A clean list of Odonata names have been uploaded on IBP based on Subramanian, K.A. and Babu, R. (2017). Checklist of Odonata (Insecta) of India. Version 3.0.

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9 documents found tagged molecular phylogeny [X]
  • Title
    Sphaerotheca pashchima, a new species of burrowing frog (Anura: Dicroglossidae) from western India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Sphaerotheca pashchima, a new species of burrowing frog, is described from western India. It can be diagnosed from all its congeners based on a combination of characters including interorbital width less than upper eyelid width, snout to nostril distance less than half of eye diameter, nostril nearer to snout than to eye, internarial distance greater than inter orbital distance, snout rounded, dorsum rough and warty, finger 2 length equal to or less than finger 4 length, finger 1 less finger 3 length, outer metatarsal tubercle absent, tibio tarsal tubercle absent, length of inner metatarsal tubercle more than three times the inner toe length and reduced webbing. We also provide 16S rRNA gene sequence for S. pashchima sp. nov. and show that it is genetically distinct from species of Sphaerotheca for which genetic data is available.
    Attribution
    Anand Padhye, Neelesh Dahanukar, Shauri Sulakhe, Nikhil Dandekar, Sunil Limaye & Kirti Jamdade, Journal of Threatened Taxa, Vol 9, No 6 (2017); pp. 10286–10296 http://dx.doi.org/10.11609/jott.2877.9.6.10286-10296
  • Title
    Identity of Sphaerotheca pluvialis (Jerdon, 1853) and other available names among the burrowing frogs (Anura: Dicroglossidae) of South Asia
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Species diversity of South Asian burrowing frogs within the genus Sphaerotheca is still obscure because of lack of taxonomic review. There are taxonomic issues within the genus Sphaerotheca with several names being synonymized to S. breviceps and names, such as S. pluvialis, being available without proper diagnosis. To resolve the taxonomic confusion, we describe and diagnose S. pluvialis by designating a neotype from Carnatic region of southern India, from where the original species was described, and make S. fodiens as its objective synonym. We designate lectotype of S. breviceps and provide diagnosis for separating the species from its congeners. We clarify the identity of S. dobsonii and resurrect S. swani and S. maskeyi. Based on morphology we define three groups within genus Sphaerotheca and provide key to the groups and eight valid species in the genus. We assign genetic barcodes to S. pluvialis, S. dobsonii and S. breviceps.
    Attribution
    Neelesh Dahanukar, Shauri Sulakhe & Anand Padhye, Journal of Threatened Taxa, Vol 9, No 6 (2017); pp. 10269–10285 http://dx.doi.org/10.11609/jott.3358.9.6.10269-10285
  • Title
    Cnemaspis flaviventralis, a new species of gecko (Squamata: Gekkonidae) from the Western Ghats of Maharashtra, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Cnemaspis flaviventralis, a new species of day gecko, is described from the forests of Amboli, Sindhudurg District, Maharashtra State, northern Western Ghats, India. The new species was previously confused with the sympatric species Cnemaspis girii, C. indraneildasii, C. kolhapurensis and C. goaensis. It is distinguished from C. giri by having spine-like tubercles on flanks, granular dorsal scales intermixed with large, depressed, slightly keeled scales (vs. lack of spine-like tubercles on flanks, granular dorsal scales, intermixed with large smooth scales); from C. indraneildasii by having dorsal scales heterogeneous (vs. homogenous), lacking a series of enlarged median sub-caudal scales, and 28–29 (vs. 20) ventral scales across mid-body; from C. kolhapurensis by having heterogeneous (vs. homogenous) dorsal scalation, lacking spine-like tubercles on flanks and lacking pre-cloacal pores (vs. 24–28 pre-cloacal-femoral pores); and from C. goaensis by lacking pre-cloacal pores and lacking a series of enlarged median sub-caudal scales. We further provide partial mitochondrial 16S rRNA gene sequences for the new species and for the sympatric species C. girii, C. kolhapurensis and C. goaensis, and show that the new species is genetically distinct.
