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5 documents found tagged mammals [X]
  • Title
    A checklist of the vertebrates of Kerala State, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Following the first publication on vertebrates of India (Blanford 1888–1890), a huge wealth of information has been compiled on the vertebrate fauna of various biogeographic zones of the country, especially the Western Ghats.  The state of Kerala comprising of a land area of 38,863km2, 590km coastline, an intricate system of backwaters along the coast, tropical moist forests of the Western Ghats, the highly undulating terrain, and the tropical monsoon is a unique geographical and environmental entity rich in biodiversity.  A region-specific checklist that summarises and documents the current status of vertebrate diversity provides benchmark data for documentation and appreciation of biodiversity at regional level.  Further, with the current rate of global biodiversity loss and concordant conservation efforts, the taxonomic community has a greater responsibility to make scientific information available to scientists, policy makers, politicians, research students and all relevant stakeholders, an attempt that has been made in the present paper.  The State of Kerala has 1847 species of vertebrates in 330 families and 81 orders, of which 386 are endemic to the Western Ghats region (of the Western Ghats - Sri Lanka Hotspot), and 205 species as threatened. Six hundred and eighty species of vertebrates of Kerala have been listed in the various schedules of the Indian Wildlife (Protection) Act, while 148 are listed in the different appendices of CITES.  
    Attribution
    Nameer P. O., J Praveen, Bijukumar A., Palot Muhamed Jafer, Das Sandeep, Raghavan Rajeev (2015). Journal of Threatened Taxa 13(7) pp. 7961-7970; doi:10.11609/jott.1999.7.13.7961-7970
  • Title
    Identification of hairs of some mammalian prey of large cats in Gir Protected Area, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    A system for rapidly identifying hair specimens by its medullary configuration and scale structure was carried out. Cross sections as well as hair imprints and their drawings prepared from microphotographs, taken especially of those species which are the chief prey base of two top carnivore species found in Gir Protected Area i.e. the Asiatic Lion Panthera leo persica and Leopard P. pardus is presented. This facilitates the identification of prey species of the carnivores through their scat analysis.
    Attribution
    Dharaiya N., Soni V.C. (2012). Journal of Threatened Taxa 9(4) pp. 2928-2932; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o3032.2928-32
  • Title
    Mammals of Kalimpong Hills, Darjeeling District, West Bengal, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Neora Valley National Park (NVNP) in the Kalimpong Hills, Darjeeling District, having a wide range of altitudinal variations (183-3,200 m) and climatic conditions and forming an ecological trijunction with Sikkim and Bhutan, is the last virgin wilderness in West Bengal. It is a global hotspot for the unique ecosystem, where tropical, sub-tropical, temperate and sub-temperate forests represent a wealth of biodiversity including many threatened and rare mammals. It is the prime habitat of Ailurus fulgens (estimated population 28-32), Neofelis nebulosa (population unassessed), Ursus thibetanus (18), Bos gaurus (81), Hemitragus jemlahicus (32), Naemorhedus goral (73), Capricornis sumatraensis (89), Rusa unicolor (286), Muntiacus vaginalis (590) and Sus scrofa (615). Discovery of Panthera tigris (20) in 1998 prompted the forest department to include NVNP as a sensitive wildlife zone. Many authors recorded the mammalian diversity in Darjeeling District since the mid-nineteenth century, but most of them referred to the Darjeeling Hills. The documentations on Kalimpong Hills are scarce because of the dense canopy, thick undergrowth and inaccessible terrain, particularly in the pristine forests of Neora Valley. Consequently, a comprehensive compendium of the mammals in this region was not prepared. A study was undertaken in 2008-2009 with a view to bridging this knowledge-gap and presenting an updated account of the mammalian species in this new short-listed World Heritage Site and surrounding forests of the Kalimpong Hills based on literature review, questionnaire survey, direct sighting and indirect evidences. During June-October 1916, N.A. Baptista recorded 29 mammalian species (22 genera) out of 563 specimens collected, from the region. The present study registered 99 species (68 genera) after 94 years.
