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3 documents found tagged local community [X]
  • Title
    How the local community views wildlife conservation: a case of Hastinapur Wildlife Sanctuary, Uttar Pradesh, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    A study was conducted to assess the local community’s attitudes towards wildlife conservation in Hastinapur Wildlife Sanctuary (HWS), Uttar Pradesh, India. It is the largest sanctuary in the state and under the highest anthropogenic pressure. People engage in fishing, livestock grazing, fuel wood/fodder collection, cash cropping of cucurbits in the sandy river banks for sustenance and commercial extraction of sand and grass for construction. These activities threaten the survival of threatened species like Swamp Deer Rucervus duvaucelii, Gangetic Dolphin Platanista gangetica, Smooth-coated Otter Lutrogale perspicillata and Gharial Gavialis gangeticus. Interviews were conducted with heads of randomly selected families and ‘yes/no’ opinions were taken. Questions included direct statements on biodiversity status and relationship with the Sanctuary resources. Data was classified in percent values and it was found that there is no difference in people’s perception on increase, decrease or stability of biodiversity. Further, a majority of people find life around a protected area disadvantageous, or with dismal advantages. Building on this premise the study suggests that a better share in development and alternative livelihood options for the local community of HWS can decrease their dependence on natural resources and improve conservation as a favourable option in the present perceptions of the people.
    Attribution
    Khan Mohd. Shahnawaz, Abbasi Faiza (2015). Journal of Threatened Taxa 2(7) pp. 6934-6939; doi:10.11609/jott.1856.6934-6939
  • Title
    Multi-stakeholder perceptions of efficiency in biodiversity conservation at limited access forests of the southern Western Ghats, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Biodiversity conservation is a collaborative effort involving numerous stakeholders. Attempting to balance different interests and developing effective working relationships between stakeholders is vital for successfully addressing issues of biodiversity conservation. Presently, biodiversity conservation in India is monopolised by state forest departments (FD) with negligible participation from local communities (who are directly affected by forest laws) and researchers (whose work can improve conservation). This study examines the efficiency of multiple stakeholders-local communities, FD, researchers and politicians in conserving biodiversity at the Anamalai - Palni Hills of the southern Western Ghats in Tamil Nadu. Efficiency here is defined as the amount of positive assistance stakeholders provide towards conserving biodiversity. A systematic sampling strategy through self-administered questionnaires was used to understand stakeholders perception of one another and the challenges they faced. The results highlight the FD as having the highest efficiency in conserving biodiversity followed by local communities, researchers and lastly, political leaders. Stakeholder evaluation of one another efficiency revealed a homogenous opinion towards local communities and the FD. However, a considerable difference was observed towards researchers whereby their efficiency was rated lower by local communities in comparison to the FD. Dependency on forest resources that was curbed by the FD invariably affected the attitude of local communities towards biodiversity conservation. On the other hand, low pay rolling schemes, inadequate facilities and political interference hinder the management capabilities of the FD. Increased research and outreach activities would benefit Kodaikanal and Theni, provided a collaborative effort to conserve biodiversity is pursued.
    Attribution
    Kanagavel A., Pandya R., Prithvi A., Raghavan R. (2013). Journal of Threatened Taxa 11(5) pp. 4529-4536; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o3439.4529-36
  • Title
    Community and conservation reserves in southern India: status, challenges and opportunities
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Community Reserves and Conservation Reserves illustrate a community-based co-management model, a first of its kind within the protected area (PA) network of India. Such reserves mark a shift towards an inclusive and decentralised approach within PAs in the country. Three such reserves in southern India: the Aghanashini Lion-tailed Macaque Conservation Reserve, Kadalundi-Vallikunnu Community Reserve and Thirupaddaimaradur Conservation Reserve, were selected to examine the reasons for their creation, management and stakeholder dynamics, with an aim to review their productivity and potential replicability. The study was carried out through semi-structured interviews with Forest Department officials, local community members and researchers working in the three reserves. Insufficient interaction between the stakeholders appeared to be a common issue in two reserves. The functioning of the reserves was also influenced, and in some cases negatively affected, by local politics. Financial stability was crucial in the functioning of reserves, as was consistency in interaction and appropriate monitoring of management plans. These elements are recommended for sustaining such reserves and creating community-based management systems for conservation, to support an inclusive approach to PA management.
    Attribution
    Kanagavel A., Pandya R., Sinclair C., Prithvi A., Raghavan R. (2013). Journal of Threatened Taxa 17(5) pp. 5256-5265; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o3541.5256-65