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8 documents found tagged population [X]
  • Title
    Status and population of vultures in Moyar Valley, southern India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Four species of vultures were surveyed using road transects in two parts of the Moyar Valley, three of these are Critically Endangered by IUCN criteria and one is Endangered. The vulture study was done for the first time in Nilgiri North Forest Division and Sathyamangalam Tiger Reserve of Moyar Valley to determine the flock size in the three species of vultures and also to get a rough estimation of vultures. The results show higher flock size and higher densities in Nilgiri North Forest Division than in Sathyamangalam Tiger Reserve and the most numerous of these was the White-rumped Vulture. There is also evidence of seasonal movements in Nilgiri North Forest Division. These data represent the first systematic survey results from the area and demonstrate the significance of the Moyar Valley for all four Endangered vulture species, probably the main stronghold remaining in southern India. They are White-rumped Vulture Gyps bengalensis, Indian Vulture Gyps indicus, Red-headed Vulture Sarcogyps calvus and Egyptian Vulture Neophron percnopterus. The study recommends that immediate long-term conservation efforts should be taken to save the Critically Endangered vultures in the Moyar Valley.
    Attribution
    Venkitachalam R., Senthilnathan S. (2016). Journal of Threatened Taxa 1(8) pp. 8358-8364; doi:10.11609/jott.2522.8.1.8358-8364
  • Title
    Diversity and distribution of Primula species in western Arunachal Pradesh, eastern Himalayan region, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    The paper highlights the diversity, distribution and population status of Primula species in western Arunachal Pradesh. The present study has established the rich diversity of Primula species in western Arunachal Pradesh with a record total of 25 species, out of which five species, viz., Primula ioessa W.W.Sm., Primula munroi Lindley, Primula obliqua W.W.Sm., Primula prolifera Wall. and Primula jigmediana Hook. f. & Thomson ex Watt, are new to Arunachal Pradesh.  More than 60% of the taxa of Primula of the state occurs in two districts of the western part of the state.  A maximum diversity (76%) of Primula species was recorded between 3500m and 4000m and a minimum (4%) was between 1500m and 2000m.  This study showed the poor population of some Primula species in the study area.  Among the four sampling sites the Panga-Teng-Tso is highly disturbed which is clearly reflected by very poor population density of P. hookeri (1.36 individuals m-2). Various natural and anthropogenic threats have led to the pressure on the habitat of Primula species. Considering the rich species diversity of Primula and their distributional affinities, western Arunachal Pradesh may be considered as a centre of diversity of Indo-Chinese Primula species and appropriate conservation strategies should be adopted for the conservation of this genus. 
    Attribution
    Bawri Amal, Gajurel Padma Raj, Paul Ashish, Khan Mohamed Latif (2015). Journal of Threatened Taxa 1(7) pp. 6788-6795; doi:10.11609/jott.1788.6788-6795
  • Title
    On the present status of distribution and threats of high value medicinal plants in the higher altitude forests of the Indian eastern Himalaya
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    The eastern Himalaya region is a rich repository of medicinal plants.  Excessive collection and unsustainable harvesting of medicinal plants from the wild are leading to a depletion of populations and threatening species in the region.  A study was conducted to explore the diversity, distribution and population status of selected medicinal plants species in the higher altitudes of Arunachal Pradesh, India through extensive field surveys and consultations with the local communities.  Out of about 75 medicinal plants recorded, 41 rare and commercially important medicinal plants were observed in the sub-temperate to alpine forest within an altitudinal range of 1500–4500 m.  Taxonomically these species fall under 25 families of higher plants, of which 31 are dicots, seven are monocots and three gymnosperms.  Many threatened species like Taxus wallichiana, Coptis teeta, Panax pseudoginseng, Panax sikkimensis were recorded in specific localities.  The western part of the state exhibits maximum species diversity.  Out of the various threats observed, improper harvesting, habitat loss and trade are found to be more destructive to the population.  Intensive efforts from both in situ and ex situ conservation practices are necessary for sustainable management and conservation of these species. 
