Leading up to the National Moth Week on July 22, we interview some contributors of moth observations.Listen to the first podcast episode with Nagesh O. S. on the IBP blog.

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4 documents found tagged peninsular india [X]
  • Title
    Endemic orchids of peninsular India: a review
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    The present analysis of endemic orchids shows a total account of 130 species belonging to 38 genera in peninsular India. Of these, 43 are terrestrial, 85 epiphytic and two holomycotrophic (saprophytic). The Western Ghats comprises of 123 endemic orchid species, Deccan Plateau has 29 endemic orchid species and Eastern Ghats has 22 endemic orchid species. However, in the present analysis the number of endemic species is reduced from the earlier reports because of the rapid development in the taxonomic explorations in the neighboring countries. As a result, many species were found to show extended distribution.
    Attribution
    Jalal J.S., Jayanthi J. (2012). Journal of Threatened Taxa 15(4) pp. 3415-3425; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o3091.3415-25
  • Title
    Natural range extension, sampling artifact, or human mediated translocations? Range limits of Northern type Semnopithecus entellus (Dufresne, 1797) (Primates: Cercopithecidae: Colobinae) in peninsular India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    The Semnopithecus entellus can be broadly classified into two morphotypes based on tail carriage, namely the northern and the southern types (NT & ST). The borderline between these morphotypes runs along the Tapti-Godavari rivers in peninsular India. However there have been anecdotal reports of range extension of NT in peninsular India. To investigate this scenario we undertook an intensive survey of S. entellus morphotypes along the borderline districts in the states of Gujarat, Maharashtra, Karnataka and Andhra Pradesh. The GPS coordinates of the two morphotypes were mapped using MapInfo professional software and the resulting map was compared with the map generated by Roonwal. Results indicate that NT S. entellus range limit fall further south of Roonwal’s borderline. This incongruence in NTs distribution between the present study and Roonwal’s might be due to natural range extension of NTs in some areas or a product of sampling artifact. Furthermore in parts of Andhra Pradesh and Karnataka human mediated translocations might have also contributed to this range extension.
    Attribution
    Nag K.S.C., Padmanabhan P., Karanth K.P. (2011). Journal of Threatened Taxa 8(3) pp. 2028-2032; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o2740.2028-32
  • Title
    Metropolitan garbage dumps: possible winter migratory raptor monitoring stations in peninsular India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Winter raptor migration and movement is poorly documented for peninsular India, mainly due to the lack of geographical bottlenecks. We describe, for the first time, the use of a garbage dump in a metropolitan city as an alternative visual winter raptor monitoring station. The daily count, adult to juvenile ratios and species composition of three migratory raptor species, Steppe Eagle Aquila nipalensis, Black-eared Kite Milvus migrans lineatus and Tawny Eagle Aquila rapax are presented. Ground temperatures at the garbage dump site and surrounding area, and the wing beat rate of migratory raptors before and after arrival in the early morning were measured. A total of 355 raptors migrating over a period of six observation days with 250 adults and 105 juveniles were recorded. The temperature of the garbage dump was significantly higher than the surrounding area, while the wing flapping rate was significantly lower over the garbage dump area. It is possible that migrating raptors use garbage dump thermals in the early morning to save energy with soaring and gliding flight (versus flapping flight). We propose that such sites may be used as visual winter migration monitoring stations in metropolitan cities in peninsular India.
    Attribution
    Pande S., Pawashe A., Sant N., Mahabal A., Dahanukar N. (2010). Journal of Threatened Taxa 10(2) pp. 1214-1218; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o2403.1214-8
  • Title
    Nemacheilus stigmofasciatus, a new species of nemacheiline loach (Cypriniformes: Balitoridae) from the Western Ghats, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    A new nemacheiline loach is described from the Seethanathi river of the Western Ghats, Karnataka. The new species differs from others of the genus in having an incomplete lateral line extending up to the end of the pelvic fin, shorter snout (35.9 -39.4% of HL) and bigger eyes (28.1-31.3% of HL). Notable colour variation is present in the bands on the back (11-13) and blotches (6-8) evenly spaced along the lateral line.
    Attribution
    Arunachalam M., Muralidharan M. (2009). Journal of Threatened Taxa 3(1) pp. 147-150; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o1942.147-50