    Attribution
    Amit Sayyed, Robert Alexander Pyron & Neelesh Dahanukar, Journal of Threatened Taxa, Vol 8, No 14 (2016); pp. 9619-9629 http://dx.doi.org/10.11609/jott.2599.8.14.9619-9629
  • Title
    Leaping frogs (Anura: Ranixalidae) of the Western Ghats of India: An integrated taxonomic review
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Leaping frogs of the family Ranixalidae are endemic to the Western Ghats of India and are currently placed in a single genus, Indirana. Based on specimens collected from their entire range and a comprehensive study of type material defining all known species, we propose a revised taxonomy for the leaping frogs using an integrative approach including an analysis of the mitochondrial 16S rRNA and nuclear rhodopsin genes, as well as multivariate morphometrics. Both genetic and morphological analyses suggest that the genus Indirana is paraphyletic and a distinct monophyletic group, Walkerana gen. nov is described herein. The new genus is separated from Indirana sensu stricto by an apomorphic character state of reduced webbing, with one phalange free on the first and second toe (vs. no free phalanges), two phalanges free on the third and fifth toe (vs. one free phalange), and three phalanges free on the fourth toe (vs. 2–2½ phalanges free). This review includes (i) identification of lectotypes and redescription of three species of the genus Walkerana; (ii) identification of lectotypes for Indirana beddomii and I. semipalmata and their redescription; (iii) redescription of I. brachytarsus and I. gundia; and (iv) descriptions of four new species, namely, I. duboisi and I. tysoni from north of the Palghat gap, and I. yadera and I. sarojamma from south of the Palghat gap; and (iv) a key to the genera and species in the family Ranixalidae.
    Attribution
    Neelesh Dahanukar, Nikhil Modak, Keerthi Krutha, P.O. Nameer, Anand D. Padhye & Sanjay Molur, Journal of Threatened Taxa, Vol 8, No 10 (2016); pp. 9221–9288 http://dx.doi.org/10.11609/jott.2532.8.10.9221-9288
  • Title
    Indirana salelkari, a new species of leaping frog (Anura: Ranixalidae) from Western Ghats of Goa, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Indirana salelkari, a new species of leaping frog, is described from Netravali, Goa, India.  The species can be distinguished from its congeners by a combination of morphological characters, viz., head longer than wide, narrow and deep buccal cavity, vomerine teeth large and acutely placed close to each other, oval choanae, distinct canthus rostralis, first finger longer than or equal to second, presence of double outer palmer tubercles, elongated inner metatarsal tubercle, moderate webbing, discs of fingers and toes with crescentic deep marginal grooves restricted only to the anterior side of the discs, dorsal skin with glandular folds but without warts, ventral skin granular with some mottling on throat and, palms and soles dark brown.  Indirana salelkari differs from its sister taxa, I. chiravasi, in the placement and structure of vomerine teeth and choanae.  The new species is genetically distinct from I. chiravasi, with a genetic distance of 3.8% for the 16S rRNA gene.  We also provide phylogentic placement of Indirana salelkari based on mitochondrial 12S and 16S ribosomal genes and nuclear rhodopsin gene along with molecular clock analysis, which further confirms its genetic distinctness from other related taxa.  
    Attribution
    Modak Nikhil, Dahanukar Neelesh, Gosavi Ninad, Padhye Anand D. (2015). Journal of Threatened Taxa 9(7) pp. 7493-7509; doi:10.11609/jott.2175.7493-7509
  • Title
    Indirana chiravasi, a new species of Leaping Frog (Anura: Ranixalidae) from Western Ghats of India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Indirana chiravasi, a new species of leaping frog is described from the northern Western Ghats around Amboli, Sindhudurg District, Maharashtra, India. It differs from all its congeners based on a combination of characters including presence of median single internal vocal sac, head longer than wide, distinct canthus rostralis, tympanum 2/3rd to 3/4th the diameter of eye, vomerine teeth in two oblique series at the posterior border of choanae, long midventral lingual papilla, first finger longer than or equal to second, presence of double outer palmer tubercle, thin and elongated inner metatarsal tubercle, absence of outer metatarsal tubercle, webbing moderate, dorsal skin with glandular folds but without warts, ventral skin smooth without mottling and palms and soles dark brown. Molecular analysis based on mitochondrial 12S and 16S genes and nuclear rhodopsin and rag1 genes suggests that the species is genetically distinct from other species for which genetic data is available. Preliminary observations on the development of the species are also provided. We also provide genetic data and images for Indirana gundia collected from the type locality.
