Leading up to the National Moth Week on July 22, we interview some contributors of moth observations.Listen to the first podcast episode with Nagesh O. S. on the IBP blog.

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7 documents found tagged rare [X]
  • Title
    Butterflies associated with major forest types in Arunachal Pradesh (eastern Himalaya), India: implications for ecotourism and conservation planning
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    A three year study (from December 2011 to December 2014 and in June 2015) on butterflies covering four major forest sub-types as classified by H.G. Champion & S.K. Seth in 1968 in ‘Forest Types of India’, which occupy 60% of the forest area lying below 2,500m across Arunachal Pradesh State in the eastern Himalaya of India, revealed 415 taxa belonging to six families (Hesperiidae: 74 species of 42 genera; Papilionidae: 37 species of 10 genera; Pieridae: 36 species of 15 genera; Lycaenidae: 85 species of 49 genera; Riodinidae: 7 species of 3 genera & Nymphalidae: 176 species of 71 genera, respectively). These included many endemic and rare species typical of these forest sub-types, i.e., (i) 2B/1S1 Sub-Himalayan Light Alluvial Semi-Evergreen Forest (32 species), (ii) 2B/ C1(a) Assam Alluvial Plains Semi-Evergreen Forests (5 species), (iii) 2B/2S2 Eastern Alluvial Secondary Semi-Evergreen Forests- (15 species) and (iv) 3/1S2 (b) Terminalia-Duabanga (3 species), respectively. The relative number of species and individuals sampled were the highest at altitudes below 500m, and gradually declined as the altitude increased to 2,000m, and above 2,500m species richness declined sharply. The number of species and their relative abundance were the highest during July–August (Monsoon-first peak) and then again in November-December (Autumn-second peak), while the numbers were lowest during winter. These findings suggest that these four forest types are important both for the purpose of ecotourism as well as conservation of endemic and rare taxa found in the eastern Himalaya and northeastern India at altitudes below 2,000m. A complete list of all the taxa sampled is given along with relative abundance status during sampling, Indian Wildlife (Protection) Act, 1972 status, and distribution in different forest types in the state. Ten potential butterfly ecotourism zones are suggested for the state. Planning land-use for biodiversity conservation based on butterfly-forest type associations, by taking forest sub-types as units of conservation, is suggested as an option for the eastern Himalaya.
    Attribution
    Arun P. Singh, Journal of Threatened Taxa, Vol 9, No 4 (2017); pp. 10047–10075 http://doi.org/10.11609/jott.2765.9.4.10047-10075
  • Title
    A first note on foliicolous lichens of Assam, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    A first note on foliicolous lichens of Assam enumerating 26 species belonging to 15 genera and eight families are provided. Four species viz., Bacidina apiahica, Byssoloma chlorinum, Calopadia fusca and Strigula nitidula are reported for the first time from Assam. A number of rare species are present, including Aulaxina uniseptata, Calenia aspidota and Psorotheciopsis patellarioides.
