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5 documents found tagged lycaenidae [X]
  • Title
    Butterflies of the Rice Research Station and adjoining locality in Chinsurah, West Bengal, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Chinsurah is a small town on the western bank of the Hugli River, a distributary of the river Ganges. A survey from November 2006 to June 2014 with photographic documentation on the butterfly community in Chinsurah revealed the presence of a total of 70 species representing 53 genera in five families; most dominant family was the Nymphalidae having 34.3% of the total species. Six species are legally protected; one species under Schedule I; three species under Schedule II; and two species under Schedule IV of the Indian Wildlife (Protection) Act, 1972. Rare species like Pareronia avator (Moore), Mahathala ameria (Hewitson) and Melanitis zitenius (Herbst) were recorded in this rapidly degrading habitat. This study may help in planning conservation strategies in urban areas and sustainable development as well.
    Attribution
    Somnath Mandal, Journal of Threatened Taxa, Vol 8, No 5 (2016); pp. 8804–8813 http://dx.doi.org/10.11609/jott.2815.8.5.8804-8813
  • Title
    Recent report of Dark Himalayan Oakblue Arhopala rama Kollar, 1848 (Lepidoptera: Papilionoidea: Theclinae) from Tenga Valley, Arunachal Pradesh, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    The known distribution range of Arhopala rama ramosa from India is in Manipur (Evans 1932).  However, sighting of this subspecies from Arunachal Pradesh extends its range to Arunachal Pradesh by ca. 570 kilometers from Manipur. Key identifying features have also been mentioned for both the subspecies. 
    Attribution
    Singh Rachit Pratap (2015). Journal of Threatened Taxa 15(7) pp. 8296-8298; doi:10.11609/jott.2469.7.15.8296-8298
  • Title
    Butterflies of Kerala Agricultural University (KAU) campus, Thrissur, Kerala, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    The present study was conducted to understand the species richness of butterflies in the Kerala Agricultural University main campus. The area lies between 10032 -10033 N and 76016-76017 E and is located very close to the Peechi-Vazhani Wildlife Sanctuary. A total of 139 species in six families were recorded from the campus. Family Nymphalidae dominated with 44 species followed by Lycaenidae (35), Hesperiidae (34), Pieridae (13), Papilionidae (12) and Riodinidae (1)
    Attribution
    Aneesh K.S., Adarsh C.K., Nameer P.O. (2013). Journal of Threatened Taxa 9(5) pp. 4422-4440; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o2870.4422-40
  • Title
    A note on the migration of Dark Cerulean Jamides bochus (Stoll) (Lepidoptera: Lycaenidae) in Eravikulam National Park, Idukki District, Kerala, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    The migratory movements of butterflies are poorly documented in Kerala. It’s for the first time the migratory behaviour of the Dark Cerulean Jamides bochus (Stoll) (Lepidoptera: Lycaenidae) was documented from the Kerala part of Western Ghats. The migratory movement was from high ranges of Eravikulam National Park, Idukki district, Kerala at an elevation of 2085m to the lower elevations in a north-east to south-east direction.
    Attribution
    Palot M.J. (2012). Journal of Threatened Taxa 14(4) pp. 3373-3374; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o3244.3373-4
  • Title
    Changing biodiversity scenario in the Himalayan ecosystem: Mussoorie, Uttarakhand, India, as revealed by the study of blue butterflies (Lycaenidae)
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Any change in the population of butterflies is an early warning of pollution or other kinds of habitat degradation. An area rich in butterfly diversity has its own significance in the ecosystem. The current status of butterflies in Mussoorie (Uttarakhand) is reviewed. The degradation of the butterfly-rich spots of Mussoorie is discussed. A comparative chart of 66 species of Lycaenid butterflies compares species collected by earlier authors from Mussoorie with current observations. Some of the rare butterflies species have disappeared, probably due the loss of habitat to developmental activities, use of pesticides in farming, urbanization and other anthropogenic activities.
    Attribution
    Sidhu A.K. (2011). Journal of Threatened Taxa 2(3) pp. 1559-1563; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o2349.1559-63