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2 documents found tagged mehao wildlife sanctuary [X]
  • Title
    The day range and home range of the Eastern Hoolock Gibbon Hoolock leuconedys (Mammalia: Primates: Hylobatidae) in Lower Dibang Valley District in Arunachal Pradesh, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    This paper presents the findings of a study conducted on the Eastern Hoolock Gibbon Hoolock leuconedys in Mehao Wildlife Sanctuary and outside to the south of the park, Arunachal Pradesh, India investigating the daily path length (DPL) and home range used by the species in two forest areas with different disturbance gradients.  The four habituated groups of H. leuconedys in fragmented and contiguous forest areas, two groups in each of the forest types, showed considerable variation in their DPL ranging from 6.59m to 1019.01m with a mean distance of 192.75m (SE = ±26.48) in 73 full day observations.  Although the mean DPL was recorded with very little variation across the seasons in both the forest types, it was significantly different from fragmented forest.  Similarly, the home range size also varied among the groups and was estimated as the maximum for Group D (24.62ha) followed by Group E (16.28ha) in contiguous forest and Group B (2.49ha) and Group A (1.09ha) in fragmented forest.  Also, there was a distinct seasonal pattern of home range used by all the study groups with largest seasonal home range in monsoon  and pre-monsoon season in fragmented and contiguous forest respectively.  The DPL and home range of H. leuconedys in Arunachal Pradesh has been highly affected by forest fragmentation and/or canopy discontinuity which makes the species vulnerable to hunting, predation by feral dogs and hawks and ultimately local extinction.  Thus, the findings of the present research evoke the question of long term survival of the species in fragmented forests. 
    Attribution
    Sarma Kuladip, Kumar Awadhesh; Journal of Threatened Taxa Vol 8, No 4 (2016) 26/4/2016; pp. 8641-8651; 10.11609/jott.2739.8.4.8641-8651
  • Title
    A preliminary study on the activity budget of post released Eastern Hoolock Gibbon Hoolock leuconedys (Mammalia: Primates: Hylobatidae) in Mehao Wildlife Sanctuary, Arunachal Pradesh, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    The Wildlife Trust of India has taken a long term responsibility to identify a suitable habitat for the threatened families of Eastern Hoolock Gibbon from a village called Dello in Arunachal Pradesh to a nearby forested area which was the earlier home of this species. There is an ongoing successful rescue and translocation programme since November, 2011 in which four Eastern Hoolock Gibbon families comprising 11 individuals were translocated in three different habitat types in and around the forested area of the Mehao Wildlife Sanctuary.  Post-release monitoring is an obvious and required technique to study the rescued families of Eastern Hoolock Gibbons after translocation to confirm their post-release survival and better livelihood.  The regular monitoring of the activity patterns has helped to understand the habitat utilization and resource use in the newly released sites. Along with the rescue operation, there is an additional task to find out the potential habitats to define as ideal release sites for gibbons.  The post release monitoring was studied through the instantaneous scan sampling method to collect the information mostly about their activity patterns.  The present study describes the overall activity patterns and resource use in the released gibbons on the basis of utilization of different habitat types.  It was observed that the ranging pattern was mostly influenced by the resource availability and forest type.  The gibbon family released in the denser forest habitat developed a general food habit whereas the family from the thinner forest area became the specialist consumer.  However, further detailed study with sufficient data is required to comment on their general ecology.  
    Attribution
    Roy Kuladeep, Nautiyal Himani, Dasgupta Soumya (2015). Journal of Threatened Taxa 12(7) pp. 7862-7869; doi:10.11609/jott.2376.7862-7869