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10 documents found tagged species richness [X]
  • Title
    The butterfly (Insecta: Lepidoptera) diversity of four sacred groves of Goa, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    The butterfly diversity of four sacred groves in Goa, viz., Nirankarachi Rai, Alvatinichi Rai, Mharinginichi Rai and Azobhachi Rai was selected for study purposes.  A total of 33 species belonging to 31 genera were observed which accounts for about 13% of the species recorded from Goa.  The Family Nymphalidae dominated with a high number of species with maximum diversity in Mharinginichi Rai.  It is concluded that further studies on groves from different habitats will significantly increase this number.  
    Attribution
    Gaude Kiran, Janarthanam M. K. (2015). Journal of Threatened Taxa 12(7) pp. 7927-7932; doi:10.11609/jott.2382.7927-7932
  • Title
    Avifauna of Thummalapalle Uranium Mining Area, Andhra Pradesh, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    The avifauna of Thummalapalle Uranium Mining Area in Kadapa and Anantapur districts of Andhra Pradesh consists of 99 species belonging to 43 families as observed during the two-and-half year long study between 2009 and 2012.  The majority of them are residents (92%) and a very few are local migrants (5%) and winter migrants (2%), and inclusive of 47 species that are common, 13 occasional, 17 uncommon and 22 rare.
    Attribution
    Reddy Y. Amarnath, Sadasivaiah B., Rajakullaiswamy K., Indira P., Pullaiah T. (2014). Journal of Threatened Taxa 12(6) pp. 6556-6565; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o3318.6556-65
  • Title
    Moth diversity of Tawang District, Arunachal Pradesh, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    This paper documents results of an expedition to Tawang district (Arunachal Pradesh) by the Zoological Survey of India, during the period 27th September 2009 to 15th October 2009. Field camps were established at two places i.e. Lumla and Zemmethang. From these two camps, collections of moths were made at various localities by installing light traps. During the survey, more than 250 morpho-species were collected, of which 102 species pertaining to 15 families were identified. The analysis of the fauna revealed that the moth fauna of the area is dominated by the family Geometridae, followed by Arctiidae, Drepanidae, Crambidae, Lymantriidae, Noctuidae, Uraniidae, Lasiocampidae, Sphingidae, Pyralidae, Zygaenidae, Bombycidae, Saturniidae, Pantheidae and Notodontidae.
    Attribution
    Chandra K., Sambath S. (2013). Journal of Threatened Taxa 1(5) pp. 3565-3570; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o2718.966
  • Title
    CEPF Western Ghats Special Series: Mammals of the Meghamalai landscape, southern Western Ghats, India - a review
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Reports on the concurrence of mammals in the Meghamalai landscape were collated from published literature and also the data obtained from a recent study spanning over 18 months (June 2011-December 2012). Sixty-three species belonging to 24 families occur in the landscape, which include 24 globally threatened (one Critically Endangered; seven Endangered; 11 Vulnerable and five Near Threatened) species. Of the recorded species, four species are endemic to India and nine are endemic to the Western Ghats. The present study added five species, viz., Rusty-spotted Cat Prionailurus rubiginosus, Malabar Spiny Tree Mouse Platacanthomys lasiurus, Grizzled Giant Squirrel Ratufa macroura, Common Palm Civet Paradoxurus hermaphrodites and the Indian Grey Mongoose Herpestes edwardsii to the six decade old mammal list. But, 13 species reported by Hutton were not recorded during the study. Among them, occurrence of Malabar Civet Viverra civettina and Fishing Cat Prionailurus viverrinus in southern India remains unresolved. During our study, anthropogenic pressures such as conversion of natural habitats, encroachment, hunting, cattle grazing and tourism were observed to affect the distribution of mammals in the landscape.
    Attribution
    Babu S., Srinivas G., Kumara H.N., Tamilarasu K., Molur S. (2013). Journal of Threatened Taxa 15(5) pp. 4945-4952; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o3596.4945-52
  • Title
    Distribution of catfishes in wetlands of two flood plain districts in Tamil Nadu, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    A study was conducted on the distribution of catfishes in selected wetlands in Kancheepuram and Kanyakumari districts of Tamil Nadu, southern India. Different types of wetlands such as tanks, pools, lakes, open wells and estuaries were selected for the study based on their different environmental set up. Fishes were collected with the help of fishermen using cast and seine nets. Twelve species of catfishes from five families (Ariidae, Bagridae, Heteropneustidae, Schilbeidae and Siluridae) were recorded, of which 10 species from four families were from Kanyakumari and six species belonging to three families were from Kancheepuram District. In Kancheepuram, the species recorded were Heteropneustes fossilis, Mystus seengtee, M. gulio, M. keletius, M. vittatus and Neotropius atherinoides, and in Kanyakumari the species recorded were Arius arius, Arius subrostratus, Heteropneustes fossilis, Mystus armatus, M. seengtee, M. gulio, M. montanus, M. vittatus, Ompok bimaculatus and O. malabaricus. Among the wetlands, the highest species richness was seen in Puthery and Erachakulam tanks in Kanyakumari and Chembarampakkam Lake in Kancheepuram. The lowest species richness was observed was in Vishnupuram, Thotiode tanks and Mavadi pool of the former district and Vandalur Tank, Kalpakkam Estuary of the latter. Environmental factors such as microhabitat diversity and substrate diversity in the wetlands significantly influenced species richness.
