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7 documents found tagged nymphalidae [X]
  • Title
    Butterflies of the Rice Research Station and adjoining locality in Chinsurah, West Bengal, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Chinsurah is a small town on the western bank of the Hugli River, a distributary of the river Ganges. A survey from November 2006 to June 2014 with photographic documentation on the butterfly community in Chinsurah revealed the presence of a total of 70 species representing 53 genera in five families; most dominant family was the Nymphalidae having 34.3% of the total species. Six species are legally protected; one species under Schedule I; three species under Schedule II; and two species under Schedule IV of the Indian Wildlife (Protection) Act, 1972. Rare species like Pareronia avator (Moore), Mahathala ameria (Hewitson) and Melanitis zitenius (Herbst) were recorded in this rapidly degrading habitat. This study may help in planning conservation strategies in urban areas and sustainable development as well.
    Attribution
    Somnath Mandal, Journal of Threatened Taxa, Vol 8, No 5 (2016); pp. 8804–8813 http://dx.doi.org/10.11609/jott.2815.8.5.8804-8813
  • Title
    A case study of butterfly road kills from Anaikatty Hills, Western Ghats, Tamil Nadu, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
     Anaikatty Hills of the Western Ghats in Tamil Nadu witness the annual spectacle of mass movement of lakhs of butterflies.  The present paper examines the impact of vehicular traffic on this ‘butterfly migration’ through a survey of butterfly mortality along a road stretch in Anaikatty Hills.  A high rate of mortality due to road traffic was observed during the mass movement of butterflies.  One-hundred-and-thirty-five butterfly road kills belonging to three families, nine genera and 12 species were recorded during the study.  The proportion of nymphalid butterflies among the road kills (70%) was very high compared to their respective share in the background population (39%), indicating a higher road mortality risk for nymphalids.  The conservation significance of the road traffic impact on butterfly assemblage and management options are discussed. 
    Attribution
    Sony R. K., Arun P. R. (2015). Journal of Threatened Taxa 14(7) pp. 8154-8158; doi:10.11609/jott.1743.7.14.8154-8158
  • Title
    Seasonal diversity of butterflies and their larval food plants in the surroundings of upper Neora Valley National Park, a sub-tropical broad leaved hill forest in the eastern Himalayan landscape, West Bengal, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Seasonal butterfly diversity in the adjacent areas of the upper Neora Valley National Park, a part of the Himalayan landscape, was studied. The available larval host plant resources present within, as well as in the adjoining areas of transect were identified. A total of 4163 butterflies representing 161 species belonging to five families were recorded during this study. One-hundred-and-forty-three species of plants belonging to 44 families served as the larval food plants of butterflies. The maximum number of butterfly species and maximum number of individuals were sampled during the monsoons. The monsoons with least skewed rank abundance curve of species distribution, was also marked by maximum species diversity and maximum species evenness. This was probably due to the abundant distribution of luxurious vegetation that served as food plants for the larval stages of butterflies. Nymphalidae was the most dominant family with 43.48% of the total number of species. Autumn followed by the monsoon was associated with high species richness probably due to the abundance of vegetation that provides foliage to its larval stages.
    Attribution
    Sengupta P., Banerjee K.K., Ghorai N. (2014). Journal of Threatened Taxa 1(6) pp. 5327-5342; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o3446.5327-42
  • Title
    Butterflies of Kerala Agricultural University (KAU) campus, Thrissur, Kerala, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    The present study was conducted to understand the species richness of butterflies in the Kerala Agricultural University main campus. The area lies between 10032 -10033 N and 76016-76017 E and is located very close to the Peechi-Vazhani Wildlife Sanctuary. A total of 139 species in six families were recorded from the campus. Family Nymphalidae dominated with 44 species followed by Lycaenidae (35), Hesperiidae (34), Pieridae (13), Papilionidae (12) and Riodinidae (1)
    Attribution
    Aneesh K.S., Adarsh C.K., Nameer P.O. (2013). Journal of Threatened Taxa 9(5) pp. 4422-4440; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o2870.4422-40
  • Title
    Rediscovery of the Empress, Sasakia funebris Leech (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae: Nymphalinae: Apaturini) after 88 years in India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    The sighting of an Empress, Sasakia funebris, is reported from upper Debang Valley District, Arunachal Pradesh. This is the first record of this butterfly after almost nine decades in India. Observations on the habitat and habits of the species are given.
    Attribution
    Singh A.P. (2013). Journal of Threatened Taxa 10(5) pp. 4514-4516; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o3428.4514-6
  • Title
    Ypthima kedarnathensis Singh, 2007 (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae: Satyrinae) from the Kumaon Himalaya, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Ypthima kedarnathensis A.P. Singh is reported from near the Gagar Pass, Nainital District, Kumaon Himalaya, Uttarakhand, India.
    Attribution
    Smetacek P. (2010). Journal of Threatened Taxa 13(2) pp. 1390-1391; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o2574.1390-1
  • Title
    Occurrence of Elymnias obnubila Marshall and de Nicéville, 1883 (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae: Satyrinae) in southern Mizoram: Range extension of the species and an addition to the Indian butterfly fauna
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    This paper describes a recent sighting of the Chestnut Palmfly Butterfly, Elymnias obnubila Marshall & de Nicéville, 1883 (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae: Satyrinae) from Ngenpui Wildlife Sanctuary in southern Mizoram. It represents a range extension of the species by 1,500km north of its previously known range in southern Myanmar and Thailand, and an addition to the Indian butterfly fauna.
    Attribution
    Kunte K. (2009). Journal of Threatened Taxa 11(1) pp. 567-568; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o2279.567-8