    Attribution
    Pooja Gupta & G.P. Sinha, Journal of Threatened Taxa, Vol 8, No 7 (2016); pp. 9014–9023 http://dx.doi.org/10.11609/jott.1882.8.7.9014-9023
  • Title
    Recent record of a rarely recorded species, the Veined Palmer Hidari bhawani de Nicéville, 1888 (Lepidoptera: Hesperiidae: Aeromachini) from Jorhat, Assam, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    The paper reports the occurrence of a ‘very rare’ species, the  Veined Palmer or the Cresentric Skipper, Hidari bhawani from Jorhat, Assam during March and November’2014,after 6 decades in India. The genera Hidari occurs as only three species that are restricted to southeast Asia and H. bhawani being only species for this genera represented in India 
    Attribution
    Singh Arun P. (2015). Journal of Threatened Taxa 1(7) pp. 6839-6840; doi:10.11609/jott.1798.6839-6840
  • Title
    The seasonality of butterflies in a semi-evergreen forest: Gibbon Wildlife Sanctuary, Assam, northeastern India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    A study spanning 3.7 years on the butterflies of Gibbon Wildlife Sanctuary GWS (21km2), a semi-evergreen forest, in Jorhat District of Assam, northeastern India revealed 211 species of butterflies belonging to 115 genera including 19 papilionids and seven ‘rare’ and ‘very rare’ species as per Evans list of the Indian sub-continent (Great Blue Mime Papilio paradoxa telearchus; Brown Forest BobScobura woolletti; Snowy Angle Darpa pteria dealbatahas; Constable Dichorragia nesimachus; Grey Baron Euthalia anosia anosia; Sylhet Oakblue Arhopala silhetensis; Branded Yamfly Yasoda tripunctata). The butterflies showed a strong seasonality pattern in this forest with only one significant peak during the post monsoon (September-October) when 118 species were in flight inside the forest which slowly declined to 92 species in November-December. Another peak (102 species) was visible after winter from March to April. Species composition showed least similarity between pre-monsoon (March-May) and post-monsoon (October-November) seasons. The number of papilionid species were greater from July to December as compared from January to June. The findings of this study suggest that the pattern of seasonality in a semi-evergreen forest in northeastern India is distinct from that of the sub-tropical lowland forest in the Himalaya. Favourable logistics and rich diversity in GWS points to its rich potential in promoting ‘butterfly inclusive ecotourism’ in this remnant forest.
    Attribution
    Singh Arun P., Gogoi Lina, Sebastain Jis (2015). Journal of Threatened Taxa 1(7) pp. 6774-6787; doi:10.11609/jott.1786.6774-6787
  • Title
    Notes on Pemphis acidula J.R. Forst. & G. Forst. (Myrtales: Lythraceae) from Andaman Islands, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Pemphis acidula Forst. (Lythraceae) has been reported herein with locality data after a lapse of 91 years from Andaman Islands. This re-discovery is significant as P. acidula has not been added to the mangrove flora of India in many important national and international status reports. This species is characterized by its narrowly elliptic to lanceolate leaves that are densely covered with silky hairs on both surfaces, crumpled white petals, capsule with circumscissile dehiscence and winged seeds. Further, new morphological discoveries viz., tetramerous and pentamerous flowers were reported in the present study in contrast to the perfect hexamerous flowers reported elsewhere. Since P. acidula is sparsely distributed, location-specific conservation strategies should be adapted in order to prevent its local extinction from the Islands. In addition, exploratory surveys are imperative particularly in calcareous rocky habitats for authenticating the wider distribution of such rare species. 
    Attribution
    Goutham-Bharathi M.P., Immanuel Titus, Kaliyamoorthy M., Gogoi Nitul Kumar, Sankar R. Kiruba, Roy S. Dam (2015). Journal of Threatened Taxa 8(7) pp. 7471-7474; doi:10.11609/jott.2115.7471-7474
  • Title
    Ecology and conservation of threatened plants in Tapkeshwari Hill ranges in the Kachchh Island, Gujarat, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    The survey was conducted in Tapkeshwari Hill Range (THR) areas, wherever threatened plant species were said to exist, based on secondary information in literature. Thirteen plant species categorized as ‘Threatened’ by the World Conservation Monitoring centre (WCMC 1994) and also listed under various threat categories in the Red Data Book of Indian Plants (Nayar & Sastry 1988) were surveyed in the THR. All the RET plants reported from the study area occupied eight major habitat types. Thorn mixed forests harbored the highest number of individuals (560) of all RET plants, followed by open scrubs (345 individuals), Acacia senegal forests (328) and thorn mixed scrubs (293). Field observations showed that except Helichrysum cutchicum, all the other RET plant species were reported with very low seedlings and regeneration ratio. This paper discusses the status, distribution and threats faced and the conservation implications at border regions of some of the threatened plants of the arid Kachchh district.
    Attribution
    Joshi P.N., Joshi E.B., Jain B.K. (2012). Journal of Threatened Taxa 2(4) pp. 2390-2397; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o2410.2390-7
  • Title
    Rare Aquatic Bird Species of Western Ghats
    Type
    Report
    Description
    Rare Aquatic birds of the western Ghats