    Attribution
    Mallick J.K. (2012). Journal of Threatened Taxa 12(4) pp. 3103-3136; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o2418.3103-36
  • Title
    Ladakh Fauna Checklist_August 2013: 68 Birds and 9 Mammals
    Type
    Report
    Description
    Dates: 10th-19th August Place: Manali, Sarchu, Jispa, Tso Kar, Tso Moriri, Shey Marshes, Thiksey, Palam Bridge, Shakti(/serthi), Durbuk,Tso Pangong, Tanglang La, Rotang La, Baralach La, Khardung La. Habitat: Temperate Coniferous. Sub Alpine Forest. Alpine Forest. Cold desert climate. Tundra Valley. High altitude lakes and marshes. Temperature range: <0°C to >30°C (Approx.) Alttitude: 2050m(Manali) - 5359m(Khardung La) (Approx.) Bird Checklist (As per Birds of Indian Subcontinent field guide by Richard Gmimmett, Carol Inskipp, Tim Inskipp): 1.Chukar 2.Bar-headed Goose 3.Ruddy Shelduck 4.Goosander 5.Great Crested Grebe 6.Common Kestrel 7.Lesser / Palla's Fish Eagle 8.Himalayan Vulture 9. Upland Buzzard 10.Common Moorhen 11.Black-necked Crane 12.Black-winged Stilt 13.Lesser Sand Plover 14.Green Sandpiper 15.Common Sandpiper 16.Palla’s Gull 17.Brown-headed Gull 18.Common Tern 19.Tibetan Sandgrouse 20. Common Pigeon 21.Hill Pigeon 22.Oriental Turtle Dove 23.Eurasian Cuckoo 24.Common Hoopoe 25.Eurasian Roller 26.Long-tailed Shrike 27.Eurasian Magpie 28.Large-billed Crow 29.Northern Raven 30.House Crow 31.Red-billed Chough 32.Alpine Chough 33.Great Tit 34.Pale Martin 35.Hume's Short-toed Lark 36. Horned Lark 37.Himalayan Bulbul 38.Mountain Chiffchaff 39.Hume's Leaf Warbler 40.Hume's Whitethroat 41.Jungle Babbler 42.Streaked Laughingthrush 43.Wallcreeper 44.Jungle Myna 45.Common Myna 46.Rosy Starling 47.Bluethroat 48.White-capped Redstart 49.Black Redstart 50.Guldenstadt's Redstart 51.Common Stonechat 52.Desert Wheatear 53.House Sparrow 54.Tibetan Snowfinch 55.Robin Accentor 56.Yellow Wagtail 57.Citrine Wagtail 58.Forest Wagtail 59.Grey Wagtail 60.White Wagtail 61.Tree Pipit 62.Yellow-breasted Greenfinch 63.European Goldfinch 64.Twite 65.Brandt's Mountain Finch 66.Common Rosefinch 67.Great Rosefinch 68.Red-fronted Serin Mammal checklist (as per the Field Guide To Indian Mammals): 1. Bharal or Blue Sheep 2. Himalayan Marmot 3. Kiyang 4. Ladakh Pika 5. Large Eared Pika 6. Pale or Mountain Weasel 7. Stoliczka's-Mountain-Vole 8. Yak 9. Himalayan Stoat
  • Title
    Diversity and management of wild mammals in tea gardens in the rainforest regions of the Western Ghats, India: A case study from a tea estate in the Anaimalai Hills
    Type
    Report
    Description
    In many places in the Western Ghats hill ranges ofsouthern India, rainforest has been clear-felled in orderto grow tea plantations. Such plantations now exist as islands of agriculture surrounded by forest tracts, most of which are protected as wildlife sanctuaries. Wereport a case study from one such tea garden. We observed a diversity of wild mammals, both herbivores and carnivores, usingopen grass patches, swamps andvegetation along streams in the tea gar den. Largemammals were observed to forage in such areas andreturn to the adjoining forests. Small mammals wereeither resident or used stream vegetation as a corridor to move from oneside of the forest to the opposite side. Dhole (Cuon alpinus) often preyed on sambar (Cervus unicolor) and even denned twice in the estate. We also observed a minimal human–animal conflict in the area. Problems such as stealing of meat from sambar killsmade by dhole, could be overcome by awareness. We propose that such areas can be effectively managedsuch that it could facilitate movement of wild mammals with least damage to the commercial activity related to tea. Such a wildlife management strategy canbecome a model that could be followed in tea-growing areas throughout the Western Ghats.
    Attribution
    H. N. Kumara, M. Ananda Kumar, A. K. Sharma, H. S. Sushma, Mridula Singh and Mewa Singh