    Attribution
    Padhye A.D., Modak N., Dahanukar N. (2014). Journal of Threatened Taxa 10(6) pp. 6293-6312; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o4068.6293-312
  • Title
    Raorchestes ghatei, a new species of shrub frog (Anura: Rhacophoridae) from the Western Ghats of Maharashtra, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    A new species of shrub frog Raorchestes ghatei is described from the Western Ghats of Maharashtra. The species differs from its congeners based on a combination of characters including small to medium-sized adult males, snout mucronate in dorsal view, canthus rostralis angular and sharp, snout slightly projecting beyond mouth ventrally, tympanum indistinct and one third of the eye diameter, tongue without papilla but with a lingual pit, nuptial pad rudimentary to absent, a bony tubercle on humerus at the end of deltoid ridge present in males and absent in females, skin finely granulated or smooth dorsally, lateral side marbled with white blotches on brown to black background. Molecular phylogeny based on 16S rRNA gene sequence suggests that the new species is genetically distinct and forms a monophyletic clade within Raorchestes. The species exhibits sexual dimorphism with males having single sub-gular vocal sac and a tubercle on the humerus while females lack them. The species shows direct development. The species is widely distributed in the Western Ghats of Maharashtra.
    Attribution
    Padhye A.D., Sayyed A., Jadhav A., Dahanukar N. (2013). Journal of Threatened Taxa 15(5) pp. 4913-4931; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o3702.4913-31
  • Title
    CEPF Western Ghats Special Series: Rediscovery of the threatened Western Ghats endemic sisorid catfish Glyptothorax poonaensis (Teleostei: Siluriformes: Sisoridae)
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Glyptothorax poonaensis Hora is an endemic sisorid catfish of the Western Ghats of India known only from its type locality in Mula-Mutha River, a tributary of Bhima River, at Pune. This fish has not been recorded from its type locality for more than 70 years and it was thought to be extinct. Here we report a recently discovered population of G. poonaensis from Indrayani River, a tributary of Bhima River. Based on 11 specimens, we have redescribed this species along with some comments on its taxonomy, length-weight relationship, feeding and breeding habits. We also performed molecular phylogeny of the fish by sequencing three mitochondrial genes encoding 16S ribosomal DNA, cytochrome b and cytochrome oxidase subunit I. Molecular analysis suggests that G. poonaensis is nested within a lineage of Glyptothorax species from northern and northeastern India and China. Further, our analysis reveals that southern Indian species of Glyptothorax do not form a monophyletic group. Molecular dating of divergence times indicates that G. poonaensis diverged from other northern Indian species 1.9 to 2.5 million years ago. Current knowledge suggests that the species could be found in two river basins with total extent of around 6100km2; however, the species is already suspected to be locally extinct from half of its known extent of occurrence. Furthermore, the habitat of the species may be threatened by increasing pollution, deforestation leading to siltation, halting of flow by damming, sandmining and introduced fish species. In the light of biodiversity conservation, especially in an important biodiversity hotspot like Western Ghats, such rare and endemic species needs prioritization.
    Attribution
    Dahanukar N., Diwekar M., Paingankar M. (2011). Journal of Threatened Taxa 7(3) pp. 1885-1898; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o2663.1885-98
  • Title
    Emerging trends in molecular systematics and molecular phylogeny of mayflies (Insecta: Ephemeroptera)
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Current trends are reviewed in the molecular systematics and phylogeny of the Ephemeroptera (mayflies), an ancient monophyletic lineage of pterygote insects. Theories of mayfly origins are analyzed, followed by a discussion of higher classification schemes in light of recent developments in molecular systematics. Ephemeroptera evolution is a classic example of ancient rapid radiation, presenting challenges for phylogenetic analysis. The utility of combined studies of morphological and molecular data is substantiated with examples and the role of molecular systematics in unraveling the taxonomy of cryptic species complexes is highlighted. The importance of DNA barcoding in mayfly taxonomy is discussed in the light of recent progress, and future contributions of genetics to the study of taxonomy, ecology and evolution in mayflies are discussed.
    Attribution
    Sivaramakrishnan K.G., Subramanian K.A., Arunachalam M., Kumar C.S., Sundar S. (2011). Journal of Threatened Taxa 8(3) pp. 1975-1980; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o2661.1975-80