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137 documents found tagged lepidoptera [X]
  • Title
    A report of False Tibetan Cupid Tongeia pseudozuthus Huang, 2001 (Lepidoptera: Lycaenidae) from the Upper Dibang Valley, Arunachal Pradesh - An addition to the Indian butterfly fauna
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    We report the occurence of false Tibetan cupid Tongeia pseudozuthus Huang, 2001 from India based on two records from Dibang Valley, Arunachal Pradesh.
    Attribution
    Seena N. Karimbumkara, Rajkamal Goswami & Purnendu Roy, Journal of Threatened Taxa, Vol 8, No 6 (2016); pp. 8927–8929 http://dx.doi.org/10.11609/jott.2279.8.6.8927-8929
  • Title
    Butterflies of the Rice Research Station and adjoining locality in Chinsurah, West Bengal, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Chinsurah is a small town on the western bank of the Hugli River, a distributary of the river Ganges. A survey from November 2006 to June 2014 with photographic documentation on the butterfly community in Chinsurah revealed the presence of a total of 70 species representing 53 genera in five families; most dominant family was the Nymphalidae having 34.3% of the total species. Six species are legally protected; one species under Schedule I; three species under Schedule II; and two species under Schedule IV of the Indian Wildlife (Protection) Act, 1972. Rare species like Pareronia avator (Moore), Mahathala ameria (Hewitson) and Melanitis zitenius (Herbst) were recorded in this rapidly degrading habitat. This study may help in planning conservation strategies in urban areas and sustainable development as well.
    Attribution
    Somnath Mandal, Journal of Threatened Taxa, Vol 8, No 5 (2016); pp. 8804–8813 http://dx.doi.org/10.11609/jott.2815.8.5.8804-8813
  • Title
    Butterflies of Garhwal, Uttarakhand, western Himalaya, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Thirty percent of butterfly species that occur in India are found in the Garhwal region of the western Himalaya, which comprise six districts of Uttarakhand State with five major vegetation types lying between the catchments of the Ganga and Yamuna rivers.  The annotated checklist compiled here for this region comprises 407 species and takes into account all the species recorded since 1899, when the first list of 323 species was prepared by Mackinnon & de Nicéville on the ‘butterflies of Mussoorie and its adjacent areas’.  Over a 20 year period (1986–1990; 2000–June 2015) the present authors maintained detailed notes and were able personally to record 349 species.  This information is presented in a checklist, together with details of the month, year and site of each record, relative abundance, Indian Wildlife (Protection) Act, 1972 (IWPA) status, as well as references of earlier records made by other authors in Garhwal for those species that the authors were not able to record themselves.  Forty-nine species recorded in the region have been placed under various schedules of IWPA; only one species, the Golden Emperor Dilipa morgiana Westwood, is listed in Schedule I Part IV, the others being mainly included under Schedule II Part II.  The paper also discusses new range extensions and significant records (past and present), identifies major biotic factors that threaten butterfly diversity in Garhwal, and suggests the scope for butterfly ecotourism in the state as an option for long term conservation.  
    Attribution
    Singh Arun P.; Journal of Threatened Taxa Vol 8, No 4 (2016) 26/4/2016; pp. 8666-8697; 10.11609/jott.2254.8.4.8666-8697
  • Title
    A case study of butterfly road kills from Anaikatty Hills, Western Ghats, Tamil Nadu, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
     Anaikatty Hills of the Western Ghats in Tamil Nadu witness the annual spectacle of mass movement of lakhs of butterflies.  The present paper examines the impact of vehicular traffic on this ‘butterfly migration’ through a survey of butterfly mortality along a road stretch in Anaikatty Hills.  A high rate of mortality due to road traffic was observed during the mass movement of butterflies.  One-hundred-and-thirty-five butterfly road kills belonging to three families, nine genera and 12 species were recorded during the study.  The proportion of nymphalid butterflies among the road kills (70%) was very high compared to their respective share in the background population (39%), indicating a higher road mortality risk for nymphalids.  The conservation significance of the road traffic impact on butterfly assemblage and management options are discussed. 
    Attribution
    Sony R. K., Arun P. R. (2015). Journal of Threatened Taxa 14(7) pp. 8154-8158; doi:10.11609/jott.1743.7.14.8154-8158
  • Title
    Moth diversity of Tawang District, Arunachal Pradesh, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    This paper documents results of an expedition to Tawang district (Arunachal Pradesh) by the Zoological Survey of India, during the period 27th September 2009 to 15th October 2009. Field camps were established at two places i.e. Lumla and Zemmethang. From these two camps, collections of moths were made at various localities by installing light traps. During the survey, more than 250 morpho-species were collected, of which 102 species pertaining to 15 families were identified. The analysis of the fauna revealed that the moth fauna of the area is dominated by the family Geometridae, followed by Arctiidae, Drepanidae, Crambidae, Lymantriidae, Noctuidae, Uraniidae, Lasiocampidae, Sphingidae, Pyralidae, Zygaenidae, Bombycidae, Saturniidae, Pantheidae and Notodontidae.
    Attribution
    Chandra K., Sambath S. (2013). Journal of Threatened Taxa 1(5) pp. 3565-3570; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o2718.966
  • Title
    A preliminary checklist of butterflies recorded from Jeypore-Dehing forest, eastern Assam, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    The paper describes some of the rare butterfly species recorded during February 2010-October 2011 in the lowland semi-evergreen Jeypore rainforest of upper Assam along with a preliminary checklist of the area. Altogether, 292 species were recorded based on the survey conducted in different seasons. Important sightings include the report of White Punch longicaudata, Pale Striped Dawnfly Capilia zennara, Blue Quaker Pithecops fulgens etc and range extension of Andaman Yellow-banded Flat Celaenorrhinus andamanicus hanna to northeastern India.
