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5 documents found tagged threats [X]
  • Title
    On the Behaviour, abundance, habitat use and potential threats of the Gangetic Dolphin Platanista gangetica in southern West Bengal, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    The Ganga River Dolphin Platanista gangetica Roxburgh, 1801 is a globally endangered cetacean found in the River system of Ganga, Brahmaputra and Meghna in Bangladesh and India. A survey and research were conducted from 2012–2014 to explore the behaviour, abundance, habitat use and potential threats of the Dolphin in the lower, middle and upper stretches of the river Ganga and its tributaries in southern West Bengal. The study recorded different types of surfacing patterns with respect to their age class as well as on diurnal activity pattern of the individual. The adults and sub-adults were found to have different types of surfacing during different hours of the day. The morning and afternoon were observed to be feeding hours of the Dolphin. Multiple potential threats were encountered during the present study such as destructive fishing gears, dumping of solid and municipal waste, industrial effluents, agricultural run-off, construction of water structures, water extraction and reduction of river depth attributed to siltation. These factors contributed to the present study of the river dolphins in the Ganga, which are localised at certain pockets in good number.
    Attribution
    Mahua Roy Chowdhury, Sangita Mitra & Saswati Sen, Journal of Threatened Taxa, Vol 8, No 9 (2016); pp. 9131–9137 http://dx.doi.org/10.11609/jott.1752.8.9.9131-9137
  • Title
    The Nilgiri Tahr (Mammalia: Cetartiodactyla: Bovidae: Nilgiritragus hylocrius Ogilby, 1838) in the Agastyamalai range, Western Ghats, India: population status and threats
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    The Nilgiri Tahr (Nilgiritragus hylocrius Ogilby, 1838) has not been comprehensively surveyed in the southern Western Ghats, India. Here we present results of a survey conducted in 2012 and 2013 in 25 sites where Nilgiri Tahr was reported in Agastyamalai range south of the Shencottah gap. The objectives of the survey were to assess population status; evaluate threats and propose conservation measures. In each site the geographical coordinates were noted. If Nilgiri Tahr (=Tahr) were sighted, the number and herd structure were recorded. Indirect signs of Tahr presence such as faecal pellets and feedback from local informants were noted in sites with no direct sightings of Tahr. The total sightings were 247 Tahr in 10 sites, and indication of Tahr presence in seven sites. Only two populations viz. Kalamalai-Varraiattumudi and Muthukulivayal-Balamore were large (>30 individuals). Tahr were not present in eight sites: of which four had earlier records of Tahr presence, and the other four had no prior data. There was a significant positive association between percentage of young (kids and yearlings) and number of Tahr sighted. Illegal hunting was widespread in the past, and continues to be a serious threat. Loss of Tahr grazing habitat to successional processes resulting in increased tree cover, is a long term threat that could increase with climate change. A landscape level management plan to reconnect small populations, rehabilitate Tahr in sites where they have disappeared, use fire to restore short grass habitats, and stringent curb on illegal hunting is required for the long term viability of the Nilgiri Tahr in this region.
    Attribution
    Ponniah Hopeland, Jean-Philippe Puyravaud & Priya Davidar, Journal of Threatened Taxa, Vol 8, No 6 (2016); pp. 8877–8882 http://dx.doi.org/10.11609/jott.2542.8.6.8877-8882
  • Title
    Distribution of vultures in Uttar Pradesh, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    As carrion feeders vultures play an important ecological role.  Counts and qualitative assessments were done over three seasons to assess the richness and abundance of vultures in Uttar Pradesh during 2010–11.  Of nine species found in India, Uttar Pradesh has six: Egyptian Vulture Neophron percnopterus (45.9%), Slender-billed Vulture Gyps tenuirostris (25.4%), Indian Vulture (Long-billed Vulture) Gyps indicus (16.8%), White-rumped Vulture Gyps bengalensis (10.3%), Red-headed Vulture (King Vulture) Sarcogyps calvus (0.8%) and Himalayan Griffon Gyps himalayensis (0.7%).  We observed a total of 1993 adults and 91 juveniles, with the Tarai region having the greatest species richness and abundance.  Nesting tree species included Silk Cotton Bombax ceiba, Teak Tectona grandis, Haldu Haldina cordifolia and Sissoo Dalbergia sissoo.  A qualitative assessment indicated that the vulture population had declined in the past 10–15 years, with the main causes being the use of diclofenac, shortage of food and habitat loss.  Disposal of dead animals was mainly done by removing carcasses to village outskirts, where dogs, crows and egrets compete with vultures.  Such a small number of avian scavengers in a large area like Uttar Pradesh should be protected by ensuring safe and sufficient food, recovery from accidents and rehabilitation, and a protected environment.
    Attribution
    Jha Kaushalendra Kumar (2015). Journal of Threatened Taxa 1(7) pp. 6750-6763; doi:10.11609/jott.1784.6750-6763
  • Title
    Habitat utilization by wetland birds of Munderikadavu, a proposed bird sanctuary in northern Kerala, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Munderikadavu is rich in avifaunal diversity. A total of 82 species of birds from 36 families belonging to 13 orders were recorded in the wetland including wetland dependant species. Lowland vegetation had the highest species richness (46 species) followed by upland (41 species), aerial (38 species), emergent vegetation (22 species) and paddy fields (21 species).  Open water had the lowest species richness. Upland vegetation had the highest species diversity (H′-3.19) followed by aerial (H′-2.52).  There was more species overlap between emergent and low land vegetations (Cm-0.7).  The threats in Munderikadavu wetland were dumping of waste and conversion of cultivation land into shrimp farming area. Thus land use changes need to be regulated in order to conserve the wetland and bird community.  
    Attribution
    Roshnath R., Shruthi V. (2015). Journal of Threatened Taxa 12(7) pp. 7870-7878; doi:10.11609/jott.2377.7870-7878
  • Title
    Habitat suitability, threats and conservation strategies of Hump-nosed Pit Viper Hypnale hymnal Merrem (Reptilia: Viperidae) found in Western Ghats, Goa, India
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Recent studies indicate that most species are best conserved in their natural community, which results in niche conservation. Depletion of any species is an irreversible change. In the present study the habitat ecology, threats and conservation strategies for the Hump-nosed Pit Viper Hypnale hypnale are suggested. The present study was undertaken in some protected areas (PAs) of Goa and the cashew plantations adjoining these PAs. H. hypnale prefers cool and moist places; most of the females of this species are found to spend the period from post monsoon to late summer in the cashew plantations adjoining and within the PAs, making them more susceptible to anthropogenic threats. We conclude that this pattern of seasonal changes in habitat use is mostly a consequence of niche conservation. However, this preference for a particular micro-habitat emphasizes the importance for the conservation of this snake population and although the most suitable habitat in the Western Ghats, for this species is included in the protected areas, specific guidelines are needed to assess conservation needs.
    Attribution
    Sawant N.S., Jadhav T.D., Shyama S.K. (2010). Journal of Threatened Taxa 11(2) pp. 1261-1267; doi:10.11609/JoTT.o2490.1261-7