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2 documents found tagged pesticides [X]
  • Title
    Comparison of insect biodiversity between organic and conventional plantations in Kodagu, Karnataka, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    We undertook a comparative analysis of ground insects and fruit eating butterflies on 29 different plantations in Kodagu District of Karnataka which is one of the rich biodiversity zones of the Western Ghats. These included organic and conventional coffee and cardamom plantations using different levels of chemical fertilizers and pesticides. A total number of 457 ground insect species were collected using pit-fall traps which included 92 species of ants and 123 species of beetles, among other insect taxa that we measured. Similarly, 25 species of butterflies belonging to the family Nymphalidae were collected using bait traps. We found a clear negative effect on the ground insect species diversity (Shannon index) and evenness (Shannon evenness index) in pesticide treated plantations as compared to the organic plantations. A similar negative effect was observed for butterfly diversity in plantations using pesticides. Our results corroborate the value of organic plantations in supporting higher levels of biodiversity.
    Attribution
    Mone S., Kusha K.M., Jathanna D., Ali M., Goel A. (2014). Journal of Threatened Taxa 9(6) pp. 6186-6194; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o3778.6186-94
  • Title
    CEPF Western Ghats Special Series : Amphibian communities in three different coffee plantation regimes in the Western Ghats, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    In the highly populated and diverse tropics, conservation in relatively pristine habitats is important but clearly inadequate for sustaining the earth biological diversity. Agro-forestry systems such as shade-coffee plantations that incorporate arboreal vegetation are known to be more resilient for biodiversity conservation than other more drastic land transformations. We evaluated amphibian richness and diversity in 15 coffee plantations from three different regimes; organic coffee plantations, NPK coffee plantations and pesticide use coffee plantations in Kodagu District, Western Ghats, India. We treated five sacred groves as control region (CR) and sampled them using a combination of standardized visual and acoustic transect sampling. The sacred groves that were characterized by natural vegetation showed the highest richness and abundance of amphibians among the four regimes. In organic coffee plantations, overall abundance and richness of amphibians was significantly higher compared to NPK coffee plantations. On the other hand, amphibian richness and diversity in pesticide use coffee plantations were significantly lower compared to all other regimes. The results of the study clearly indicated that, the difference in habitat variables in coffee plantations and use of different treatments for pest control had a significant effect on the species richness and abundance of amphibians. This study highlights the great potential of sacred groves and organic coffee plantations as complementary habitat for the conservation of amphibians.
    Attribution
    Rathod S., Rathod P. (2013). Journal of Threatened Taxa 9(5) pp. 4404-4413; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o3054.4404-13