch harvesting, burning of grassland, weed invasion, encroachment and hunting were identified as key threats which must be addressed to ensure survival of this threatened species in the Park.  
    Attribution
    Nath Naba K., Machary Kamal (2015). Journal of Threatened Taxa 15(7) pp. 8195-8204; doi:10.11609/jott.2461.7.15.8195-8204
  • Title
    Ecological observations on the Indian Spiny-tailed Lizard Saara hardwickii (Gray, 1827) (Reptilia: Squamata: Agamidae) in Tal Chhapar Wildlife Sanctuary, Rajasthan, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Observations on the Indian Spiny-tailed Lizard Saara hardwickii (Gray, 1827) were undertaken in Tal Chhapar Wildlife Sanctuary, Rajasthan, India during the monsoons (July) following quadrat sampling that was time-constrained. The study revealed that the area is one of the preferable habitats for the species. A population analysis showed that the relative abundance of the subadults was higher, followed by juveniles and adults during the study period. The beginning of activity of the lizards was found to vary over the study period depending on prevailing weather conditions. The activity pattern was bimodal, except across rain events. The study revealed two important ecological findings about these lizards; complete sealing of burrow during rains which differed from partial sealing on normal days and complete diurnal cycle of body colour changes during the monsoon. Feeding was the predominant activity of this lizard followed by basking, resting and chasing each other. The adult lizards were found to be strictly herbivorous, in spite of an abundance of insects available in the area during the period. Subadults and juveniles were found to eat both plant parts, as well as insects. Microhabitat use such as inside grass clumps was found to be higher followed by barren ground, under shade and on stones.
    Attribution
    Das S.K., Dookia S., Das K., Dutta S.K. (2013). Journal of Threatened Taxa 1(5) pp. 3516-3526; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o2806.484
  • Title
    Habitat and seasonal distribution of Odonata (Insecta) of Mula and Mutha river basins, Maharashtra, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Catchment landscape degradation and habitat modifications of freshwater ecosystems are a primary cause of biodiversity loss in riverine ecosystems all over the world. Many elements of the flora and fauna of freshwater ecosystems are sensitive to the changes in catchment land use and habitat modification. These sensitive taxa are also reliable indicators of freshwater ecosystem health. In the current study we investigate the seasonal and habitat distribution of Odonata (Insecta) across riparian land use types in Mula and Mutha river basins, northern Western Ghats, Maharashtra. There was a difference in the species composition across land use types and across seasons with highest diversity and abundance during the post monsoon period. The highest Odonata diversity was observed in urban areas followed by forest and agriculture fields. There was a loss of 31% of the odonate fauna in the study area over 50 years which could be due to rapid industrialization and urbanization of the region and consequent degradation of freshwater ecosystems. The significance of catchment land use on Odonata diversity and its value in landscape monitoring is discussed.
    Attribution
    Kulkarni A.S., Subramanian K.A. (2013). Journal of Threatened Taxa 7(5) pp. 4084-4095; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o3253.4084-95
  • Title
    Sightings and behavioral observations of Indo-Pacific Humpback Dolphins Sousa chinensis (Osbeck, 1765) along Chennai coast, Bay of Bengal
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Boat-based surveys were used to investigate the presence of Indo-Pacific Humpback Dolphins Sousa chinensis along the coast of Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India. Notes were collected on behavior, group size, coloration patterns and group composition on sighting cetaceans during the surveys. Four groups of Indo-Pacific Humpback Dolphins were sighted near-shore in the month of February 2011, between 10-25 m depth with an average group size of 20 individuals of which 10 individuals were photo-identifiable. Dominant group behavior was aerial display, feeding and traveling. This study gives a basic idea of presence, threats and habitat use of Humpback Dolphin areas along Chennai coast.
    Attribution
    Muralidharan R. (2013). Journal of Threatened Taxa 15(5) pp. 5002-5006; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o3454.5002-6