Leading up to the National Moth Week on July 22, we interview some contributors of moth observations.Listen to the first podcast episode with Nagesh O. S. on the IBP blog.

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2 documents found tagged rivers [X]
  • Title
    On the Behaviour, abundance, habitat use and potential threats of the Gangetic Dolphin Platanista gangetica in southern West Bengal, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    The Ganga River Dolphin Platanista gangetica Roxburgh, 1801 is a globally endangered cetacean found in the River system of Ganga, Brahmaputra and Meghna in Bangladesh and India. A survey and research were conducted from 2012–2014 to explore the behaviour, abundance, habitat use and potential threats of the Dolphin in the lower, middle and upper stretches of the river Ganga and its tributaries in southern West Bengal. The study recorded different types of surfacing patterns with respect to their age class as well as on diurnal activity pattern of the individual. The adults and sub-adults were found to have different types of surfacing during different hours of the day. The morning and afternoon were observed to be feeding hours of the Dolphin. Multiple potential threats were encountered during the present study such as destructive fishing gears, dumping of solid and municipal waste, industrial effluents, agricultural run-off, construction of water structures, water extraction and reduction of river depth attributed to siltation. These factors contributed to the present study of the river dolphins in the Ganga, which are localised at certain pockets in good number.
    Attribution
    Mahua Roy Chowdhury, Sangita Mitra & Saswati Sen, Journal of Threatened Taxa, Vol 8, No 9 (2016); pp. 9131–9137 http://dx.doi.org/10.11609/jott.1752.8.9.9131-9137
  • Title
    Practices and attitudes of Indian catch-and-release anglers: identifying opportunities for advancing the management of recreational fisheries
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Recreational fishing, a popular leisure activity, can potentially support conservation of species and provide socio-economic benefits to local economies.  Nonetheless, there are ecological concerns regarding this pastime, especially in developing economies such as India where little information is available concerning impacts on fish populations.  An online survey targeting recreational anglers practicing catch-and-release (C&R) in India (n=200) revealed 25 states/union territories as prime angling locations, with Mahseer (Tor spp.) constituting the main target species group (53%).  Angling season (28%) and pristine river surroundings (14%) were stated as major factors important for angling, while overfishing (31%) and the use of illegal fishing techniques were highlighted as chief threats to fish species.  Respondents were in favour of strictly adhering to C&R guidelines (23%), controlling illegal fishing techniques and pollution (18%) and spreading awareness and education among local stakeholders (18%) to protect fish.  Over 75% of respondents were also willing to contribute both their time and money to conservation initiatives focusing on key sport fish.  With anglers targeting multiple fishing locations throughout India, there is a need for consistent governance structures and policy instruments to support the development of sustainable recreational fisheries while minimising conflict with other stakeholder groups.  The impacts of C&R fisheries interactions on individuals and populations (especially for threatened species) need to be studied in the Indian context.  Direct participation by recreational anglers in C&R research could strengthen broader conservation and management initiatives throughout the country by increasing stewardship.  
    Attribution
    Gupta Nishikant, Bower Shannon D., Cooke Steven J., Danylchuk Andy J., Raghavan Rajeev; Journal of Threatened Taxa Vol 8, No 4 (2016) 26/4/2016; pp. 8659-8665; 10.11609/jott.2410.8.4.8659-8665