    Attribution
    Rajagopal B., Davidar P. (2013). Journal of Threatened Taxa 17(5) pp. 5277-5282; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o2889.5277-82
  • Title
    Avian diversity in the Naliya Grassland, Abdasa Taluka, Kachchh, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Naliya Grassland is one of the significant grasslands of Gujarat. In this study the importance of the Naliya Grassland has been explored with special reference to avian diversity. Field work for the study was carried out throughout the year of 2007 on a monthly basis covering three distinct seasons to explore avian diversity. A total of 177 species belonging to 54 families were recorded wherein most species belonged to the family Accipitridae (20 species) followed by Alaudidae (11 species). Of the total families, five were represented by more than seven species, 18 families by 3-7 species and 31 families by one or two species respectively. Among the species observed, 16 species ware globally threatened (three Critically Endangered, four Endangered and nine Near Threatened). Most of the species were chiefly terrestrial (68.2%), about 23.9% species were freshwater dependant and 7.9% utilized mixed habitats. Maximum species richness was recorded in the monsoons and minimum in summer. Constant turnover and fluctuation in species richness occurred because of seasonal immigration and emigration. Maximum emigration took place during February and March and maximum immigration occurred during June and July. Many water dependant birds attracted to the flooded grassland during the monsoons explained the high species richness during this season. In winter, the area was inhabited by resident species as well as many migratory species.
    Attribution
    Munjpara Sandeep B, Gadhvi Indra R (2012). Journal of Threatened Taxa 3(4) pp. 2454-2463; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o2679.2454-63
  • Title
    CEPF Western Ghats Special Series : Streamside amphibian communities in plantations and a rainforest fragment in the Anamalai hills, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Stream amphibian communities, occupying a sensitive environment, are often useful indicators of effects of adjoining land uses. We compared abundance and community composition of anuran amphibians along streams in tea monoculture, shade coffee plantation, and a rainforest fragment in Old Valparai area of the Anamalai hills. Overall species density and rarefaction species richness was the highest in rainforest fragment and did not vary between the coffee and tea land uses. Densities of certain taxa, and consequently community composition, varied significantly among the land uses, being greater between rainforest fragment and tea monoculture with shade coffee being intermediate. Observed changes are probably related to streamside alteration due to land use, suggesting the need to retain shade tree cover and remnant riparian rainforest vegetation as buffers along streams.
    Attribution
    Murali R., Raman T.R.S. (2012). Journal of Threatened Taxa 9(4) pp. 2849-2856; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o2829.2849-56
  • Title
    Status of waterbirds at Hathnikund Barrage wetland, Yamunanagar District, Haryana, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    We surveyed the waterbirds of Hathnikund barrage wetland in Haryana for two successive winters between October and March during 2007-08 and 2008-09. Twelve field visits were made at monthly intervals. In total, 31 species including five new additions to the waterbirds of the wetland were recorded. Of these 31, five species (16.2%) were very common, six (19.3%) common, another six uncommon and 14 (45.1%) less common. The waterbird assemblages were dominated by species like Brahminy Shelduck, Northern Pintail, Gadwall, Common Pochard, and Great Cormorant. The maximum species diversity was represented by the family Anatidae, followed by Ardeidae and Scolopacidae.
    Attribution
    Tak P.C., Sati J.P., Rizvi A.N. (2010). Journal of Threatened Taxa 4(2) pp. 841-844; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o2200.841-4
  • Title
    Temporal variations in dung beetle (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) assemblages in Kurukshetra, Haryana, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Temporal variations in the assemblage were studied in the active period of dung beetles in Kurukshetra, Haryana. The beetles were collected by fixing five pitfall bait traps at weekly interval for 24 hrs. Then the collected specimens were identified to species level and counted. A total of 7668 individuals of 23 species belonging to 3 subfamilies (Hybosorinae, Aphodiinae and Scarabaeinae) were collected from the study area. Of the beetles collected, A.campestris was the most abundant. Maximum species (95.65%) and individuals (52.58%) were found during June and minimum species (43.48%) and individuals (0.57%) in April. species richness and abundance was found to increase over the months till June. Then there was some irregularity in their pattern. There were only 6 species found throughout the year and only 3 species found only once during whole the study period. Out of 23 species 43.48% species showed their peak abundance in the month of June. Monthly á-diversity was calculated and found to be maximum in August (2.55). Assemblage size depended on the species richness and individual population, which affected the mean abundance of that particular assemblage.
    Attribution
    Kakkar N., Gupta S.K. (2009). Journal of Threatened Taxa 9(1) pp. 481-483; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o2075.481-3
  • Title
    Diversity, distribution and assemblage structure of fishes in streams of southern Western Ghats, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Diversity, distribution and assemblage structure of fishes were studied in 10 selected streams of southern Western Ghats. The sampling was performed between April 2001 and March 2002. Sixty species of primary freshwater fishes belonging to four orders, 13 families and 27 genera were recorded from the study area. Cyprinids were the most dominant assemblage members in all study streams. Maximum number of species, number of individuals and cyprinids were recorded from Thalayanai stream. More specialized forms Homaloptera santhamparaiensis, Glyptothorax madraspatanum, Noemacheilus guentheri, N. keralensis, N. semiarmatus and N. triangularis were recorded in Panniyar stream. High diversity was observed in Achankoil stream. Evenness index of similarity was uniform in all study streams. Similarity cluster analysis showed streams from nearby basins had similar faunal assemblages. Principal Component Analysis was performed to study the similarity of fish assemblages between the study streams. The analysis described clear pattern of segregation between Thalayanai and Karaiyar (east flowing) and Kallar and Achankoil (west flowing) streams. Thirty-nine Western Ghats endemic fishes were recorded from the study area. Current distribution and threats to endemic fishes are discussed.
    Attribution
    Johnson J.A., Arunachalam M. (2009). Journal of Threatened Taxa 10(1) pp. 507-513; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o2146.507-13