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6 documents found tagged rajasthan [X]
  • Title
    Re-sighting record of Fulvous Leaf-nosed Bat Hipposideros fulvus Gray, 1838 (Mammalia: Chiroptera: Hipposideridae) from Thar Desert, Rajasthan, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Here we report re-sighting records of the Fulvous Leaf-nosed Bat Hipposideros fulvus after a gap of almost four decades (37 years), from Rajasthan, India, on the basis of two male specimens collected from a cave dwelling colony of about 20 individuals from Jodhpur, Rajasthan, India. This species has been once reported in 1979 from a man-made tunnel in Mandore Garden in Jodhpur and later the same sighting information was re-quoted by several researchers. The present sighting from a new locality and the voucher specimen confirms the re-sighting of this species after a long gap.
    Attribution
    Sumit Dookia, Gajendra Singh & Rajlakshmi Mishra, Journal of Threatened Taxa, Vol 9, No 1 (2017); pp. 9764–9767http://dx.doi.org/10.11609/jott.2657.9.1.9764-9767
  • Title
    First record of Rusty-spotted Cat Prionailurus rubiginosus (Mammalia: Carnivora: Felidae) from Ramgarh-Vishdhari Wildlife Sanctuary in semi-arid landscape of Rajasthan, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Restricted to India and Sri Lanka in its distribution, the Rusty-spotted Cat <I>Prionailurus rubiginosus</I>is the smallest felid in the world. The present distribution of this species in India is to a large extent not thoroughly documented and is based on opportunistic sightings and reports. To date, the northernmost confirmed record of this cat is from Sariska and Ranthambhore Tiger Reserve. In this communication, we present evidence of this species from further south at Ramgarh-Vishdhari Wildlife Sanctuary from the state of Rajasthan.
    Attribution
    Sailaja Nayak, Sunny Shah & Jimmy Borah, Journal of Threatened Taxa, Vol 9, No 1 (2017); pp. 9761–9763http://dx.doi.org/10.11609/jott.3303.9.1.9761-9763
  • Title
    First record of Cinereous Vulture Aegypius monachus (Falconiformes: Accipitridae) from southern Rajasthan, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Vultures belong to the important scavenger group of birds. The population of which is fast declining. They have gained lot of attention of bird watchers during past few years. Present reporting in the first record of Cinereous Vulture Aegypius monachus from Ubeshwar, a pilgrim place near Udaipur City in south Rajasthan.
    Attribution
    Shekhawat D.S., Bhatnagar C., Koli V.K., Agarwal S. (2014). Journal of Threatened Taxa 4(6) pp. 5675-5676; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o3432.5675-6
  • Title
    Ecological observations on the Indian Spiny-tailed Lizard Saara hardwickii (Gray, 1827) (Reptilia: Squamata: Agamidae) in Tal Chhapar Wildlife Sanctuary, Rajasthan, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Observations on the Indian Spiny-tailed Lizard Saara hardwickii (Gray, 1827) were undertaken in Tal Chhapar Wildlife Sanctuary, Rajasthan, India during the monsoons (July) following quadrat sampling that was time-constrained. The study revealed that the area is one of the preferable habitats for the species. A population analysis showed that the relative abundance of the subadults was higher, followed by juveniles and adults during the study period. The beginning of activity of the lizards was found to vary over the study period depending on prevailing weather conditions. The activity pattern was bimodal, except across rain events. The study revealed two important ecological findings about these lizards; complete sealing of burrow during rains which differed from partial sealing on normal days and complete diurnal cycle of body colour changes during the monsoon. Feeding was the predominant activity of this lizard followed by basking, resting and chasing each other. The adult lizards were found to be strictly herbivorous, in spite of an abundance of insects available in the area during the period. Subadults and juveniles were found to eat both plant parts, as well as insects. Microhabitat use such as inside grass clumps was found to be higher followed by barren ground, under shade and on stones.
    Attribution
    Das S.K., Dookia S., Das K., Dutta S.K. (2013). Journal of Threatened Taxa 1(5) pp. 3516-3526; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o2806.484
  • Title
    Additional floral elements to the Ranthambhore Tiger Reserve, Rajasthan, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    The Ranthambhore Tiger Reserve (RTR) located in semi-arid zones of western India is popularly known for the Indian Tiger (Panthera tigris tigris) protection. Stretched over Aravalli and Vindhya ranges, the Reserve sustains a highly variable phytodiversity with dominant Anogeissus pendula Edgew. Forest cover. Floristic and ethnobotanical studies were conducted in the RTR during the years 2001-2005. This has resulted in adding, 141 species of flowering plants belonging to 113 genera spread over to 48 families, not recorded earlier. The recorded species are inventorised following Bentham and Hooker’s classification.
    Attribution
    Shrivastava A., Singh V. (2009). Journal of Threatened Taxa 9(1) pp. 475-480; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o2037.475-80
  • Title
    The status and distribution of major aquatic fauna in the National Chambal Gharial Sanctuary in Rajasthan with special reference to the Gangetic Dolphin Platanista gangetica gangetica (Cetartiodactyla: Platanistidae)
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    This paper records observation on the status and distribution of Gangetic Dolphin, Gharial, Mugger and other aquatic animals, and birds in the National Chambal Gharial Sanctuary in Rajasthan during the Chambal river expedition conducted with the Indian Army in May 1998. A total of five Gangetic Dolphins, nine Gharials, 14 Indian Mugger crocodiles and 118 species of birds were sighted during the survey of 350km-long stretch of the river Chambal from Keshoraipatan-Bundi to Dhaulpur. The current status of the riverine habitat in view of disturbance and other anthropogenic factors is discussed and suggestions made to safeguard the sanctuary from various threats.
    Attribution
    Nair A.K. (2009). Journal of Threatened Taxa 3(1) pp. 141-146; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o1615.141-6