    Attribution
    Gogoi M.J. (2013). Journal of Threatened Taxa 2(5) pp. 3684-3696; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o3022.3684-96
  • Title
    Rediscovery of the Empress, Sasakia funebris Leech (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae: Nymphalinae: Apaturini) after 88 years in India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    The sighting of an Empress, Sasakia funebris, is reported from upper Debang Valley District, Arunachal Pradesh. This is the first record of this butterfly after almost nine decades in India. Observations on the habitat and habits of the species are given.
    Attribution
    Singh A.P. (2013). Journal of Threatened Taxa 10(5) pp. 4514-4516; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o3428.4514-6
  • Title
    The butterfly community of an urban wetland system - a case study of Oussudu Bird Sanctuary, Puducherry, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    In a study on the butterfly community of the Oussudu (Ousteri) Bird Sanctuary and its environs at Puducherry, a total of 63 butterfly species belonging to 47 genera under five families were recorded which included two endemics and three Schedule I species. Nymphalidae was the most diverse and abundant butterfly family of the area followed by Pieridae. The paper also discusses the abundance and species assemblage pattern in the local butterfly fauna along with their legal/protection status and distribution patterns in the study area.
    Attribution
    Murugesan M., Arun P.R., Prusty B.A.K. (2013). Journal of Threatened Taxa 12(5) pp. 4672-4678; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o3056.4672-8
  • Title
    CEPF Western Ghats Special Series: Range extension of Malabar Tree Nymph Idea malabarica (Moore) (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae) to northern Western Ghats of Maharashtra and a review of distribution records
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Barring a single record of Ghosh et al. (1990) from Raigarh District as a new report for Maharashtra State, no further records of Idea malabarica from any of the districts of Maharashtra, northern Western Ghats is available. The occurrence of Malabar Tree Nymph, an endemic butterfly of southern Western Ghats in the new geographical area is interesting to study. A distribution map for Idea malabarica in Western Ghats is provided based on the published records.
    Attribution
    Jadhav M., Sharma R.M. (2013). Journal of Threatened Taxa 1(5) pp. 3556-3558; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o3267.949
  • Title
    The moths (Lepidoptera: Heterocera) of northern Maharashtra: a preliminary checklist
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    A preliminary checklist of moth species collected in north Maharashtra is presented based on studies carried out in various localities from June 2009 to June 2010. From a total of 728 individuals, 245 morphospecies, placed in 177 genera and 20 families, were recognized. Almost a third of these species were collected as singletons and can be considered as rare. The moth fauna is very rich in arboreal feeding forms, indicating that the area is a fairly undisturbed forest patch. Of the 20 families encountered, Erebidae, Noctuidae, Crambidae, Geometridae and Sphingidae are the most diverse.
    Attribution
    Gurule S.A., Nikam S.M. (2013). Journal of Threatened Taxa 12(5) pp. 4693-4713; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o2555.4693-713
  • Title
    Butterfly species diversity, relative abundance and status in Tropical Forest Research Institute, Jabalpur, Madhya Pradesh, central India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    A survey was conducted to record the butterfly diversity, status and occurrence of butterfly species in the Tropical Forest Research Institute campus area of 109 hectare within Jabalpur city from June 2008 to May 2009. A total of 62 species of butterflies belonging to 47 genera of 5 families viz., Papilionidae (5 species), Pieridae (9 species), Nymphalidae (25 species), Lycaenidae (16 species) and Hesperiidae (7 species) were recorded. Of the total 65 species, 24 (37%) were commonly occurring, 16 (26%) were very common, 2 (3%) were not rare, 17 (26%) were rare and 6 (8%) were very rarely occurring. Of these eight species are listed in the Indian Wildlife (protection) Act 1972. The observations support the importance of the Tropical Forest Research Institute campus which provides a habitat and valuable resources for butterflies.
    Attribution
    Tiple A.D. (2012). Journal of Threatened Taxa 7(4) pp. 2713-2717; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o2656.2713-7
  • Title
    Butterflies of the Garo Hills of Meghalaya, northeastern India: their diversity and conservation
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    The Garo Hills of Meghalaya, northeastern India, form the westernmost boundary of the globally recognized Indo-Myanmar Biodiversity Hotspot. The butterfly fauna of the Garo Hills is expected to be diverse, but it has not been properly sampled before. We surveyed butterflies in Balpakram National Park, Baghmara Reserve Forest and Siju Wildlife Sanctuary in southern Garo Hills, and Nokrek National Park in Western Garo Hills during four visits amounting to 49 days spread over two seasons, pre-monsoon (April-May) and post-monsoon (November-December), between 2008 and 2010. Here we report 298 butterfly species for the Garo Hills, eight of which are legally protected under Schedule I and 33 under Schedule II of the Indian Wildlife (Protection) Act, 1972. Our species accumulation curve suggests that many species remain to be discovered in the Garo Hills, and we expect the total species richness to be closer to 600-650 species. Little quantitative information exists on populations and seasonal occurrence of butterflies in India. Therefore, we recorded the number of individuals of each species in one or three hour counts during our surveys, and here we report season-wise relative abundances of 298 species from 3,736 individuals. We also report significant range extensions of two Schedule I species: Elymnias peali and Prothoe franck regalis, from the Garo Hills. These findings underscore the significance of the Garo Hills for butterfly conservation in India, and our work forms a baseline for future quantitative work on the diversity and conservation of butterflies in this biodiversity hotspot.
    Attribution
    Kunte K., Sondhi S., Sangma B.M., Lovalekar R., Tokekar K., Agavekar G. (2012). Journal of Threatened Taxa 10(4) pp. 2933-2992; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o2945.2933-92