    Attribution
    Gajurel P. R., Ronald Kh., Buragohain R., Rethy P., Singh B., Potsangbam S. (2015). Journal of Threatened Taxa 6(7) pp. 7243-7252; doi:10.11609/jott.2021.7243-7252
  • Title
    Status of Golden Jackal Canis aureus and ungulates in a small enclosed area- Van Vihar National Park, Madhya Pradesh, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    We estimated densities of Golden Jackals and five ungulate species in Van Vihar National Park, Madhya Pradesh, India.  It is an enclosed area of about 4.45km², out of which 3.5km² is available for free ranging animals.  Twenty-six transects with a combined length of 22.6km and an effort of 50.2km were walked.  A total of 1079 animal detections belonging to six different species were made.  The density of jackals was (17±3.8SE)/km2. Among the ungulates, chital had the highest density (118±18.8SE)/km2 followed by Sambar (34.1±6.9 SE)/km2, Nilgai (13.1±2.8SE)/km2, Blackbuck (6.6±1.5 SE)/km2 and Wild Pig (3.7±0.8 SE)/km2.  The ungulate biomass was found to be (12979.2±2463.26 SE)kg/km2.  Chital biomass was the highest at (5574.2±886.58 SE)kg/km2, followed by Sambar biomass of (4569.4±913.75 SE)kg/km2, Nilgai (2358±523.24 SE)kg/km2, Blackbuck (211.2±66.18 SE)kg/km2 and Wild Pig (118.4±28.37 SE)kg/km2.  The sex ratio was calculated and most ungulates had female-biased adult sex ratio. 
    Attribution
    Prerna S., Edgaonkar Advait, Dubey Yogesh (2015). Journal of Threatened Taxa 8(7) pp. 7416-7421; doi:10.11609/jott.2107.7416-7421
  • Title
    Ecological observations on the Indian Spiny-tailed Lizard Saara hardwickii (Gray, 1827) (Reptilia: Squamata: Agamidae) in Tal Chhapar Wildlife Sanctuary, Rajasthan, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Observations on the Indian Spiny-tailed Lizard Saara hardwickii (Gray, 1827) were undertaken in Tal Chhapar Wildlife Sanctuary, Rajasthan, India during the monsoons (July) following quadrat sampling that was time-constrained. The study revealed that the area is one of the preferable habitats for the species. A population analysis showed that the relative abundance of the subadults was higher, followed by juveniles and adults during the study period. The beginning of activity of the lizards was found to vary over the study period depending on prevailing weather conditions. The activity pattern was bimodal, except across rain events. The study revealed two important ecological findings about these lizards; complete sealing of burrow during rains which differed from partial sealing on normal days and complete diurnal cycle of body colour changes during the monsoon. Feeding was the predominant activity of this lizard followed by basking, resting and chasing each other. The adult lizards were found to be strictly herbivorous, in spite of an abundance of insects available in the area during the period. Subadults and juveniles were found to eat both plant parts, as well as insects. Microhabitat use such as inside grass clumps was found to be higher followed by barren ground, under shade and on stones.
