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4 documents found tagged phytoplankton [X]
  • Title
    The seasonal occurrence of the Whale Shark Rhincodon typus (Smith, 1828) (Orectolobiformes: Rhincodontidae) along the Odisha coast, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    This article gives a description about the seasonal occurrence of Whale Shark in the southern Odisha coast by taking into account of the current observed data and published literatures. The present report claims the sighting of whale sharks during offshore surveys on 13th March 2016 and 15th March 2016, 8 km (19° 15’ 38” N, 85° 01’32” E) and 4.5 km (19º 15’ 69” N, 85° 00’ 58” E) off the coast of Gopalpur Port, Odisha respectively. Most of the earlier reports of whale shark sightings along Odisha coast are from the coastal waters off Rushikulya river mouth or Gopalpur during the month of February-March. Continuous records of whale sharks along southern Odisha coast during February and March suggest the probability of seasonal migration of this giant fish during the period.
    Attribution
    Shesdev Patro, Biraja Kumar Sahu, Chandanlal Parida, Madhusmita Dash & K.C. Sahu, Journal of Threatened Taxa, Vol 9, No 4 (2017); pp. 10125–10129 http://doi.org/10.11609/jott.3165.9.4.10125-10129
  • Title
    Dinoflagellate Ceratium symmetricum Pavillard (Gonyaulacales: Ceratiaceae): Its occurrence in the Hooghly-Matla Estuary and offshore of Indian Sundarban and its significance
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    The Sundarban is the largest mangrove ecosystem, which is presently vulnerable to climate change related impacts. The western part of it falls in the state of West Bengal between the estuaries of the Hooghly and Ichamati-Raymongal Rivers. The diversity of the genus Ceratium Schrank and the related physicochemical parameters such as Sea Surface Temperature (SST) was studied in the Hooghly-Matla estuary and offshore. Five species of bio-indicator dinoflagellate, Ceratium were identified in the bloom-forming season. The species are: C. furca, C. fusus, C. symmetricum, C. trichoceros and C. tripos. C. symmetricum was not previously reported from the Indian part of the Sundarban and is now found in low abundance. The other four species are less sensitive to warming or rise in SST. A comparative study of the day time SST from the satellite images of the year 2003 to 2009 of the months of January and February reveals a rising winter SST. Compared to the previous years, the increase in temperature can be one of the causative factors to explain the lower abundance of C. symmetricum compared to the others. With further rise of the SST, there is a possibility that this species may no longer be found in abundance in the western part of adjoining Hooghly-Matla estuarine system.
    Attribution
    Akhand A., Maity S., Mukhopadhyay A., Das I., Sanyal P., Hazra S. (2012). Journal of Threatened Taxa 7(4) pp. 2693-2698; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o2530.2693-8
  • Title
    Phytoplankton diversity of two floodplain lakes (pats) of Manipur, northeastern India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Phytoplankton communities of Utra and Waithou pats (floodplain lakes) of Manipur, studied during November 2002 - October 2004, revealed 62 and 61 species, and indicated monthly richness between 27-45 (38 � plus or minus 4) and 32-46 (39 � plus or minus 4) species respectively with distinct qualitative importance of Chlorophyta (29 � plus or minus 4 and 28 � plus or minus 3 species). Phytoplankton (154 � plus or minus 31 n/l and 164 � plus or minus 34 n/l) comprised between 43.8 � plus or minus 3.0 % and 41.5 � plus or minus 3.0 % of net plankton abundance respectively of these two lakes. Chlorophyta (115 � plus or minus 23 n/l and 113 � plus or minus 21 n/l), the dominant quantitative component (74.4 � plus or minus 4.1% and 67.5 � plus or minus 4.8%), indicated importance of the demids. Bacillariophyta (33 � plus or minus 9 n/l and 37 � plus or minus 12 n/l) formed sub-dominant group, and Dinophyta > Euglenophyta > Chrysophyta showed very low densities. Various abiotic factors registered relatively limited influence on richness and abundance of phytoplankton as well as on abundance of individual groups in Utra Pat than in Waithou Pat. Multiple regression depicted higher cumulative influence of fifteen abiotic factors on the stated biotic parameters in these pats. Both richness and abundance of Phytoplankton recorded significant monthly variations, showed insignificant temporal variations between two lakes and followed indefinite annual patterns in each pat. Phytoplankton communities of the sampled pats are characterized by higher species diversity, higher evenness and lower dominance.
    Attribution
    Sharma B.K. (2010). Journal of Threatened Taxa 11(2) pp. 1273-1281; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o2427.1273-81
  • Title
    Composition, abundance and ecology of phytoplankton communities of Loktak Lake, Manipur, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Phytoplankton communities of Loktak Lake (a Ramsar site), studied during November 2002-October 2004, reveal the occurrence of 75 and 71 species, indicate monthly richness ranging between 47� plus or minus 6 and 49� plus or minus 3 species and record 50.0-83.2 and 64.5-84.0 % community similarities during two annual cycles respectively. Chlorophyta (33� plus or minus 5 and 35� plus or minus 5 species) show qualitative dominance and importance of Closterium > Cosmarium > Staurastrum > Micrasterias > Gonatozygon species. Phytoplankton (206� plus or minus 58 and 220� plus or minus 53 n/l) comprise between 45.1� plus or minus 6.5 and 42.9� plus or minus 5.8 % of net plankton abundance, indicate trimodal annual patterns and record peak abundance during winter. Chlorophyta (111� plus or minus 20 and 119� plus or minus 15 n/l), the dominant quantitative component, indicate winter peaks; Closterium > Staurastrum > Gonatozygon > Micrasterias species contribute significantly to their abundance. Ceratium hirudinella (43� plus or minus 52 and 39� plus or minus 37 n/l) is the sole important individual species of phytoplankton. Dinophyta > Bacillariophyta are sub-dominant groups and Euglenophyta > Cyanophyta > Chrysophyta show very low densities. Phytoplankton communities are characterized by higher species diversity, higher evenness and lower dominance. Abiotic factors register limited influence on richness and abundance of phytoplankton and on abundance of constituent groups. Multiple regression indicates relatively lower influence of fifteen abiotic factors on richness of phytoplankton and higher cumulative influence on abundance of phytoplankton, Chlorophyta, Dinophyta and Bacillariophyta.
    Attribution
    Sharma B.K. (2009). Journal of Threatened Taxa 8(1) pp. 401-410; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o2193.401-10