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9 documents found tagged hemiptera [X]
  • Title
    Seasonal variation of Hemiptera community of a temple pond of Cachar District, Assam, northeastern India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    The study records seven families, 11 genera and 14 species of hemipteran insect community in different seasons in a temple pond near Silchar, Cachar District, Assam, northeastern India. The pond is very rich in macrophytes like Nelumbo nucifera (Water Lotus), Hygrorhiza aristata (Indian Lotus), Cynodon dactylon (Bermuda Grass), Philotria sp. etc. The hemipteran families recorded in the system were Corixidae, Gerridae, Aphididae, Mesoveliidae, Notonectidae, Nepidae and Belostomatidae. The species were Micronecta haliploides, Micronecta (Basileonecta) scutellaris scutellaris (Stål) (Corixidae); Neogerris parvula (Stål), Limnogonus nitidus (Mayr), Tenagogerris sp., Rhagadotarsus sp. (Gerridae); Enithares ciliata (Fabricius), Anisops lundbladiana Landsbury, (Notonectidae); Diplonychus rusticus (Fabricius) and Diplonychus annulatus (Fabricius) (Belostomatidae), Rhopalosiphum nymphaeae (Linnaeus) (Aphididae), Ranatra elongata (Fabricius), Ranatra varipes varipes (Stål) (Nepidae) and Mesovelia vittigera Horváth (Mesoveliidae). The highest population of Hemiptera was recorded during the post-monsoon followed by the pre-monsoon and the monsoon periods. The lowest was recorded in the winter. Shannon Weiner diversity index (H/) and evenness index (J/) showed the highest diversity and evenness during the post monsoon period. Berger Parker index of dominance (d) was found highest in winter. In winter both diversity and density were the lowest. The study revealed the presence of four dominant species and three sub-dominant species in the pond. Insect diversity did not show any significant relationship with the environmental variables.
    Attribution
    Das K., Gupta S. (2012). Journal of Threatened Taxa 11(4) pp. 3050-3058; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o2724.3050-8
  • Title
    Distribution of aquatic insects in phumdis (floating island) of Loktak Lake, Manipur, northeastern India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    A study was made on the temporal fluctuations of distribution of aquatic insects around Phumdi Live (PL), Phumdi Mixed (PM) and Phumdi Dry (PD) areas of Loktak Lake. Phumdis are a heterogeneous mass of soil, vegetation and organic matter. The study revealed the presence of predators, and the absence of herbivores and detritivores in both PL and PM, the PD area was totally devoid of insects. Although both the habitats supported the same predator groups hemiptera and odonata, diversity and density in terms of family and species were higher in PL than in PM. Temporal fluctuations revealed that the Shannon-Weiner’s Diversity Index values were highest in June for both PL (0.726) and PM (0.47). In both the sites the highest density was recorded in February. The relative abundance of hemiptera was higher than that of odonata in most of the months in PL. Phumdi Mixed was represented by one species of hemiptera only, in the month of February and dominated by odonates otherwise. Community composition of odonata larvae did not show any difference between the two habitats. Although the study revealed low diversity and density of insects in both sites, the PL community provided a better habitat to aquatic insects than that of PM. These are of value as fish food and in turn for fish production.
    Attribution
    Takhelmayum K., Gupta S. (2011). Journal of Threatened Taxa 6(3) pp. 1856-1861; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o2526.1856-61
  • Title
    Diet of three insectivorous birds in Nagapattinam District, Tamil Nadu, India - a preliminary study
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    The dietary composition of the White-breasted Kingfisher Halcyon smyrnensis, the Small Bee-eater Merops orientalis and the Black Drongo Dicrurus macrocercus was studied between 2005 and 2006 in Nagapattinam District, Tamil Nadu, India by analyzing regurgitated pellets. The analysis revealed that the White-breasted Kingfisher preys mainly on arthropods (83.40%) and less on vertebrates; seven orders of insects were identified, with Coleoptera, Hemiptera, Hymenoptera and Orthoptera predominant. The small bee-eater diet is composed of Coleoptera (22.3%), Hymenoptera (20.8%), Hemiptera (14.1%), Orthoptera (12.6%), Odonata (10.7%), Lepidoptera (10.4%) and Diptera (8.6%). Beetles were also found to be the most frequent prey (23.7%) in the diet of black drongos, followed by Hemiptera (21.6%), Orthoptera (19.3%), Hymenoptera (14.4%), Lepidoptera (7.5%), Diptera (6.8%) and Odonata (6.0%).
