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2 documents found tagged northeast india [X]
  • Title
    Forest ghost moth fauna of northeastern India (Lepidoptera: Hepialidae: Endoclita, Palpifer, and Hepialiscus
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Taxonomic and biological information is reviewed for the forest Hepialidae of northeastern India, a poorly known group of moths in a region known for the global significance of its biodiversity. The taxonomic and biological characteriscs are described for genera known from the northeast - Endoclita, Palpifer, and Hepialiscus. A key is provided for distinguishing these genera and the genus Thitarodes known from nearby Bhutan, China, and Nepal, which is almost certainly present within the borders of India. Taxonomic characteristics are described for 12 species from the northeast along with illustrations of the species and maps of their known distributions. Information on species distributions is extremely fragmentary and it is considered very likely that most species have more extensive distributions than currently documented. The northeastern Indian region represents a center of hepialid diversity comprising three principal distribu on patterns: (i) local endemics, (ii) Himalayan, and (iii) northeastern. Comparison of distribution records and major vegetation types indicate the absence of information on the hepialid fauna for much of the northeast region. The principal challenge for future documentation and assessment of the hepialid fauna for this region, as with any other part of India, is the lack of modern descriptions of type specimens. The inclusion of voucher collections of Hepialidae in future biodiversity surveys of northeastern India is to be strongly encouraged, particularly in the context of current and future environmental impacts affecting the sustainability of forest environments in the region.
  • Title
    Eaglenest Wildlife Sanctuary flowers 2014
    Type
    Presentation
    Description
    Eaglenest or Eagle's Nest Wildlife Sanctuaryis aprotected area of Indiain theHimalayan foothillsofWest Kameng District,Arunachal Pradesh. It conjoinsSessa Orchid Sanctuaryto the northeast andPakhui Tiger Reserveacross theKameng riverto the east. Altitude ranges extremely from 500 metres (1,640ft) to 3,250 metres (10,663ft). See:Map 1,Topo mapIt is a part of theKameng Elephant Reserve. Eaglenest is notable as a primebirdingsite due to the extraordinary variety, numbers and accessibility of bird species there. Eaglenest derives its name fromRed Eagle Divisionof theIndian armywhich was posted in the area in the 1950s. Eaglenest is part of the Kameng protected area complex (KPAC), the largest contiguous closed-canopy forest tract of Arunachal Pradesh, which includes Eaglenest, Pakke, Sessa, Nameri, and Sonai Rupai sanctuaries and associated reserved forest blocks. The complex covers 3500km² in area and ranges from 100 metres (328ft) to 3,300 metres (10,827ft) in altitude. Eaglenest is within theConservation InternationalHimalayaBiodiversity Hotspotarea. As a camper I visited this sanctuary organised by Insearch along with other 20 nature enthusiasts, during April 2014. I was there for two nights and one day. We were guided by Rohan Pandit who was working on altitudinal migration of birds under Ramana Atreya. That day, it was foggy and misty. So, we could not see insects - butterflies. We could hardly see birds. However, I was happy to see flowers which are unique to this land and altitude and season. It was spring and was very cold for me. The whole experience was unforgettable.