    Attribution
    Das S.K., Dookia S., Das K., Dutta S.K. (2013). Journal of Threatened Taxa 1(5) pp. 3516-3526; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o2806.484
  • Title
    Some aspects of the ecology of the Indian Giant Squirrel Ratufa indica (Erxleben, 1777) in the tropical forests of Mudumalai Wildlife Sanctuary, southern India and their conservation implications
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    The Indian Giant Squirrel Ratufa indica, an endemic species to India, is widely distributed from the evergreen to moist and dry deciduous forests of Western and Eastern Ghats and the central Indian hills. We studied its population distribution, activity, feeding, ranging and nesting behaviour across three major habitats in the tropical forests of Mudumalai Wildlife Sanctuary, southern India, during 1998-2000 to manage the species effectively. Extensive survey of the three major habitats—tropical moist, dry deciduous and dry thorn—in the sanctuary shows that its distribution is continuous in moist and dry deciduous forests with good canopy contiguity and patchy along riverine areas in dry thorn and dry deciduous forests with sparse trees and broken canopy. Density estimates using 55 direct sightings from 199 km line transects show a mean of 2.9 (plus or minus 0.313) squirrels/km2. Daylight activity and feeding patterns assessed through 24,098 minutes of focal sampling reveal that animals feed and rest equal amounts of time. The diet constitutes seeds, bark, petioles, leaves and fruits from 25 plants, with Tectona grandis as the principal food source (41%). Its home range size varied from 0.8-1.7 ha with a mean of 1.3ha. Nesting characteristics assessed through 83 nests surveyed along 54km transects showed that the squirrel uses 15 of the 33 tree species found, with higher preference to Schleichera oleosa and Mangifera indica. Nest trees are significantly larger in height, gbh and canopy contiguity than nearest non-nest trees, which are attributed to better protection and escape from predators. Maintenance of diverse natural habitats and reduction in anthropogenic pressure are measures suggested for the conservation of giant squirrel populations in the study area.
    Attribution
    Baskaran N., Venkatesan S., Mani J., Srivastava S.K., Desai A.A. (2011). Journal of Threatened Taxa 7(3) pp. 1899-1908; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o2593.1899-908
  • Title
    Population densities and diurnal activity pattern of the Indian Roller Coracias benghalensis (Aves: Coraciiformes) in Nagapattinam District, Tamil Nadu, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Population densities and diurnal activity pattern of the Indian Roller were studied in Nagapattinam District over three years in different habitats. The agricultural lands supported the highest populations (41km-2), followed by river banks (36km-2) and social forests (32km-2); populations showed yearly variations in numbers and density in all habitats. On average, birds were observed to spend most of the day scanning (57%), with the remainder divided among feeding (16%), flying, (12%), preening (10%) and resting (5%). Some variations in activity breakdown were observed between time blocks, seasons and habitats.
    Attribution
    Asokan S., Ali A.M.S., Manikannan R., Nithiyanandam G.T. (2010). Journal of Threatened Taxa 10(2) pp. 1185-1191; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o2308.1185-91
  • Title
    Diversity and distribution of Primula species in western Arunachal Pradesh, eastern Himalayan region, India
    Type
    Report
    Description
    The paper highlights the diversity, distribution and population status of Primula species in western Arunachal Pradesh. The present study has established the rich diversity of Primula species in western Arunachal Pradesh with a record total of 25 species, out of which five species, viz., Primula ioessa W.W.Sm., Primula munroi Lindley, Primula obliqua W.W.Sm., Primula prolifera Wall. and Primula jigmediana Hook. f. & Thomson ex Watt, are new to Arunachal Pradesh. More than 60% of the taxa of Primula of the state occurs in two districts of the western part of the state. A maximum diversity (76%) of Primula species was recorded between 3500m and 4000m and a minimum (4%) was between 1500m and 2000m. This study showed the poor population of some Primula species in the study area. Among the four sampling sites the Panga-Teng-Tso is highly disturbed which is clearly reflected by very poor population density of P. hookeri (1.36 individuals m-2). Various natural and anthropogenic threats have led to the pressure on the habitat of Primula species. Considering the rich species diversity of Primula and their distributional affinities, western Arunachal Pradesh may be considered as a centre of diversity of Indo-Chinese Primula species and appropriate conservation strategies should be adopted for the conservation of this genus.
    Attribution
    Bawri, A., P.R. Gajurel, A. Paul & M.L. Khan (2015). Diversity and distribution of Primula species in western Arunachal Pradesh, eastern Himalayan region, India. Journal of Threatened Taxa 7(1): 6788–6795; http://dx.doi.org/10.11609/JoTT.o3721.6788-95