Leading up to the National Moth Week on July 22, we interview some contributors of moth observations.Listen to the first podcast episode with Nagesh O. S. on the IBP blog.

Featured Document

Browse Documents

2 documents found tagged road kill [X]
  • Title
    Effect of vehicular traffic on wild animals in Sigur Plateau, Tamil Nadu, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    The construction of a road, directly and indirectly, impacts on the ecosystems where the road is built. Highways passing through national reserves/wildlife sanctuaries have an adverse impact on wild animals. The present survey was conducted to estimate the road kills on the state highways passing through the Nilgiri north territorial forest division (19km) and Mudumalai Tiger Reserve (15km) in Sigur Plateau, Tamil Nadu, India. The road kills were monitored three times a month between July 2013 and December 2013 (six months) and a total of 176 road kills belonging to 30 species were recorded. Reptiles were the most affected taxa (39%), followed by mammals (33%) and birds (21%). Amphibians were least affected by vehicular traffic and comprised 7% of the total kills. According to road stretch category, the overall road kill was N=135 in the forested area and N=41 in human habitations. A total of 812 food materials were encounterd 612km with average of 1.32 food materials / km. Conservation and management implications are essential to prevent the local extinction of wildlife.
    Attribution
    A. Samson, B. Ramakrishnan, A. Veeramani, P. Santhoshkumar, S. Karthick, G. Sivasubramanian, M. Ilakkia, A. Chitheena, J. Leona Princy & P. Ravi, Journal of Threatened Taxa, Vol 8, No 9 (2016); pp. 9182–9189 http://dx.doi.org/10.11609/jott.1962.8.9.9182-9189
  • Title
    Road kill of animals by highway traffic in the tropical forests of Mudumalai Tiger Reserve, southern India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Highways passing through natural reserves have adverse impact on wild animals. We evaluated the road kill of vertebrate fauna by vehicular traffic on highways at Mudumalai Tiger Reserve, southern India. In a fortnight’s survey over 248km across three public roads and opportunistic sampling method, a minimum of 180 road kills belonging to 40 species of amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals were recorded between December 1998 and March 1999. Amphibians were the most affected taxa (53%) of road kills followed by reptiles (22%), mammals (18%); including a leopard (Panthera pardus) and birds (7%). Amphibians and reptiles are slow to react to vehicles and this along with the drivers’ ignorance probably leads to higher mortality among these species. Road kills are significantly higher on highway stretches along rivers than those without water bodies nearby. We suggest the construction of flyovers, speed limits, speed breakers and signposts along the highways to reduce vehicle-caused wildlife mortalities.
    Attribution
    Baskaran N., Boominathan D. (2010). Journal of Threatened Taxa 3(2) pp. 753-759; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o2101.753-9