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6 documents found tagged status [X]
  • Title
    An ecological assessment of Hispid Hare Caprolagus hispidus (Mammalia: Lagomorpha: Leporidae) in Manas National Park, Assam, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    This study of the Hispid Hare Caprolagus hispidus in the tall grassland habitat of Manas National Park, Assam during 2009–2010 is the first detailed assessment in northeastern India.  We assessed the status, distribution, habitat use and key threats to this rare and little studied lagomorph species.  After interviewing local forest staff, 20 grassland patches within a survey area of 2.65ha were selected and transects (50x2 m) laid randomly to determine the presence/absence of Hispid Hare by recording pellets and other indirect evidence.  Hare presence was recorded in 17 grassland patches within transects dominated by Imperata cylindrica and Saccharum narenga.  Hispid Hare preferred dry savannah grasslands to wet alluvial grasslands during winter and avoided recently burned patches due to lack of cover and food.  The distribution pattern observed was clumped (s2/a = 6.2), with more evidence of Hispid Hare presence in areas where ground cover was dense, dry and away from water sources. Population density was estimated at 381.55 individuals/km2, which in comparison with other studies indicates that Manas National Park currently holds the highest density of Hispid Hare.  Habitat loss due to overgrazing, unsustainable thatch harvesting, burning of grassland, weed invasion, encroachment and hunting were identified as key threats which must be addressed to ensure survival of this threatened species in the Park.  
    Attribution
    Nath Naba K., Machary Kamal (2015). Journal of Threatened Taxa 15(7) pp. 8195-8204; doi:10.11609/jott.2461.7.15.8195-8204
  • Title
    Status and conservation of Eastern Hoolock Gibbon Hoolock leuconedys in Assam, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    A field survey was conducted in 2010 from March to May in the reserve forests of Sadiya sub-division, in the Tinsukia District of Assam, India, to investigate the status of the Hoolock Gibbon. The data were collected using modified line-transect and call-count methods. We recorded 10 groups of gibbons in three reserve forests, through direct sighting. Of the 33 individuals recorded through direct sighting 63.6% were adults, 21.2% juveniles and 15.2% infants. The average group size of the sighted groups was 3.3 individuals, with an adult sex ratio of 1:1.1. We also recorded 10 groups of Rhesus Macaques in the area. Anthropogenic pressures included encroachment, felling of trees and inadequate infrastructure, and these were the major threats for Hoolock Gibbon and other wildlife in the region. Notably, the gibbons of Sadiya have been identified as the Eastern Hoolock Gibbon Hoolock leuconedys and this is the first report of the species from Assam.
    Attribution
    Chetry R., Chetry D., Bhattacharjee P.C. (2012). Journal of Threatened Taxa 13(4) pp. 3183-3189; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o3073.3183-9
  • Title
    Past and present status of the Indian Tiger in northern West Bengal, India: an overview
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Changes in the distribution range and the estimates of Tiger (Panthera tigris) populations in northern West Bengal from the late 19th century to 2009 were examined in detail. According to a 2004 census there were 70 tigers in the region, while a 2008 estimate put the number at 8-12. The tiger survives only in protected areas of terai and duars extending over about 1000km2 of Buxa, Jaldapara, Neora Valley and Mahananda, the Panighat and Bamanpokhri Ranges of Kurseong Division and the Chilapata and Kodalbusty Ranges under Wildlife-III Division. Tigers became extinct in Chapramari Sanctuary about a decade back; Gorumara sightings were recorded up to the 1980s. The species has already lost about 1000km2 of its historic range in the territorial forest divisions of Darjeeling, Jalpaiguri, Cooch Behar, Dinajpur and Malda Districts. The State Forest Department has undertaken efforts involving regular monitoring, protection measures and habitat improvements and tigers are now being sighted in areas where they were absent for years. Resident tigers appear to be expanding their ranges to new areas, sometimes at higher altitudes as in Neora Valley National Park and Buxa Tiger Reserve crossing into Bhutan and Sikkim.
    Attribution
    Mallick J.K. (2010). Journal of Threatened Taxa 3(2) pp. 739-752; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o2212.739-52
  • Title
    Status of waterbirds at Hathnikund Barrage wetland, Yamunanagar District, Haryana, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    We surveyed the waterbirds of Hathnikund barrage wetland in Haryana for two successive winters between October and March during 2007-08 and 2008-09. Twelve field visits were made at monthly intervals. In total, 31 species including five new additions to the waterbirds of the wetland were recorded. Of these 31, five species (16.2%) were very common, six (19.3%) common, another six uncommon and 14 (45.1%) less common. The waterbird assemblages were dominated by species like Brahminy Shelduck, Northern Pintail, Gadwall, Common Pochard, and Great Cormorant. The maximum species diversity was represented by the family Anatidae, followed by Ardeidae and Scolopacidae.
    Attribution
    Tak P.C., Sati J.P., Rizvi A.N. (2010). Journal of Threatened Taxa 4(2) pp. 841-844; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o2200.841-4
  • Title
    Endemic Marsh Mongoose Herpestes palustris (Carnivora: Herpestidae) of East Kolkata Wetlands, India: a status report
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Marsh Mongoose Herpestes palustris is the only extant endemic mammal of the East Kolkata wetlands, which has been declared a RAMSAR site in 2002. Since its first description by the scientists of the Zoological Survey of India, the population of this species has dwindled to an alarming state due to reclamation of the Salt Lake City and Rajarhat expansion, as well as from other anthropogenic causes. Recently, during a field survey only a small population of this endangered mongoose was found in a single location. Immediate conservation measures are required to be taken by the concerned authorities to stop its probable extinction in the near future.
    Attribution
    Mallick J.K. (2009). Journal of Threatened Taxa 4(1) pp. 215-220; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o1936.215-20
  • Title
    Avifaunal diversity in the University Campus of Kurukshetra, Haryana
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    A survey of avian fauna of Kurukshetra university campus was carried out by direct observation from January, 2005 to December, 2008. Occurrence of 92 bird species belonging to 67 genera and 37 families with their status, abundance and feeding habit of was recorded.
    Attribution
    Gupta S.K., Kumar P., Malik M.K. (2009). Journal of Threatened Taxa 12(1) pp. 629-632; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o2159.629-32