Leading up to the National Moth Week on July 22, we interview some contributors of moth observations.Listen to the first podcast episode with Nagesh O. S. on the IBP blog.

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2 documents found tagged protection [X]
  • Title
    Distribution of vultures in Uttar Pradesh, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    As carrion feeders vultures play an important ecological role.  Counts and qualitative assessments were done over three seasons to assess the richness and abundance of vultures in Uttar Pradesh during 2010–11.  Of nine species found in India, Uttar Pradesh has six: Egyptian Vulture Neophron percnopterus (45.9%), Slender-billed Vulture Gyps tenuirostris (25.4%), Indian Vulture (Long-billed Vulture) Gyps indicus (16.8%), White-rumped Vulture Gyps bengalensis (10.3%), Red-headed Vulture (King Vulture) Sarcogyps calvus (0.8%) and Himalayan Griffon Gyps himalayensis (0.7%).  We observed a total of 1993 adults and 91 juveniles, with the Tarai region having the greatest species richness and abundance.  Nesting tree species included Silk Cotton Bombax ceiba, Teak Tectona grandis, Haldu Haldina cordifolia and Sissoo Dalbergia sissoo.  A qualitative assessment indicated that the vulture population had declined in the past 10–15 years, with the main causes being the use of diclofenac, shortage of food and habitat loss.  Disposal of dead animals was mainly done by removing carcasses to village outskirts, where dogs, crows and egrets compete with vultures.  Such a small number of avian scavengers in a large area like Uttar Pradesh should be protected by ensuring safe and sufficient food, recovery from accidents and rehabilitation, and a protected environment.
    Attribution
    Jha Kaushalendra Kumar (2015). Journal of Threatened Taxa 1(7) pp. 6750-6763; doi:10.11609/jott.1784.6750-6763
  • Title
    Faunal diversity in a semi-evergreen forest of Bornadi-Khalingduar Complex of Assam, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    The Bornadi-Khalingduar Complex under the Manas Tiger Reserve, Assam is known to be an important area for wildlife movement to and from India and Bhutan. The contiguous landscape encompassing the two neighbouring countries provides a good habitat for diversity of wildlife and also as an important corridor area.  We carried out an opportunistic camera-trapping exercise to document the faunal diversity in the area. A month-long exercise photo-captured a total of 19 species belonging to 12 families, including the Leopard, Wild Dog, Leopard Cat, Binturong, Elephant, Sambar, Barking Deer and various birds. These findings of the study reveal the importance, threats and potential of the area and recommendations have been made to secure this corridor for continuous animal movement. Anthropogenic disturbance is a major deterrent to undisturbed animal movement in this area with resultant forest fragmentation and degradation. This indicates the need for effective conservation strategies in order to maintain the remnants of this corridor complex.  
    Attribution
    Chakraborty Pallabi, . Lalthanpuia, Sharma Tridip, Borah Jimmy, Sarmah Anupam (2015). Journal of Threatened Taxa 11(7) pp. 7770-7775; doi:10.11609/jott.2320.7770-7775