    Attribution
    Asokan S., Ali A.M.S., Manikannan R. (2009). Journal of Threatened Taxa 6(1) pp. 327-330; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o2145.327-30
  • Title
    Scale Insects and Mealy Bugs of India (Insecta: Homoptera: Coccoidea)
    Type
    Miscellaneous
    Description
    The Scale insects and mealy bugs fall under the Superfamily Coccoidea, Order Homoptera. The name refers to their secretion of waxy scales or mealy that serves as a protective covering. They range in size from 1.5 mm to 25 mm in length. They are economically important insects, since many species attack different parts of plant and feed by sucking the plant sap. About 7,500 species of Scale insects and Mealy bugs are known at present from the world which inhabits almost all parts of the globe, in all floral habitats, from the tundra to the tropics. The Indian diversity accounts to 409 species under 166 genera spread over 14 families and 14 subfamilies (Varshney; 1992, 2002) and other scattered literature.
    Attribution
    Zoological Survey of India, Western Regional Centre, Pune
  • Title
    Check List of Nepomorpha from India (Hemiptera: Heteroptera)
    Type
    Miscellaneous
    Description
    This Checklist contains the names of 154 species of Nepomorpha from India
    Attribution
    Southern Regional Station, Zoological Survey of India, Chennai
  • Title
    A Checklist of Membracidae from India (Insecta: Homoptera: Cicadomorpha: Membracoidea)
    Type
    Miscellaneous
    Description
    The family Membracidae commonly known as “Tree hoppers”, comprises of a distinct group of small phytophagous insects belonging to auchenorrhynchous Homoptera occurring in all the major geographic regions, their diversity and abundance reaching a peak in the tropical and sub tropical areas. These homopteran bugs are easily recognized by the structure of pronotum which takes curious bizarre shapes in different species that have earned the name “Cow bugs” or “Horn bugs”. Globally, the family Membracidae comprises of 3200 extant species accommodated under 400 genera. 235 species under 41 genera so far reported from India are presented in this check list. Interestingly, 38.7% of the species so far known from India are occurring in Western Ghats
    Attribution
    Southern Regional Centre, Zoological Survey of India, Chennai
  • Title
    Checklist of Indian Tessarotomidae (Insecta: Hemiptera: Heteroptera: Pentatomoidea)
    Type
    Miscellaneous
    Description
    Tessaratomids are relatively large bugs under the Superfamily Pentatomoidea comprising of 240 species under 55 genera (Rolston et al., 1993, Rider 2006 and Henry 2009). They are characterized by the proportionately small head, short labium and large sternal plate between the middle and hind coxae. These bugs are usually phytophagus, although some act as agricultural pest such as Tessaratoma papillosa, the pest of litchi (Litchi chinesis). A few species are consumed by human beings as food in some countries. Some tessaratomids exhibit parental care of their eggs and offspring. A chemical secreted by certain tessaratomids may cause damage if comes in contact with the human skin and may even cause temporary blindness. Indian tessaratomids are represented by 41 species under 14 genera of 2 subfamilies.
    Attribution
    Zoological Survey of India, New Alipore
  • Title
    Checklist of Indian Burrower Bugs (Insecta - Hemiptera - Heteroptera - Cydnidae)
    Type
    Miscellaneous
    Description
    The Cydnidae is one of the most important and extensively occurring families after Pentatomidae within the Superfamily, Pentatomoidea. As many of the representatives of this family live in soil and feed on roots, they are commonly known as ‘Burrower bugs’ or ‘Burrowing bugs’. The Cydnidae of the World includes 73 genera and 526 species (Jerzy A. Lis, 1999). In India, we have a record of 28 genera and 72 species.
    Attribution
    Zoological Survey of India, New Alipore, Kolkata
  • Title
    Checklist Of Indian Assassin Bugs (Insecta: Hemiptera: Reduviidae)
    Type
    Miscellaneous
    Description
    This checklist report 465 species belong to 144 genera under 14 subfamilies of the family Reduviidae from India
    Attribution
    Biswabrota Biswas and Bulganin Mitra, Zoological Survey of India, New Alipore, Kolkata-700 053