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3 documents found tagged monsoon [X]
  • Title
    Diversity and seasonality of polypore fungi in the moist deciduous forests of Peechi-Vazhani Wildlife Sanctuary, Kerala, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    The objective of present study was to understand the diversity, distribution and seasonality of polypore fungi in the moist deciduous forests of Peechi-Vazhani Wildlife Sanctuary in three different seasons. Results obtained showed that density and frequency of occurrence have been varied significantly during different seasons and the community structure and species composition during monsoon and post monsoon seasons were distinct from pre-monsoon season. Fomitopsis feei with higher abundance values dominated the moist deciduous forests during monsoon season (17.72) and post-monsoon season (13.79). During pre-monsoon season, Daedalea flavida was the dominant species with abundance value of 10.93. The above fungi were predominant during all the seasons due to their high ecological amplitude. Fungal diversity analysis showed that species richness was higher during monsoon season and revealed the influence of seasonal variation on fungal diversity. The high species similarity was observed between monsoon and post monsoon season compared to pre-monsoon and monsoon.
    Attribution
    A. Muhammed Iqbal, Kattany Vidyasagaran & P. Narayan Ganesh, Journal of Threatened Taxa, Vol 8, No 12 (2016); pp. 9434–9442 http://dx.doi.org/10.11609/jott.2567.8.12.9434-9442
  • Title
    Seasonal diversity of butterflies and their larval food plants in the surroundings of upper Neora Valley National Park, a sub-tropical broad leaved hill forest in the eastern Himalayan landscape, West Bengal, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Seasonal butterfly diversity in the adjacent areas of the upper Neora Valley National Park, a part of the Himalayan landscape, was studied. The available larval host plant resources present within, as well as in the adjoining areas of transect were identified. A total of 4163 butterflies representing 161 species belonging to five families were recorded during this study. One-hundred-and-forty-three species of plants belonging to 44 families served as the larval food plants of butterflies. The maximum number of butterfly species and maximum number of individuals were sampled during the monsoons. The monsoons with least skewed rank abundance curve of species distribution, was also marked by maximum species diversity and maximum species evenness. This was probably due to the abundant distribution of luxurious vegetation that served as food plants for the larval stages of butterflies. Nymphalidae was the most dominant family with 43.48% of the total number of species. Autumn followed by the monsoon was associated with high species richness probably due to the abundance of vegetation that provides foliage to its larval stages.
    Attribution
    Sengupta P., Banerjee K.K., Ghorai N. (2014). Journal of Threatened Taxa 1(6) pp. 5327-5342; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o3446.5327-42
  • Title
    Seasonal variation of Hemiptera community of a temple pond of Cachar District, Assam, northeastern India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    The study records seven families, 11 genera and 14 species of hemipteran insect community in different seasons in a temple pond near Silchar, Cachar District, Assam, northeastern India. The pond is very rich in macrophytes like Nelumbo nucifera (Water Lotus), Hygrorhiza aristata (Indian Lotus), Cynodon dactylon (Bermuda Grass), Philotria sp. etc. The hemipteran families recorded in the system were Corixidae, Gerridae, Aphididae, Mesoveliidae, Notonectidae, Nepidae and Belostomatidae. The species were Micronecta haliploides, Micronecta (Basileonecta) scutellaris scutellaris (Stål) (Corixidae); Neogerris parvula (Stål), Limnogonus nitidus (Mayr), Tenagogerris sp., Rhagadotarsus sp. (Gerridae); Enithares ciliata (Fabricius), Anisops lundbladiana Landsbury, (Notonectidae); Diplonychus rusticus (Fabricius) and Diplonychus annulatus (Fabricius) (Belostomatidae), Rhopalosiphum nymphaeae (Linnaeus) (Aphididae), Ranatra elongata (Fabricius), Ranatra varipes varipes (Stål) (Nepidae) and Mesovelia vittigera Horváth (Mesoveliidae). The highest population of Hemiptera was recorded during the post-monsoon followed by the pre-monsoon and the monsoon periods. The lowest was recorded in the winter. Shannon Weiner diversity index (H/) and evenness index (J/) showed the highest diversity and evenness during the post monsoon period. Berger Parker index of dominance (d) was found highest in winter. In winter both diversity and density were the lowest. The study revealed the presence of four dominant species and three sub-dominant species in the pond. Insect diversity did not show any significant relationship with the environmental variables.
    Attribution
    Das K., Gupta S. (2012). Journal of Threatened Taxa 11(4) pp. 3050-3058; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o2724.3050-8