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5 documents found tagged species diversity [X]
  • Title
    Avifaunal diversity in Assam University Campus, Silchar, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    We conducted a bird survey in the Assam University campus, Silchar from February 2011 to June 2011. A total of 73 species of birds belonging to 56 genera, 32 families and 13 orders was recorded. Significantly, the highest number of bird species restricted to only one particular habitat (17 species) was recorded in the forest area called ‘eco-forest’ (χ2=18, df=3, P<0.01). The highest similarity of bird species was found between degraded area and secondary growth area, and the lowest was found between eco-forest and degraded area. Species richness and dominance of species were more in the eco-forest area. The diversity of species was more in the secondary growth area. Red-vented Bulbul, Spotted Dove and Red-whiskered Bulbul were the most abundant and frequent bird species found in campus. The avifaunal diversity in the study area shows the importance of the University campus as an ideal bird habitat.
    Attribution
    Chakdar Biswajit, Choudhury Parthankar, Singha Hilloljyoti (2016). Journal of Threatened Taxa 1(8) pp. 8369-8378; doi:10.11609/jott.2524.8.1.8369-8378
  • Title
    An overview of fish fauna of Raigad District, northern Western Ghats, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    We studied the fish fauna of Raigad District for two years from August 2008 to August 2010. Sixty six freshwater and secondary freshwater fish species belonging to 31 families and 53 genera were collected from various sampling sites and local markets along the banks of Patalganga, Bhogawati, Amba, Kundalika, Mandad and Savitri river systems present in Raigad District, Maharashtra, northern Western Ghats. Cyprinids were the most dominant group represented by 22 fish species belonging to 13 genera followed by the loaches, croakers and gobies belonging to the family Balitoridae, Sciaenidae and Gobiidae respectively (three species from each family). Of the 66 fish species, five belong to the Vulnerable (VU), four to Near Threatened (NT), 37 to the Least Concern (LC) category and 20 were found to be not evaluated for IUCN Red List criteria. Raigad District is under severe threat of rapid industrialization and urbanization. Further, introduced exotic fish species are becoming a major threat to the indigenous fish fauna of Raigad District. Implementation of ecosystem based adaptation plans and conservation measures are necessary to protect the diverse, endemic and threatened fish fauna of Raigad District.
    Attribution
    Katwate Unmesh, Raut Rupesh, Advani Sahir (2012). Journal of Threatened Taxa 5(4) pp. 2569-2577; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o2760.2569-77
  • Title
    Butterfly diversity in tropical moist deciduous sal forests of Ankua Reserve Forest, Koina Range, Saranda Division, West Singhbhum District, Jharkhand, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Butterflies were sampled during February and September 2008 using pollard walk method to assess the species diversity in the tropical moist deciduous sal forest habitats of Ankua Reserve Forest, Koina Range, Saranda Division, West Singhbhum District, Jharkhand. This area, a total of 999.9ha, is being proposed for lease under an iron ore mining project. This short-term study revealed high beta diversity of butterflies in these forest tracts, with 71 species recorded. Of these, two species, Leopard Lacewing Cethosia cyane (Drury, 1773) and Restricted Demon Notocrypta curvifascia (C. & R. Felder, 1862), are new records for Jharkhand state while three other species recorded are listed in the Indian Wildlife (Protection) Act 1972. This study provides support for long-term conservation of these fragmented sal forest tracts to ensure biodiversity protection.
    Attribution
    Singh A.P. (2010). Journal of Threatened Taxa 9(2) pp. 1130-1139; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o2274.1130-9
  • Title
    Diversity and distribution of macrofungi in the man-made Pitchandikulam Forest of Tamil Nadu, southern India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Diversity and distribution of macrofungi in relation to rainfall and humidity in the man-made Pitchandikulam Forest of Tamil Nadu, southern India were studied. The 335 samples from five study plots were composed of 18 species assigned to 14 genera and eight families. Species density ranged from 46 to 87 individuals per plot. Of these, 164 collections were from soil, 147 from leaf litter, 21 from twig and 3 from dead wood. The Shannon diversity index ranged from 0.64 to 0.91. Overall, four species, i.e. Lycoperdon sp. (63 individuals), Marasmiellus nigripes (58), Termitomyces sp.1 (53) and Marasmiellus sp.1 (39) were recorded from all the plots. The species rank abundance measures were used to visualize distribution. Linear regression indicated no relationship between rainfall and species density. The quantitative analysis of macrofungi revealed a positive trend towards re-creation of forest too.
    Attribution
    Mani S., Kumaresan V. (2009). Journal of Threatened Taxa 6(1) pp. 340-343; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o2129.340-3
  • Title
    Diversity of microcrustacea (Crustacea: Branchiopoda) of Loktak Lake, a Ramsar site, Manipur, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Microcrustacea of Loktak Lake (collected during Nov. 2002-Oct. 2004) reveal 57 species and show qualitative dominance of Cladocera (51 species). They indicate monthly richness ranging between 33�plus or minus 6 and 32� plus or minus 6 species, record 51.7-82.3 and 53.6-90.0% community similarities during two years respectively, and follow trimodal annual patterns with peaks during winter. The microcrustaceans (112� plus or minus 17 and 124� plus or minus 13 n/l) form an important quantitative component (45.7� plus or minus 4.9 and 43.3� plus or minus 3.7 %) of zooplankton and show broadly trimodal annual patterns with peak abundance during winter. Cladocera > Copepoda mainly contribute to their quantitative variations. ANOVA registers significant monthly variations of microcrustacea richness and significant annual and monthly variations of their abundance. Richness is positively correlated with dissolved oxygen and is negatively correlated with rainfall, hardness, chloride and total dissolved solids while abundance is negatively correlated with pH only. Multiple regressions indicate higher cumulative effect of 15 abiotic factors on richness and abundance. Our results indicate no definite periodicity of richness and abundance of microcrustacea or their constituent groups during two annual cycles and are characterized by their higher species diversity, higher evenness and lower dominance.
    Attribution
    Sharma B.K., Sharma S. (2009). Journal of Threatened Taxa 11(1) pp. 541-548; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o2231.541-8